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Willie Shoemaker

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SPORTS
April 25, 1992
Willie Shoemaker, by virtue of his $20-million lawsuit, has relegated himself to that esoteric group of greedy professional athletes who deem themselves beyond reproach. Please, Willie, if this legal action is driven by your monetarily driven counsel, tell him to take a hike, tell him to chase an ambulance occupied by somebody else. GERRY LOOMAN Camarillo
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SPORTS
October 13, 2003 | Jim Murray
This column on Bill Shoemaker by the late Jim Murray first appeared in The Times on Feb. 1, 1990: If I were a racehorse today, I think I would be in deep depression. I'd want to wear black bandages and tail ribbons and a black plume. I'd mope a lot and feel like putting crepe on the barn door. Horses everywhere should be in mourning. They are losing their best friend. I don't think Bill Shoemaker ever abused a dying 10-1 shot or even a fading favorite in his life.
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MAGAZINE
March 6, 1988
After all the trials and tribulations Willie Shoemaker has suffered ("Secrets of the Amazing Shoe," by Bill Shoemaker and Barney Nagler, Feb. 7), he now has a happy marriage, a lovely daughter, a well-managed income and an incredible 8,725 racing victories to his name. Though it may be very hard for him to do, as racing has been so much a part of his life, I think he should retire and just sit back and spend time with his family and enjoy the pleasures and joys of life. He may not realize it, but he's at the top of his game right now. KENNETH L. ZIMMERMAN Cypress
SPORTS
April 25, 1992
Willie Shoemaker, by virtue of his $20-million lawsuit, has relegated himself to that esoteric group of greedy professional athletes who deem themselves beyond reproach. Please, Willie, if this legal action is driven by your monetarily driven counsel, tell him to take a hike, tell him to chase an ambulance occupied by somebody else. GERRY LOOMAN Camarillo
SPORTS
April 9, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Willie Shoemaker, 59, who retired only 14 months ago as the all-time leading rider in thoroughbred racing, was critically injured when his car went out of control and then rolled over several times Monday night on a freeway transition road in San Dimas, the California Highway Patrol reported.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
If I were a race horse today, I think I would be in deep depression. I'd want to wear black bandages and tail ribbons and a black plume. I'd mope a lot and feel like putting crepe on the barn door. Horses everywhere should be in mourning. They are losing their best friend. I don't think Bill Shoemaker ever abused a dying 10-1 shot or even a fading favorite in his life. He never brought even a winner to the finish line in filets. Other riders were known as the Slasher, the Ripper.
SPORTS
October 13, 2003 | Jim Murray
This column on Bill Shoemaker by the late Jim Murray first appeared in The Times on Feb. 1, 1990: If I were a racehorse today, I think I would be in deep depression. I'd want to wear black bandages and tail ribbons and a black plume. I'd mope a lot and feel like putting crepe on the barn door. Horses everywhere should be in mourning. They are losing their best friend. I don't think Bill Shoemaker ever abused a dying 10-1 shot or even a fading favorite in his life.
SPORTS
July 11, 1991 | JIM MURRAY
I talked to the world's greatest race rider the other day. I asked him how he thought he was going to do. "Bet on me," Bill Shoemaker said. "I should be even money in here." You never could get much of a price on Willie Shoemaker. It never was advisable to bet against him. But he's not getting ready for a Gold Cup this time. This is not the fourth at Arlington. Even the Kentucky Derby pales beside this challenge.
SPORTS
April 14, 1991 | STEVE JACOBSON, NEWSDAY
They were the best of friends almost from the beginning, Eddie Arcaro, the established pro, and Willie Shoemaker, the new kid with the gifted hands on the reins. They were rivals and fierce competitors. "Nobody was closer than Shoe and I," Arcaro said Tuesday, his voice hushed and grim, from his home in North Miami. He had just watched the television briefing from the California hospital where Shoemaker lay partially paralyzed and in critical condition after a one-car accident.
SPORTS
March 26, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
It was 10 days ago at Santa Anita. Bill Shoemaker had just returned from New Orleans, where he had finished second on a 3-year-old for an old trainer/friend from Chicago. He didn't have any mounts at Santa Anita that day because Ferdinand, the horse he was to have ridden in the San Felipe Handicap, wasn't running because of the muddy track.
SPORTS
August 3, 1991
Bill Shoemaker has progressed to his next level of rehabilitation with the removal of a shoulder and head brace. Shoemaker, thoroughbred racing's all-time winningest jockey, was paralyzed in an auto accident April 8 near San Dimas . He is undergoing rehabilitation at Craig Hospital in Englewood, Colo., where Dr. Indira Lanig said Friday that the halo vest orthosis, secured to Shoemaker's head with screws, was used to immobilize his injured spinal cord.
SPORTS
July 11, 1991 | JIM MURRAY
I talked to the world's greatest race rider the other day. I asked him how he thought he was going to do. "Bet on me," Bill Shoemaker said. "I should be even money in here." You never could get much of a price on Willie Shoemaker. It never was advisable to bet against him. But he's not getting ready for a Gold Cup this time. This is not the fourth at Arlington. Even the Kentucky Derby pales beside this challenge.
SPORTS
April 14, 1991 | STEVE JACOBSON, NEWSDAY
They were the best of friends almost from the beginning, Eddie Arcaro, the established pro, and Willie Shoemaker, the new kid with the gifted hands on the reins. They were rivals and fierce competitors. "Nobody was closer than Shoe and I," Arcaro said Tuesday, his voice hushed and grim, from his home in North Miami. He had just watched the television briefing from the California hospital where Shoemaker lay partially paralyzed and in critical condition after a one-car accident.
SPORTS
April 9, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Willie Shoemaker, 59, who retired only 14 months ago as the all-time leading rider in thoroughbred racing, was critically injured when his car went out of control and then rolled over several times Monday night on a freeway transition road in San Dimas, the California Highway Patrol reported.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
If I were a race horse today, I think I would be in deep depression. I'd want to wear black bandages and tail ribbons and a black plume. I'd mope a lot and feel like putting crepe on the barn door. Horses everywhere should be in mourning. They are losing their best friend. I don't think Bill Shoemaker ever abused a dying 10-1 shot or even a fading favorite in his life. He never brought even a winner to the finish line in filets. Other riders were known as the Slasher, the Ripper.
MAGAZINE
March 6, 1988
After all the trials and tribulations Willie Shoemaker has suffered ("Secrets of the Amazing Shoe," by Bill Shoemaker and Barney Nagler, Feb. 7), he now has a happy marriage, a lovely daughter, a well-managed income and an incredible 8,725 racing victories to his name. Though it may be very hard for him to do, as racing has been so much a part of his life, I think he should retire and just sit back and spend time with his family and enjoy the pleasures and joys of life. He may not realize it, but he's at the top of his game right now. KENNETH L. ZIMMERMAN Cypress
SPORTS
August 3, 1991
Bill Shoemaker has progressed to his next level of rehabilitation with the removal of a shoulder and head brace. Shoemaker, thoroughbred racing's all-time winningest jockey, was paralyzed in an auto accident April 8 near San Dimas . He is undergoing rehabilitation at Craig Hospital in Englewood, Colo., where Dr. Indira Lanig said Friday that the halo vest orthosis, secured to Shoemaker's head with screws, was used to immobilize his injured spinal cord.
SPORTS
March 26, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
It was 10 days ago at Santa Anita. Bill Shoemaker had just returned from New Orleans, where he had finished second on a 3-year-old for an old trainer/friend from Chicago. He didn't have any mounts at Santa Anita that day because Ferdinand, the horse he was to have ridden in the San Felipe Handicap, wasn't running because of the muddy track.
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