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Wind Energy

NEWS
November 5, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pioneered in California, wind-generated electrical power is starting to spread to other sections of the United States that have the potential to harness this most elusive of resources. The Midwest in particular has "massive potential" for making use of the alternative energy resource because of its high winds, said Samuel D. Rashkin, technology transfer manager of the California Energy Commission, who has studied the economic feasibility of wind power in the state.
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BUSINESS
March 1, 2009 | Marla Dickerson
One man in the classroom earned more than $100,000 framing tract homes during the building heyday. Another installed pools and piloted a backhoe. Behind him sat a young father who made a good living swinging a hammer in southern Utah. But that was before construction jobs vanished like a fast-moving dust storm in this blustery high desert. Hard times have brought them to a classroom in rural Kern County to learn a different trade. Tonight's lesson: how to avoid death and dismemberment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Alameda County has delayed approval of permits for wind turbines at the Altamont Pass after environmentalists sued two major wind energy companies, claiming their turbines were killing thousands of protected birds. The East Alameda County Board of Zoning Adjustments voted Thursday to hold off on making a decision on 15 permits until Jan. 29 to allow the county planning staff to review a lawsuit filed Monday by the Center for Biological Diversity.
NEWS
August 29, 1999 | BLAKE NICHOLSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A few hundred yards from the cross tower at the Sacred Heart Monastery, two other towers rise from the rugged ranchland toward the heavens. Their purpose has nothing to do with religion, everything to do with economics. For two years, the two 100-foot-tall wind turbines have been saving money and generating electricity for the monastery's 24 Benedictine sisters. "I love to watch them," said Sister Barbara Ann Schwab.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2008 | Associated Press
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. has invested in a wind energy farm in Texas that will generate enough power to light 15% of its Texas operations. The world's largest retailer said Thursday that the Duke Energy Corp. farm was being built in Notrees, Texas, and was to start production in April. The retailer will purchase electricity directly from Duke's Notrees Windpower Project, Duke said. The Bentonville, Ark.-based discount retailer has 360 stores and other facilities in Texas.
OPINION
July 25, 2004 | Alan Weisman, Alan Weisman teaches journalism at the University of Arizona and is the author of the memoir "An Echo in My Blood."
To allay concerns over dwindling oil and mounting carbon residues, President Bush has proposed relying on "clean" coal, a revived nuclear industry and hydrogen cars, which he says could be widely available by 2040. Critics denounce these ideas as either impractical or environmentally outrageous, calling instead for intensified renewable energy development. Both visions are naive. The dilemma isn't just getting enough clean energy, but getting enough energy, period.
REAL ESTATE
October 20, 1985 | TERENCE M. GREEN
Each chorus of an old sea chantey begins, "Blow, ye winds of the morning; blow, ye winds, high ho!" That could well be the theme song of the winds generating electricity at the large and growing number of wind farms, perhaps without narrowing it down only to the mornings. The most recent figures from the American Wind Energy Assn., based in Alexandria, Va., show that wind generation of electricity in California last July--90.7 million kilowatt hours--was more than three times the 30.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2001 | H. JOSEF HEBERT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Like many ranchers facing pressure from developers, Shirley Hindman worries that one day she might have to break up her Nine Mile Ranch, one of the largest spreads in the Walla Walla Valley. "That would make me sick," she says. But now she and her father, Billy, have found another way to protect their 14,000 acres of sagebrush-covered hills and canyonland. The answer has come in the wind--something "we have plenty of," she says. And something also in growing demand. Soon the ridgelines across U.
OPINION
December 6, 2013
Re "Clean energy could choke the grid," Dec. 3 The Times ignores the fact that extreme weather, not renewables, poses the biggest threat to the nation's energy grid. Regardless of the energy source, the grid requires smart management and investment. Predicting mechanical problems at the many aging power plants can be tricky. Imagine asking a mechanic to foresee every problem with a 40-year-old car. System managers are becoming more sophisticated at forecasting weather patterns and are already integrating large quantities of renewables with no reliability impacts.
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