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Winter Solstice

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FOOD
November 3, 2012 | By Charles Perry
Winter seasonal beers are traditionally a bit sweet, often with a spice note, for comfort in cold weather. Winter Solstice follows this pattern, but it seems specifically designed for one particular season: Turkey Day and the subsequent Turkey Leftover Days. It pours medium amber with a moderate tan head. The nose is malty and very slightly yeasty, with a hint of nutmeg and perhaps allspice. On the palate, it's rich and round and somewhat plush, with hops firmly marching in to dry up the sweetness during the long finish.
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NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Saturday is the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year in terms of daylight hours -- and perhaps a sun lover's nightmare and a stargazer's delight. Jack Fusco falls into the second category, and his time-lapse video above shows how fascinating the heavens can be. The more than 2,000 photos he took during the October Jasper Dark Sky Festival in Alberta, Canada , create an ethereal portrait of an area that ranks low in light pollution. That's distinctly different from New Jersey, where he began to experiment with photography by taking photos of the ocean at sunrise.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Saba Hamedy
The winter solstice may mark the longest night of the year, but for Iranians, it's also known as Shab-e Yalda , a celebration with ancient ties that commemorates the triumph of Mithra, the Sun God, over darkness. Feasting on fresh fruits from the summer season and reciting works by 14th century Persian poet Hafez, Iranians all around the world stay up to mark the start of winter. "It's not an official holiday in Iran, but similar to many other ancient traditions, it has become a significant cultural celebration observed by all Iranians," said Bita Milanian, executive director of Farhang Foundation, a nonprofit that celebrates Iranian art and culture in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Saba Hamedy
The winter solstice may mark the longest night of the year, but for Iranians, it's also known as Shab-e Yalda , a celebration with ancient ties that commemorates the triumph of Mithra, the Sun God, over darkness. Feasting on fresh fruits from the summer season and reciting works by 14th century Persian poet Hafez, Iranians all around the world stay up to mark the start of winter. "It's not an official holiday in Iran, but similar to many other ancient traditions, it has become a significant cultural celebration observed by all Iranians," said Bita Milanian, executive director of Farhang Foundation, a nonprofit that celebrates Iranian art and culture in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1997 | EDWARD M. YOON
The paintings at Stoney Point and Burro Flats in Chatsworth and how they relate to the winter solstice will be discussed at the monthly general meeting of the Santa Susana Mountain Park Assn. on Monday. Archeologist John Romani, who has conducted research in the west San Fernando and Simi valleys for 30 years, will present slides documenting the relationship of the area rock paintings, or pictographs, to the winter solstice.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Rick VanderKnyff is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition. and
Tuesday marks the winter solstice, when the sun is farthest south of the Equator and the shortest day of the year occurs in the Northern Hemisphere. To mark the occasion, the Sierra Club's Orange County group takes a stroll along bridle paths winding through Fullerton. Flashlights and warm jackets will be required equipment for this walk, which begins at 6 p.m.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Saturday is the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year in terms of daylight hours -- and perhaps a sun lover's nightmare and a stargazer's delight. Jack Fusco falls into the second category, and his time-lapse video above shows how fascinating the heavens can be. The more than 2,000 photos he took during the October Jasper Dark Sky Festival in Alberta, Canada , create an ethereal portrait of an area that ranks low in light pollution. That's distinctly different from New Jersey, where he began to experiment with photography by taking photos of the ocean at sunrise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1985 | Associated Press
About 200 sun-worshipers gathered for the winter solstice Saturday at Stonehenge, the 4,000-year-old stone monument in Salisbury Plain, but clouds obscured the view. Music from primitive instruments accompanied the sunrise vigil at the mysterious double ring of 72 stones, thought to have been used for ancient worship and astronomical observation. Three police officers were on hand, but the gathering was peaceful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1989 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the closest thing to a religious experience that a man like Alexander Prairie could have during the Christmas season. It was 1:22 p.m. Thursday and Prairie, head of Los Angeles' largest atheist organization, was standing in front of a Nativity scene in Santa Monica. The model of the baby Jesus lying in a manger in front of him wasn't occupying the 52-year-old's thoughts, however. He was reflecting on the Winter Solstice.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Considering the wealth of music written to celebrate Christmas,most music organizations suffer acute poverty of imagination when the season rolls around. A surfeit of "Messiah" permutations and banal carol medleys return as predictably as department store Santas. The La Jolla Civic-University Orchestra and Chorus, however, has regularly proved a welcome exception to this dull convention.
NEWS
September 5, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Sleep deprivation makes people look unattractive and sad, according to a small study in the academic journal Sleep. That should seem obvious to anyone who's ever looked at themselves in the mirror after skimping on sleep, but the analysis is interesting. “Since faces contain a lot of information on which humans base their interactions with each other, how fatigued a person appears may affect how others behave toward them,” says doctoral candidate Tina Sundelin. “This is relevant not only for private social interactions, but also official ones such as with health care professionals, and in public safety.” (Learn more about the sleep deprivation study from the Atlantic's health editor James Hamblin.)
FOOD
November 3, 2012 | By Charles Perry
Winter seasonal beers are traditionally a bit sweet, often with a spice note, for comfort in cold weather. Winter Solstice follows this pattern, but it seems specifically designed for one particular season: Turkey Day and the subsequent Turkey Leftover Days. It pours medium amber with a moderate tan head. The nose is malty and very slightly yeasty, with a hint of nutmeg and perhaps allspice. On the palate, it's rich and round and somewhat plush, with hops firmly marching in to dry up the sweetness during the long finish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2011 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Juan Bautista, Calif. -- On the darkest day of the year, a hushed crowd in a dim church awaited a few minutes of sheer brilliance. It was just after dawn Wednesday, the day of the winter solstice. Outside the 200-year-old mission at the heart of tiny San Juan Bautista, Native American drummers sang, urging the sun to rise. Inside, dozens of parishioners rubbed the sleep from their eyes. A woman stood up and sang in cadences haunting and solemn — phrases in no known tongue, she said, but "the language of the heart.
WORLD
December 21, 2008 | Associated Press
Iranians recited poetry, shared stories and ate fruits and nuts Saturday during all-night celebrations of the longest night of the year, a tradition going back thousands of years to when Zoroastrianism was the predominant religion of ancient Persia. For many Iranians, the celebration, known as Yalda, offers a link with ancient traditions as well as a chance to gather with family.
OPINION
December 23, 2006 | MEGHAN DAUM
MOST CLICHES, particularly those related to Los Angeles, are rooted in some semblance of reality. But the notion that the L.A. region is a vast strip mall whose only outdoor attractions involve surfing and driving around in convertibles has always irked me. Last month in Ojai, which is close enough to the city that you'd think people would know better, a woman who knew I was from L.A. saw my dog sniffing some tree roots and said, "I bet he doesn't get to do that very often."
OPINION
May 15, 2006
Re " 'Da Vinci Code' Now a Tool to Win Christian Converts," May 11 I don't know why some churches are worried that people would think Christianity is a sham just because of "The Da Vinci Code." I mean, we have our Christmas tree (a Druidic symbol worshiped during the winter solstice) and eggs at Easter (Oester, a pagan goddess worshiped during the spring equinox festival, when village children would hunt for colorful eggs). You wanted proof that Christianity is more than a religion cobbled together from various others by powerful men in Rome who needed to control the masses?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
The stage lights at Royce Hall never quite achieved full wattage at Saturday night's concert of New Age music by Nightnoise, Liz Story and Philip Aaberg. As it turned out, the dim, cloistered atmosphere that resulted--long on whites, blacks and grays, and short on primary colors--proved oddly appropriate for a program whose theme was the winter solstice. Wisely, the evening was scheduled to include various combinations of performers, as well as solo turns for each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1986 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
'Tis the season to be jolly: Christmas, Hanukkah, Yalda. Yalda? Tonight, at the California Zoroastrian Center in Westminster, members of one of the world's oldest monotheistic religions will demonstrate that the festivities of this season are not limited to Christians and Jews. Yalda is a non-religious festival marking the winter solstice, the longest night of the year, the same celestial phenomenon favored by early pagans and Christians alike for winter holidays, including Christmas. Dr.
OPINION
July 25, 2005
THE SUBJECT OF extending daylight saving time leads grown congressmen to come out with such lines as, "It just makes everyone feel sunnier." An amendment to set the clocks forward earlier in the year, and set them back a bit later, (cosponsored by Rep. Edward J. Markey [D-Mass.], who spoke the "sunnier" remark) has offered the sole comic relief in the energy bill, an otherwise morose bucket of lawmaking. The public understandably is focused more on daylight saving time than, say, the bill's provision on MTBE lawsuits.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2005 | Lydia Marcus, Special to The Times
Generations have celebrated the winter solstice -- the shortest day of the year -- because they understood that each day that followed would mean longer hours of sunlight to warm their climates, nourish their harvests and sustain life. For first-time feature filmmaker Josh Sternfeld, 32, this annual event provides the metaphor for the emotional state of the characters in his new film "Winter Solstice," which opened Friday in Los Angeles.
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