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William Ylvisaker

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BUSINESS
August 31, 1988 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Looks unsettling. A U.S. electronics and computer company is being purchased by a Japanese giant, Nippon Mining Co., which at $6.5 billion in sales ranks No. 162 on Fortune's list of the world's biggest firms outside the United States. The last time something like this happened--when Fujitsu Ltd. tried to buy Fairchild Semiconductor in 1987--the U.S. government stepped in to block the deal and prevent the sale of U.S. technology.
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BUSINESS
August 31, 1988 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Looks unsettling. A U.S. electronics and computer company is being purchased by a Japanese giant, Nippon Mining Co., which at $6.5 billion in sales ranks No. 162 on Fortune's list of the world's biggest firms outside the United States. The last time something like this happened--when Fujitsu Ltd. tried to buy Fairchild Semiconductor in 1987--the U.S. government stepped in to block the deal and prevent the sale of U.S. technology.
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BUSINESS
May 6, 1986
Gould Inc. of Rolling Meadows, Ill., has implemented a previously announced management succession plan in which James F. McDonald assumed the position of chief executive, retaining the title of president. William T. Ylvisaker, who had been Gould's chief executive since 1967, now is chairman of the executive committee and retains board chairmanship.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1985
William G. Ylvisaker, chief executive of Gould Inc., will step down next spring, but will continue as board chairman, the company says. Ylvisaker, 61, who transformed Gould from a medium-sized battery company into a $2-billion-a-year electronics company, will also take a new position as chairman of the executive committee, with a principal focus on strategic planning as well as acquisitions and divestitures. Starting April 29, the chief executive of the company, based in Rolling Meadows, Ill.
NEWS
November 13, 1985 | PENNY PAGANO, Times Staff Writer
Finishing a whirlwind American visit, Prince Charles scored a goal Tuesday to help his polo team win a friendly match, and the crowd of 12,000 cheered as his wife, Diana, presented the trophy to the winning team. Charles shrugged off an errant shot that hit him in the right shoulder to score a second-half goal for the Palm Beach polo team, which defeated an all-star squad, 11-10.
NEWS
November 15, 1985 | JODY JACOBS
Snippets from the Palm Beach notebooks: "Smashing," said Prince Charles. He was referring to the dazzling emerald-and-diamond necklace Helen Boehm, his dancing partner, wore to the United World College International Gala at the Breakers. Mrs. Boehm's rings, an emerald and a diamond one, also caught the princely eye. Princess Diana's three strand choker of smallish pearls was more in keeping with British understatement. The princess' dancing pumps were mid-heel and silver.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1985
ARCO To spur the growth of its solar business, the Los Angeles-based oil company spun it off as a company in its own right last year and instructed it to "think like a smaller company" instead of a big Atlantic Richfield division. It has to adhere to its parent's ethics standards but is free to set its own salary and employee benefits structure, dress code, style and staffing standards.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1988 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
Nippon Mining of Tokyo, in what would be the fourth-largest Japanese acquisition of a U.S. company, agreed Tuesday to buy struggling Gould Inc. for $1.1 billion. Gould Chairman James F. McDonald said the decision to sell the computer and electronics concern "was based first and foremost on maximizing share value for our shareholders." Nippon, which has had a series of business partnerships with Gould dating to 1981, will offer Gould shareholders $23.25 cash per share.
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