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HEALTH
January 30, 2012 | By Marta Zaraska, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you don't believe in horoscopes, you're in step with science. But that's not the same as saying the season of your birth cannot affect your fate. Hundreds of studies, published in peer-reviewed journals, have suggested that the month a person is born in is associated with characteristics such as temperament, longevity and susceptibility to certain diseases. Scientists say that even though some of these findings are probably spurious - if you dig around in data, you will eventually find correlations just by chance - other effects are very likely real, triggered not by the alignment of the planets but by exposures during prenatal and early postnatal lives.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON - The U.S. economy shook off the winter doldrums and added a healthy batch of new jobs last month, a reassuring sign that the labor market recovery remains on track. The gain of 192,000 jobs in March, reported Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, indicated that the hiring slowdown earlier in the winter was temporary and stemmed from the unusually cold weather across much of the country. All the jobs added last month came in the private sector, lifting total non-government payrolls to a new peak.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Caity Lotz joined the cast of "Arrow" this season as Sara Lance, the long-lost sister of Laurel Lance and the newly minted costumed crusader Black Canary. In its second season, "Arrow" has upped its connections to the wider DC Universe, and in this week's episode, "Heir to the Demon," fans will get a look at Nyssa al Ghul (Katrina Law) from the League of Assassins. They will also get a look at a more blissful time in the history of the main characters, back in the days before Oliver Queen's fateful boat trip that resulted in Sara's disappearance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Officials announced Tuesday that they are temporarily waiving an endangered species protection to enable water managers to send more Northern California water south. The move comes as fishery agencies are under increasing political pressure to take advantage of late winter storms and ramp up pumping from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the center of the state's water distribution system. Mark Cowin, director of the state Department of Water Resources, said the rule suspension would remain in effect for the next week or two and would increase delta exports by as much as 10,000 acre-feet a day. An acre-foot is equivalent to a year's water supply for two households.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
What would we do without Shelley Jackson ? A decade or so ago, she launched her project “Skin” -  a story told entirely in tattoos, nearly 2,100 of them, etched on the bodies of volunteers she fondly calls "words. " The idea was to create a work of living literature, one that would change, and ultimately disappear, as its participants died, highlighting the ephemeral nature of, well, everything. “Writers have this great obsession,” she told me at the time , “to create an immortal work.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Winter's Tale" is so obviously a passion project, so much a labor of love for industry veteran Akiva Goldsman, that you'd like to be able to say it's a complete success. It isn't, but the parts that do succeed, especially the fervor between stars Colin Farrell and Jessica Brown Findlay, provide such lush, emotional magic that unabashed romantics will be pleased. Co-produced, written and directed by Goldsman, "Winter's Tale" has been drastically pared from Mark Helprin's nearly 700-page 1983 literary blockbuster.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
You might not peg the guy who wrote "I, Robot" and adapted "The Da Vinci Code" as a self-described "shameless romantic. " But then, when looking back on "A Beautiful Mind," the movie that won him a screenplay Oscar, Akiva Goldsman remembers it as a "promise that love conquers all. " So when Goldsman says that he likes to see the world as "a grown-up fairy tale where nothing is without purpose," it makes perfect sense that 30 years ago, riding the...
NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By Jay Jones
It's the season when triple digits are about to become a regular occurrence, yet a certain Las Vegas attraction, Minus5 , is promising “365 more days of winter.” That's actually true given the temperature at both locations - the Monte Carlo and the Shoppes at Mandalay Place - is kept at a constant minus-5 degrees Celsius. That's 23 degrees Fahrenheit, which ensures that the blocks of ice from which everything is carved - the walls, bars and elaborate sculptures - remain frozen.
MAGAZINE
February 9, 1986 | ROBERT SMAUS, Robert Smaus is an associate editor of Los Angeles Times Magazine.
If you were born in California, you may appreciate my fondness for winter--just about the only thing we don't get enough of in our golden state. For me, our endless summer becomes more like a siege by this time of year. When the weatherman says that it's going to be another great weekend, I groan, wishing for the contrast of rain or cold before spring and sunshine are upon us. But the weather does its best not to cooperate with my wishes.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
With a flurry of late season snow, the sale of snow sports equipment and clothing rebounded slightly last winter compared with the abysmal season the previous year. The sale of ski and snowboarding equipment and clothing reached $3.4 billion in the 2012-13 season, up 3% compared with the previous season, according to the latest report from the SnowSports Industry Assn., a trade group for ski, snowboard and apparel retailers and manufacturers. The numbers represent a slight improvement from the 2011-12 season when participation in snow sports dropped 6% over the previous year because of extremely limited snowfall.
SPORTS
March 28, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 The California Coaches Association has selected its winter coaches of the year from the Southern Section. They are Nate Harrison of Anaheim Canyon, boys' basketball; Ann Larson of Ventura, girls' basketball; Arturo Lopez of L.A. Cathedral, boys' soccer; Jeff Gordon of Sunny Hills, girls' soccer; Brian Roth of San Marcos, girls' water polo; David Ochoa of Northview, wrestling, and Brian Weathersby of Santa Margarita girls' water polo, rookie...
TRAVEL
March 14, 2014 | By Dan Blackburn
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, Utah - I am seated on a narrow ledge waiting for the setting sun to add a golden glow to the famous Delicate Arch in Arches National Park. A tripod is wedged between my knees. There is not a lot of room here, and a misstep could result in a nasty fall. Far below, a lone hiker with a backpack walks by - just a small figure diminished by the large arch above him. Then, the light of the setting sun arrives. The red rock begins to glow, and everything else - the trail's 480 feet of elevation gain, the almost precarious perch and more - is swallowed up by the grandeur of the scene.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By David Wharton
Five cities interested in hosting the 2022 Winter Olympics have submitted application files to the International Olympic Committee. Beijing and Oslo head the list, which also includes Almaty, Kazakhstan; Krakow, Poland; and Lviv, Ukraine. The application files provide an overview of each city's vision and concept for the Games. An IOC working group will study the information and submit a report to the executive board, which will then select the official candidates. At that point, the chosen cities have until January 2015 to submit in-depth blueprints of their plans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Lee Romney
SANTA ROSA, Calif. - As a cold rain pelted the parking lot, the gates opened and the cars began to roll through. In an aging Nissan was a 74-year-old longtime farmworker whose landlady had booted him to raise the rent. A 65-year-old disabled woman pulled her Ford Fusion up to the small trailer, where she could at last plug in her sleep apnea machine. Then there was Patsy Perez, 55, who had learned about the fledgling "Safe Parking" program at the county fairgrounds lot after pleading to spend the night in her Volvo outside a downtown shelter.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Factory orders fell again in January, but the rate of decline lessened after a steeper-than-initially-estimated drop the previous month, the Commerce Department said Thursday. New orders for manufactured goods, a key indicator of future factory output, were down 0.7% in January to $483 billion. Analysts projected orders would decline 0.5%. It was the second straight monthly decline and the harsh winter weather in much of the country probably was a factor. PHOTOS: Federal Reserve chairs through the years December's decline was revised down to 2% from an initial estimate of 1.5%, the Commerce Department said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center activated its alert system Thursday to issue an El Niño watch. The alert means that conditions in the eastern tropical Pacific are favorable enough that El Niño has a more than a 50% chance of forming by the summer or fall. Though it's too early to predict with much confidence, if El Niño re-emerges it could produce wetter weather in the southern United States next winter, bring more rain to California, temper the Atlantic hurricane season and push up global temperatures in 2015, experts say. The El Niño cycle begins every two to seven years when weak trade winds in the Pacific allow warmer water to build up along the west coast of South America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center activated its alert system Thursday to issue an El Niño watch. The alert means that conditions in the eastern tropical Pacific are favorable enough that El Niño has a more than a 50% chance of forming by the summer or fall. Though it's too early to predict with much confidence, if El Niño re-emerges it could produce wetter weather in the southern United States next winter, bring more rain to California, temper the Atlantic hurricane season and push up global temperatures in 2015, experts say. The El Niño cycle begins every two to seven years when weak trade winds in the Pacific allow warmer water to build up along the west coast of South America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Saba Hamedy
The winter solstice may mark the longest night of the year, but for Iranians, it's also known as Shab-e Yalda , a celebration with ancient ties that commemorates the triumph of Mithra, the Sun God, over darkness. Feasting on fresh fruits from the summer season and reciting works by 14th century Persian poet Hafez, Iranians all around the world stay up to mark the start of winter. "It's not an official holiday in Iran, but similar to many other ancient traditions, it has become a significant cultural celebration observed by all Iranians," said Bita Milanian, executive director of Farhang Foundation, a nonprofit that celebrates Iranian art and culture in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
U.S. government forecasters say odds are increasing that El Niño, an ocean-warming pattern that alters weather across the globe, will develop later this year. Conditions in the eastern tropical Pacific have shifted enough that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Thursday activated its alert system to issue an official El Niño watch. The alert means that meteorologists now believe El Niño, a natural cycle that occurs every two to seven years, has a more than a 50% chance of forming by the summer or fall.
SPORTS
March 5, 2014 | By Art Spander
She went back to where it all started, to the wall in Sochi. Maria Sharapova, out of boredom really, as a child began smacking a tennis ball while her father played his weekly game a few feet away. "My career started in Sochi," Sharapova said Wednesday, reviewing her trip home and to the Winter Olympics. "Every player starts somewhere. To be able to celebrate that after so many years was special. " Sharapova, the defending champion, and other top women's seeds from the BNP Paribas Open at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden spent time with the media while others spent time on court on opening day. For Madison Keys, the young American, that time, brief as it might have been, was worthwhile.
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