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William Weksel

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BUSINESS
February 12, 1991 | Dean Takahashi/Times staff writer
Whatever happened to William Weksel, former chairman and chief executive of MAI Systems Corp., the financially struggling minicomputer company in Tustin? Weksel, who resigned last November, says he is now head of a New York company, Weksel, Davies & Co., that specializes in corporate restructurings. In a recent interview, he described his parting with longtime business partner Bennett S. LeBow, MAI chairman, as friendly.
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BUSINESS
February 12, 1991 | Dean Takahashi/Times staff writer
Whatever happened to William Weksel, former chairman and chief executive of MAI Systems Corp., the financially struggling minicomputer company in Tustin? Weksel, who resigned last November, says he is now head of a New York company, Weksel, Davies & Co., that specializes in corporate restructurings. In a recent interview, he described his parting with longtime business partner Bennett S. LeBow, MAI chairman, as friendly.
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BUSINESS
December 10, 1988 | Associated Press
A federal judge ruled Friday that MAI Basic Four Inc. understated the role of its investment banker during its $970-million offer for Prime Computer Inc. and said he would issue an order halting the hostile bid. But U.S. District Judge A. David Mazzone said he would stay the order pending an appeal by MAI Basic to the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston. Mazzone said that Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1988 | Associated Press
A federal judge ruled Friday that MAI Basic Four Inc. understated the role of its investment banker during its $970-million offer for Prime Computer Inc. and said he would issue an order halting the hostile bid. But U.S. District Judge A. David Mazzone said he would stay the order pending an appeal by MAI Basic to the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston. Mazzone said that Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1989 | From Times wire services
Tustin-based MAI Basic Four Inc., which is pursuing a hostile takeover of Prime Computer Inc., said today its president and chief executive officer, William B. Patton Jr., will resign to pursue personal and business interests. Patton, whose resignation takes effect Sunday, will be temporarily replaced by William Weksel, a member of the board who previously was president. MAI Basic Chairman Bennett LeBow launched the billion-dollar takeover bid for Natick, Mass.-based Prime in November.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1990 | From Times wire services
Following a trend in the tobacco industry, Liggett Group Inc. said today it will restructure its operations with an eye toward diversification in an apparent bid to boost its lagging earnings. Liggett, which like its competitors has had to deal with bad publicity, also said it plans to change its name to Brooke Group Ltd. Under the restructuring, Liggett will be split into two subsidiaries--Liggett & Myers Tobacco, to be renamed Liggett Group, and Impel Marketing Inc.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
MAI Basic Four Inc., shaking up operations after its ill-fated attempt to take over Prime Computer Inc. earlier this year, has named Fred D. Anderson Jr. president and chief operating officer and moved up William Weksel to chairman. The changes are part of a restructuring the Tustin computer company has launched to create an "entrepreneurial environment" in each of seven new business units, said Bertrand Weidberg, MAI's general counsel.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1988 | David Olmos, Times staff writer
MAI Basic Four filed a motion Monday in a Massachusetts federal court seeking to vacate an order preventing the Tustin computer maker from pursuing its $970-million hostile offer for Prime Computer. On Dec. 9, a federal judge issued an order blocking the offer, saying MAI had understated the role that its investment banker, Drexel Burnham Lambert, is playing in the hostile bid. U.S. District Judge A.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In another sign of a rocky corporate restructuring, MAI Systems Corp., Tustin, said Wednesday that Fred D. Anderson Jr. has resigned as president and chief operating officer to pursue other interests. Anderson, 46, is the second top officer to leave the computer reseller since November, when Chairman William Weksel departed to pursue other interests. Bennett S. LeBow, the New York financier with an 80% stake in MAI, is serving as chairman. Fred Anderson will be succeeded by Peter S.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
MAI Basic Four Chairman Bennett S. LeBow, having failed in his recent hostile bid for Prime Computer, plans to raise his personal stake in MAI to 51% by investing $30 million in the Tustin computer maker. The announcement comes a week after MAI said it expects to report a "significant" third-quarter loss and is laying off 400 people--or nearly 10% of its work force.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
Showing the effects of its unsuccessful hostile bid for Prime Computer, MAI Basic Four Inc. on Monday reported a $46.2-million loss and a 23% drop in sales for the quarter ended June 30. The Tustin computer maker said the loss was largely the result of the $25 million it spent trying to acquire Prime and $14.2 million in expenses associated with a recently announced corporate reorganization and cost-cutting program.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
MAI Systems Corp. said Thursday that William Weksel has resigned as chairman and chief executive of the computer company to pursue other opportunities. Bennett S. LeBow, a New York financier who owns a large stake in MAI, will replace Weksel as chairman and chief executive, the company said. Bert Weidberg, MAI's senior vice president and general counsel, declined to comment on Weksel's departure.
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