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Winter Olympic Games 1998

SPORTS
February 12, 1998 | JIM MURRAY
Watching the Winter Olympics on TV, I am struck anew with how we in this country prize the second rate in our athletics. I mean, I can do without the luge or the two-man bobsled, and I don't have to go to Nagano to see the New York Rangers play hockey, but I marvel at the pressure-packed implacability of the events for athletes on snow skis or figure skates. Look! You think a World Series is throat-choking pressure? A Super Bowl? Even a golf Open? Wimbledon? Forget it.
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SPORTS
February 12, 1998 | Associated Press
Live coverage of the first U.S. gold medal, an emotional gold for the host country and a night of pairs figure skating couldn't get CBS out of the ratings doldrums. CBS got an 18.1 rating and a 30 share Tuesday night as the network still trails its performance from the last two Olympics. That rating is 32.5% lower than the 26.8 from 1994 and 15.8% off the 21.5 from 1992.
SPORTS
February 12, 1998 | MIKE KUPPER
Sights, sounds and experiences of Nagano: * Before going up the mountain, a hearty breakfast of scrambled eggs, bacon and French fries. * Houses of all sizes and shapes, stuck into any available space and close enough together to qualify for removal to San Francisco. * Comfortable buses with cut-glass light fixtures, reclining seats, trays and cup holders, TV sets and white-gloved drivers who thank you for riding.
SPORTS
February 12, 1998 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Todd Eldredge, the John Elway of figure skating? "I was rooting for John Elway in the Super Bowl," says Eldredge, five-time champion of the United States but never a medalist at the Olympic Games. "I think what he's gone through is kind of similar to my career. I've done a lot of great things, but the one thing I haven't got is a medal." Elway finally got his ring in January. Eldredge hopes to get his piece of shiny metal this week.
SPORTS
February 21, 1998 | Mike Kupper
In 1988, the Jamaican bobsled team was a sensation at the Calgary Winter Games. It wasn't that the Jamaicans were good--they weren't--it was just that they were there. Bobsledders from a Caribbean country? How droll. Dudley Stokes and his hobbin' and a'bobbin' Jamaican buddies are here as well, and considerably better than they were 10 years ago, but the stage is no longer theirs alone in the theater of the absurd.
SPORTS
February 17, 1998 | LARRY STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The beat goes on for CBS. Some of the network's bad breaks have been out of its control, but others have not. On Sunday night, CBS showed the U.S.-Canada hockey game, one of the marquee events of the Winter Olympics, live at 11:45 p.m. in the East but delayed three hours in the West. CBS was pleased with the rating it got for the game--a 4.9 with a 14 share, the highest rating for a network hockey broadcast in two decades. Fox's highest rating in four years of NHL coverage was a 4.
SPORTS
February 17, 1998
ALPINE SKIING Michael Von Gruenigen of Switzerland, a two-time World Cup giant slalom champion, is a favorite along with Austria's Hermann Maier in the men's giant slalom. MEN'S HOCKEY Finland, with Teemu Selanne, Jari Kurri and Saku Koivu, will have its hands full against defending champion Sweden, with Peter Forsberg and Nicklas Lidstrom. WOMEN'S HOCKEY This is a grudge match eight years in the making. Time hasn't dulled it. Familiarity hasn't softened it. In once corner, the U.S.
SPORTS
February 17, 1998 | MIKE PENNER
If you can't beat 'em, naturalize 'em. (And then notify the Swedes and the International Ice Hockey Federation and see if you can maneuver your way into a more favorable quarterfinal matchup.) That is what it has come down to for Dream Team USA as it sadly teeters on the brink of elimination in this Olympic men's hockey tournament.
SPORTS
February 17, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The era of Soviet domination of international hockey is over, never to return. The republics that used to funnel players to the big red machine are independent now, with each fielding its own national and Olympic team. The best players have long since fled to the NHL for big money. Even Russia, which supplied most of the players on the great Soviet Olympic and world championship teams, has gone through hard times in hockey terms since the splintering of the Soviet Union.
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