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NEWS
January 21, 2000
Thank you so much for printing the very informative article on the Fred Jordan Mission and Willie Jordan ("Mission Statement," Jan. 16). I hear Willie Jordan on radio station KFSG-FM (96.3) and have often wondered what she looked like and how she came to run this mission. Your article has given me a picture of Willie and a picture of the scope of the ministry she and her husband started in 1944. But more than that, it has given me an idea about her clientele--women and children! With a servant's heart, Willie has looked at homeless women and children and done unto them as she would have liked someone to do for her if she were in the same situation, and isn't that the golden rule found in the Bible, anyway?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2009 | By Carla Rivera
Cheerful Christmas carols, red-suited Santas and shiny new toys brought smiles to thousands of children and their families as they crowded the downtown Los Angeles area Sunday for annual food and toy giveaways. More than 10,000 children from downtown and surrounding neighborhoods flocked to the Fred Jordan Mission for its 32nd annual event, billed as skid row's largest Christmas toy party. More than 450 volunteers readied themselves with sacks stuffed with Legos, Barbies and other dolls, remote-controlled cars, skateboards, puzzles, books, soccer balls and other goodies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1987
I congratulate reporter Robert S. Weiss for his heart-touching piece on the Urban Campground children (Metro, Aug. 17) and the volunteers who offer them day camp. The photo of the bright-eyed child proudly clad in her day camp T-shirt is a rejoinder to us all. No sensitive person could read this article in its entirety and remain unmoved. Details of the children's day-to-day struggle: being afraid to go to the camp bathrooms alone, having their toys and clothes stolen and being the targets of lewd behavior were sad indeed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2008 | Ari B. Bloomekatz, Times Staff Writer
Before the Rev. Fred Jordan died two decades ago, he told his wife that a mother's touch was needed to run the mission he first opened for men in 1944. "He said that it was a good thing I would be leading," said Willie Jordan, who has headed Fred Jordan Missions since her husband died in 1988. "Most of those who we [now] serve are mothers and children." On Sunday, the mission held its annual Mother's Day banquet in downtown Los Angeles for impoverished women and their families. About 2,000 people attended to participate in a short religious service, eat a plate of baked chicken and greens, and celebrate.
NEWS
July 17, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
Like clockwork, even though few of them own wristwatches, the Wednesday Morning Ladies of Skid Row get together at the same time each week, just so they can compare notes on how things are going. "How many of you have children?" asks Willie L. Jordan, who runs a mission where the women meet. Most raise their hands. "Do you know where they are?" Some do, some don't. "How many of you don't?" Several hands stay up. "Do any of you have kids in jail?" Yes, several say. "In prison?"
MAGAZINE
October 20, 1991 | Martin Booe, EDITED BY MARY McNAMARA
What could a tube of lipstick possibly mean to a woman on Skid Row--especially when chances are good that she can barely feed the kids? In the hands of missionary Willie Jordan, 58, that lipstick can be a powerful weapon for restoring what many down-and-out women need most: self-esteem. More than 40 years ago, when Jordan's late husband, Fred, founded the Fred Jordan Mission on Towne Street, Skid Row was haunted almost exclusively by men--the unemployed, the alcoholic, the mentally ill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2008 | Ari B. Bloomekatz, Times Staff Writer
Before the Rev. Fred Jordan died two decades ago, he told his wife that a mother's touch was needed to run the mission he first opened for men in 1944. "He said that it was a good thing I would be leading," said Willie Jordan, who has headed Fred Jordan Missions since her husband died in 1988. "Most of those who we [now] serve are mothers and children." On Sunday, the mission held its annual Mother's Day banquet in downtown Los Angeles for impoverished women and their families. About 2,000 people attended to participate in a short religious service, eat a plate of baked chicken and greens, and celebrate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2009 | By Carla Rivera
Cheerful Christmas carols, red-suited Santas and shiny new toys brought smiles to thousands of children and their families as they crowded the downtown Los Angeles area Sunday for annual food and toy giveaways. More than 10,000 children from downtown and surrounding neighborhoods flocked to the Fred Jordan Mission for its 32nd annual event, billed as skid row's largest Christmas toy party. More than 450 volunteers readied themselves with sacks stuffed with Legos, Barbies and other dolls, remote-controlled cars, skateboards, puzzles, books, soccer balls and other goodies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1987 | JILL STEWART, Times Staff Writer
Darlene Dominguez held 2-year-old Serena in her arms, one of her four squirming little ones, and pondered a Mother's Day that found her without work, without a car, without a partner to help her raise her family. "My children make me very happy and that's all that really matters," she said, squeezing Serena as the tiny girl's twin sister, Samantha, clambered onto a nearby chair. "As long as they're happy, I'm happy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1987 | ROBERT S. WEISS, Times Staff Writer
An air-conditioned bus drives into the city's Urban Campground--also known as Tent City--and slows as it approaches a Salvation Army trailer. By the time the bus comes to a stop, half a dozen children are rushing toward the door. Other youngsters run throughout the dusty clusters of tents yelling, "It's here! It's here!" In tent after tent, parents rush to get boys and girls ready for day camp. Mothers and fathers search for clean, untorn clothes.
NEWS
January 21, 2000
Thank you so much for printing the very informative article on the Fred Jordan Mission and Willie Jordan ("Mission Statement," Jan. 16). I hear Willie Jordan on radio station KFSG-FM (96.3) and have often wondered what she looked like and how she came to run this mission. Your article has given me a picture of Willie and a picture of the scope of the ministry she and her husband started in 1944. But more than that, it has given me an idea about her clientele--women and children! With a servant's heart, Willie has looked at homeless women and children and done unto them as she would have liked someone to do for her if she were in the same situation, and isn't that the golden rule found in the Bible, anyway?
NEWS
July 17, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
Like clockwork, even though few of them own wristwatches, the Wednesday Morning Ladies of Skid Row get together at the same time each week, just so they can compare notes on how things are going. "How many of you have children?" asks Willie L. Jordan, who runs a mission where the women meet. Most raise their hands. "Do you know where they are?" Some do, some don't. "How many of you don't?" Several hands stay up. "Do any of you have kids in jail?" Yes, several say. "In prison?"
MAGAZINE
October 20, 1991 | Martin Booe, EDITED BY MARY McNAMARA
What could a tube of lipstick possibly mean to a woman on Skid Row--especially when chances are good that she can barely feed the kids? In the hands of missionary Willie Jordan, 58, that lipstick can be a powerful weapon for restoring what many down-and-out women need most: self-esteem. More than 40 years ago, when Jordan's late husband, Fred, founded the Fred Jordan Mission on Towne Street, Skid Row was haunted almost exclusively by men--the unemployed, the alcoholic, the mentally ill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1987
I congratulate reporter Robert S. Weiss for his heart-touching piece on the Urban Campground children (Metro, Aug. 17) and the volunteers who offer them day camp. The photo of the bright-eyed child proudly clad in her day camp T-shirt is a rejoinder to us all. No sensitive person could read this article in its entirety and remain unmoved. Details of the children's day-to-day struggle: being afraid to go to the camp bathrooms alone, having their toys and clothes stolen and being the targets of lewd behavior were sad indeed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1987 | ROBERT S. WEISS, Times Staff Writer
An air-conditioned bus drives into the city's Urban Campground--also known as Tent City--and slows as it approaches a Salvation Army trailer. By the time the bus comes to a stop, half a dozen children are rushing toward the door. Other youngsters run throughout the dusty clusters of tents yelling, "It's here! It's here!" In tent after tent, parents rush to get boys and girls ready for day camp. Mothers and fathers search for clean, untorn clothes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1987 | JILL STEWART, Times Staff Writer
Darlene Dominguez held 2-year-old Serena in her arms, one of her four squirming little ones, and pondered a Mother's Day that found her without work, without a car, without a partner to help her raise her family. "My children make me very happy and that's all that really matters," she said, squeezing Serena as the tiny girl's twin sister, Samantha, clambered onto a nearby chair. "As long as they're happy, I'm happy."
NEWS
August 15, 1993 | IRIS YOKOI
About 7,000 Skid Row-area children were outfitted with new clothes and shoes last week through the Fred Jordan Mission's annual Back to School Days distribution. Foot Locker shoe stores donated 7,000 pairs of tennis shoes, and about 100 clothing manufacturers, including Bugle Boy, Cherokee and Stussy, provided more than 7,000 outfits that were distributed free to needy families on Monday and Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1996
More than 350 needy mothers waited in line Monday to get their hair styled, nails painted and makeup applied as part of an early Mother's Day celebration at a skid row homeless facility in downtown Los Angeles "This is one day I can dedicate to myself," said 42-year-old Elena Bohorquez as a hairstylist combed her hair. Bohorquez, a general relief recipient, lived on the streets for several months before moving to a small apartment near MacArthur Park with her 10-year-old son.
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