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William Vicary

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NEWS
April 11, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON and DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Not one to seek refuge in clunky medical jargon, psychiatrist William Vicary has always talked of his patients in the most evocative way. He called a convicted killer "a very sick lady with one foot on a banana peel and the other in the gas chamber." He described a teenage murder suspect as "an accident waiting to happen." He deemed Erik Menendez "so sick it was almost time to take him upstairs and put him in the rubber room."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1996
Psychiatrist William Vicary, whose testimony about his altered notes threw the second Menendez brothers murder trial into turmoil, has been removed from the panel of mental health professionals who are appointed by county judges to analyze and testify about defendants in court cases. In an Aug.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1996
Psychiatrist William Vicary, whose testimony about his altered notes threw the second Menendez brothers murder trial into turmoil, has been removed from the panel of mental health professionals who are appointed by county judges to analyze and testify about defendants in court cases. In an Aug.
NEWS
April 11, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON and DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Not one to seek refuge in clunky medical jargon, psychiatrist William Vicary has always talked of his patients in the most evocative way. He called a convicted killer "a very sick lady with one foot on a banana peel and the other in the gas chamber." He described a teenage murder suspect as "an accident waiting to happen." He deemed Erik Menendez "so sick it was almost time to take him upstairs and put him in the rubber room."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1990 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 16-year-old Long Beach youth was "an accident waiting to happen" from emotional problems caused by the murder of his sister, a psychiatrist testified Monday at a hearing to determine whether the teen-ager will be tried as a juvenile or as an adult for gunning down two deaf brothers he did not know. But psychiatrist William Vicary said Joey Paul Bellinger, 16, is "not a hardened antisocial individual" and could be rehabilitated by the California Youth Authority by the time he turns 25.
NEWS
April 18, 1996 | ANN W. O'NEILL and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A jury Wednesday spared the lives of Lyle and Erik Menendez, who shotgunned their millionaire parents to death in Beverly Hills in 1989 and now will spend the rest of their days in state prison with no hope of parole. As the verdicts were read in the tension-filled Van Nuys courtroom, a wave of relief seemed to sweep over the brothers and their defense attorneys when they realized that the jury had rejected the death penalty. The defense lawyers reacted with grins, tears and hugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1990
Two court-appointed psychiatrists testified Wednesday that a delusion-plagued homeless man was legally insane when he stabbed his therapist to death. The testimony came in a Santa Monica courtroom during the first day of arguments to determine the sanity of David Scott Smith, 28, who was convicted Tuesday of first-degree murder in the Feb. 21, 1989, stabbing of social worker Robbyn Panitch. If Smith is ruled insane, he will be committed to a state mental hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1993
Erik Menendez was a "basket case" after he was jailed for killing his parents and only months later disclosed that he had been molested by his father, his jailhouse psychiatrist testified Wednesday. With the focus in the lengthy murder trial of Erik and Lyle Menendez switching one final time to the defense, Dr. William Vicary was called to refute prosecutors' contentions that the brothers' claims of sexual abuse are a fiction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Defense lawyer Leslie Abramson will not be subjected to a criminal investigation for requesting that a psychiatrist delete sections of his notes during the murder trial of Erik and Lyle Menendez, a district attorney's spokeswoman said Monday. "After we reviewed the trial transcripts, we determined that ours is not the office to do an investigation," said Sandi Gibbons. The State Bar of California, however, is conducting its own investigation into the matter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1990
A 16-year-old Long Beach youth was "an accident waiting to happen" from emotional problems caused by the murder of his sister, a psychiatrist testified Monday at a hearing to determine whether the teen-ager will be tried as a juvenile or as an adult for shooting two deaf brothers, one fatally. But Dr. William Vicary said that Joey Paul Bellinger is "not a hardened anti-social individual" and could be rehabilitated by the California Youth Authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1990 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 16-year-old Long Beach youth was "an accident waiting to happen" from emotional problems caused by the murder of his sister, a psychiatrist testified Monday at a hearing to determine whether the teen-ager will be tried as a juvenile or as an adult for gunning down two deaf brothers he did not know. But psychiatrist William Vicary said Joey Paul Bellinger, 16, is "not a hardened antisocial individual" and could be rehabilitated by the California Youth Authority by the time he turns 25.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1993 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Erik Menendez was a "basket case" after he was jailed for the shotgun slayings of his parents and only months later disclosed that he had been molested by his father, his jailhouse psychiatrist testified Wednesday. With the focus in the lengthy murder trial of Erik and Lyle Menendez switching one final time to the defense, Dr. William Vicary was called to refute prosecutors' charges that the brothers' allegations of sexual abuse are fiction.
OPINION
April 14, 1996
Re "Judge Keeps Abramson as Menendez's Lawyer," April 10: Is there anyone who believes that what Leslie Abramson did for her client is not done by the majority of defense lawyers? Being a defense lawyer is inherently unethical and immoral. It is not their duty to find the truth regarding guilt or innocence of their client. Their job is to "get the client off" by any means necessary, even if they know their client is guilty. Even if it means doctoring evidence or introducing innuendo and half-truths.
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