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Windmills

ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1999 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The major fault of most musicals is a weak book. There are exceptions, of course, with "My Fair Lady" and "Man of La Mancha" prime examples. Based on strong, literate stories, both will be performed into the distant future. "La Mancha" stands virtually alone because of the inventiveness of its conceit. Dale Wasserman's book, unlike Alan Jay Lerner's for "Lady," artfully mixes Cervantes' original tale with incidents from the author's life.
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BUSINESS
October 19, 1998 | JASPER MORTIMER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
European tourists step out of their planes expecting to see the turquoise water, rainbow fish and olive-green coral that make this Red Sea resort famous. Instead, their first sight as they head for hotels is a throwback to home: windmills. It's a wind farm with 40 high-tech windmills set on the desert in neat rows, their 33-foot blades ceaselessly spinning in the relentless breeze. As wind farms go, Hurghada's isn't particularly impressive. Some windmills have three blades, others two.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1998 | DARELL SATZMAN, Special to The Times
Just west of Mojave, about 15 miles north of the Los Angeles County line, entrepreneurs are harvesting the High Desert's most plentiful resource: wind. Since the early 1980s, a handful of energy companies has erected nearly 5,000 windmills on this roughly 16-square-mile swath of Kern County desert.
NEWS
July 15, 1997 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the forgotten middle of welfare reform's great debate, between the harangues on Cadillac queens and starving immigrants, stands Fresno County welfare director Ernest Velasquez, a papier-mache Don Quixote at his side. Over the past 15 years, he has seen the welfare rolls in his county double with the children of Latino farm workers and the arrival of a Southeast Asian mountain tribe straight out of the 16th century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1997 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rising demand for cellular phone and pager service has brought about hassles and headaches--the towering pole-mounted transmitters that many see as eyesores. Homeowners and others who live or work near the proposed transmitter sites increasingly are protesting plans to build towers in the Los Angeles area.
SPORTS
March 20, 1997 | PAIGE A. LEECH
Twenty three games into the college softball season for Cal State Northridge, this much is clear: there is a definite correlation between the earned-run average of the pitching staff and the national ranking of the Matadors. The staff ERA continues to rise and the Matadors keep on falling. The Matadors (11-10-2), who have lost eight of 12 games, have fallen to No. 24 in the national coaches' poll and are in trouble of dropping out for the first time since 1992.
TRAVEL
March 16, 1997
Palm Springs visitors can now tour the area's famous windmills aboard suitable vehicles: electric bicycles and golf carts powered by batteries charged by the mills. The thousands of windmills on the foothills of the San Gorgonio Pass are familiar sights to highway travelers--viewed from afar. But an up-close look is offered by EV Adventures, which since last month has run daily, 1 1/2-hour tours of the private Wintec Inc. wind farm off Interstate 10.
NEWS
March 5, 1997 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they've already changed the world, what are two brothers supposed to do as retirement looms? For Ben and Harold Rosen, the answer is to try to do it again. The Louisiana-bred, Caltech-educated Rosens have embarked on their biggest challenge ever--to produce a clean, efficient and powerful automotive power source that will do nothing less than replace the internal combustion engine. If that sounds familiar, it is. There have been countless schemes to rid the world of the noxious power plant.
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