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NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Wind-power turbines, which are increasingly dotting California's mountain and desert regions, don't appear to be having a negative effect on home values, according to a new report by the Lawrence-Berkeley National Laboratory. The research, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, analyzed more than 50,000 home sales near 67 wind farms in 27 counties across nine states. "We find no statistical evidence that operating wind turbines has had any measurable impact on home sales prices," said Berkeley's Ben Hoen, the lead author of the study.
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NATIONAL
November 24, 2013 | By Soumya Karlamangla
In the first case of its kind, a large energy company has pleaded guilty to killing birds at its large wind turbine farms in Wyoming and has agreed to pay $1 million as punishment. Duke Energy Renewables -- a subsidiary of the Fortune 250 Duke Energy Corp. -- admitted to violating the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act in connection with the deaths of more than 160 birds, including 14 golden eagles, according to court documents.  The deaths took place between 2009 and 2013 at two Duke sites in Wyoming that have 176 wind turbines, according to court documents.
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BUSINESS
July 24, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Wind turbines are getting really big — some with blades as long as a football field — and more powerful, often generating 50 times more electricity than the first generation of wind power machines built in the 1980s. But scientists are also studying how to harness the wind in different ways that could help allay concerns that today's turbines are unattractive, noisy and sometimes even dangerous. Already in the works: Turbines that float and turbines that fly. Turbines without blades and turbines with blades fat enough to fit a double-decker bus inside.
NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Wind-power turbines, which are increasingly dotting California's mountain and desert regions, don't appear to be having a negative effect on home values, according to a new report by the Lawrence-Berkeley National Laboratory. The research, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, analyzed more than 50,000 home sales near 67 wind farms in 27 counties across nine states. "We find no statistical evidence that operating wind turbines has had any measurable impact on home sales prices," said Berkeley's Ben Hoen, the lead author of the study.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2009 | Dana Hedgpeth
Determined not to sink along with other links in the auto-supply chain, family-run Dowding Industries Inc. borrowed $12 million to leap into the "green" future and leave the dirty assembly line behind. Almost two years later, Dowding has built the plant and bought the machines to make parts for wind turbines, providers of clean energy intended to help the U.S. become less reliant on foreign oil. But so far Dowding has found little demand. Instead, Dowding's big new machines are making a 35-foot-long, 20-ton steel part for a high-powered water jet system used to cut disposable diapers, brownies and even steel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The Sacramento Municipal Utility District plans to install 15 new wind turbines to boost its energy output, officials said. The additions are part of an expansion of the utility's power plant in the Montezuma Hills area west of Rio Vista. Officials said the new turbines will produce three times more electricity than the eight older turbines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
Wind turbines are getting a close look as an energy source, but wildlife officials do not want the devices to be a source of problems for birds and waterfowl. Dead cormorants, gulls, owls, pelicans and songbirds are found daily beneath the electrical transmission towers across the Lake Audubon causeway near Underwood, said Dave Potter, Audubon Wildlife Refuge manager.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Alameda County has approved permits for 1,700 wind turbines east of San Francisco, despite opposition from environmentalists who say the energy-producing equipment kills thousands of protected birds. The East Alameda Board of Zoning Adjustments approved the permits Thursday after the energy companies that operate the turbines said efforts were being made to reduce bird deaths in the Altamont Pass, one of California's largest centers of wind energy production.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1998
Ground has been broken for two new wind turbines, the first new-generation sources for renewable energy in the state since the electricity market was opened to competition, said Green Mountain Energy Resources, an electricity marketer specializing in "green" energy. Burlington, Vt.-based Green Mountain has promised to build a turbine for every 4,000 customers who chose its all-wind power product. The turbines are being built in the San Gorgonio Pass, near Palm Springs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1992 | From Associated Press
Although wind power has been promoted as kind to the environment, giant wind turbines that generate electricity are proving fatal to golden eagles and other birds. As many as 567 eagles, hawks and other birds of prey were killed by turbine blades and electrical wires during the last two years in the Altamont Pass area near Livermore, the California Energy Commission said. With 7,000 turbines, the 80-acre area has the world's highest concentration of electricity-generating windmills.
OPINION
July 22, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Wind turbines tend to be overshadowed by solar power projects, which get most of the attention from the public and policymakers. That's the case again in a new government plan for renewable energy projects in the California desert. Though the wind industry shouldn't get all the land it wants, the desert master plan should provide more and better space for wind farms. Despite its second-class status, wind is a much bigger producer of electricity than solar. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, wind is now the source of 3.5% of the nation's electricity supply.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Ikea Group, the world's biggest furniture retailer, will double its investment in renewable energy to $4 billion by 2020 as part of a drive to reduce costs as cash-strapped consumers become more price sensitive. The additional spending on projects such as wind farms and solar parks will be needed to keep expenses down as the company maintains its pace of expansion, Chief Executive Mikael Ohlsson said in an interview in Malmo, Sweden. "I foresee we'll continue to increase our investments in renewable energy," said Ohlsson, who plans to step down this year after 3 1/2 years at the helm.
NATIONAL
September 29, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee and Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON — President Obama, in a rare move, blocked the acquisition by a Chinese-owned company of four wind farm projects next to a military base in Oregon. Obama cited in a presidential order issued Friday "credible evidence" that the company "might take action that threatens to impair the national security of the United States. " The decision comes against the backdrop of a presidential race in which Obama and Republican opponent Mitt Romney have traded jabs over who would be more effective in answering the challenges the ascendant Chinese economy poses.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Dan Turner
It seems there is a way to get conservatives to support government handouts: Hand them out to conservatives. As Times staff writers Alana Semuels aud Seema Mehta reported, Mitt Romney is getting himself into trouble with Republican voters in swing states such as Iowa by supporting a bedrock Republican principle: He wants to end the production tax credit for wind energy and force power producers to compete on an even playing field with no...
NATIONAL
August 9, 2012 | By Alana Semuels and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
DES MOINES - It's an overriding conservative principle: Scale back government interference and let businesses survive or fail on their merits. But standing by that principle may hurt Mitt Romney in Iowa, a hotly contested swing state that could provide a crucial six electoral college votes in November. Romney recently upset many conservatives here by saying he would end a government tax credit that helps subsidize a burgeoning wind industry in the state. Some of them - farmers who earn tens of thousands of dollars a year for having wind turbines on their property - say they won't vote for Romney because of his wind position.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Two more golden eagles have been found dead at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power wind farm in the Tehachapi Mountains, for a total of eight carcasses of the federally protected raptors found at the site. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is trying to determine the cause of death of the two golden eagles found Sunday at the Pine Tree wind farm, about 100 miles north of Los Angeles and 15 miles northeast of Mojave, said Lois Grunwald, a spokeswoman for the agency. The agency has determined that the six golden eagles found dead earlier at the 2-year-old wind farm in Kern County were struck by blades from some of the 90 turbines spread across 8,000 acres at the site.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
Regardless of how the Philadelphia Eagles fare in the National Football League playoffs, Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie already has received a congratulatory phone call from the president. President Obama's comments a few weeks ago commending the team for giving a "second chance" to quarterback Michael Vick drew more attention, but the president actually phoned Lurie to praise the Eagles for their pursuit of an environmentally friendly stadium. Lurie and his wife, Christina Weiss Lurie, are retrofitting Lincoln Financial Field with wind turbines, solar panels and a biodiesel-reliant power plant with the goal of making it the first major U.S. sports facility to be self-sufficient on renewable fuel.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Donna and Bob Moran moved to the wind-whipped foothills here four years ago looking for solitude and serenity amid the pinyon pines and towering Joshua trees. But lately their view of the valley is being marred by a growing swarm of whirring wind turbines — many taller than the Statue of Liberty — sweeping ever closer to their home. "Once, you could see stars like you wouldn't believe," Donna Moran said. "Now, with the lights from the turbines, you can't even see the night sky. " It's about to get worse.
NEWS
January 31, 2012 | By Marla Dickerson
Wind energy now supplies about 5% of California's total electricity needs, or enough to power more than 400,000 households. That's the word from the California Wind Energy Assn., which said that California put up more new turbines than any state last year, with 921.3 megawatts installed. Most of that activity occurred in the Tehachapi area of Kern County, with some big projects in Solano, Contra Costa and Riverside counties as well. “The total amount of wind energy installations in 2011 created a banner year for wind generation in California and is helping to drive California closer to reaching its goal of 33% renewable energy ,” said Nancy Rader, executive director of the California Wind Energy Assn.  Wind capacity in the Golden State has doubled since 2002.
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