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Wimbledon Tennis Tournament

SPORTS
July 8, 2001 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
You go to see tennis and a three-day test match breaks out. What Tim Henman and Goran Ivanisevic couldn't finish Friday at Wimbledon, they couldn't finish Saturday, either, because of intermittent rain. The semifinal match on Center Court was finally postponed for a second time at 7:50 p.m. London time, but at least Henman and Ivanisevic were closer to the finish--if not necessarily closer to determining a winner to face Pat Rafter in the final.
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SPORTS
July 6, 2001 | RANDY HARVEY
If you read London's newspapers, and there is hardly anything more amusing to do here than that, you would think Tim Henman's advance to the Wimbledon semifinals had gripped not only the All England Club but all England. He has aced Madonna and her "Drowned World Tour 2001," which opened a six-night stand Wednesday night in Earls Court Arena, off the front pages.
SPORTS
July 4, 2001 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Whatever Jennifer Capriati lacked in tennis artistry, she made up for in persistence, winning a Center Court battle of attrition, nerves and calls for medical attention in a 6-7 (4), 7-5, 6-3 victory Tuesday over Serena Williams. But it was clear from the other women's quarterfinal matches that Capriati, who has won the Australian and French opens this year, will have to play better in the waning days of the fortnight if she is to win Wimbledon, the third of the four Grand Slam tournaments.
SPORTS
July 4, 2001 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
British tennis fans, longing for their first Wimbledon men's champion since 1936, spent a fitful night Monday after darkness caused suspension of the fourth-round match involving Tim Henman, their last remaining player in this year's tournament. Henman was trailing Todd Martin at the time, 2-1, in sets. But their hopes were renewed Tuesday, when Henman, seeded sixth, rallied to win two sets and the match, 6-7 (3), 7-6 (5), 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.
SPORTS
July 3, 2001 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
The women at the All England Club on Monday played eight fourth-round matches, involving 14 of the world's top 20 players, five Grand Slam champions and three Wimbledon champions. But all most of them wanted to discuss when play ended was today's match between No. 4 Jennifer Capriati and No. 5 Serena Williams. It's a quarterfinal, but it is expected to be played with the intensity of a final. Officials have placed it as the first match of the day on Center Court.
SPORTS
July 1, 2001 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Within the next seven days, barring rain delays, we will learn whether Pete Sampras has justified the No. 1 seeding he received despite not having won a tournament since last year's Wimbledon. Based on his performance during the first week at the All England Club, many experts predict that he will not. No consensus has been formed as to who might become the first Wimbledon men's champion other than Sampras since 1996 and only the second since 1992.
SPORTS
July 5, 2001 | RANDY HARVEY
I'm not sure who will be in the royal box at Center Court today for the Wimbledon women's semifinals. I'm not privy to the arrangements in advance. But if it's anything like early this week, the list will read something like: Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, Lord Frederick Windsor and Lady Gabriella Windsor, Sir Richard and Lady Buckley, Lord and Lady Kindersley and Willy Loman. Loman, you may recall, was the protagonist in "Death of a Salesman." Venus Williams read the book in high school.
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