Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWisconsin Suits
IN THE NEWS

Wisconsin Suits

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1992 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traffic radar guns, which save lives by catching speeders, have come under suspicion as a possible cause of cancer in traffic officers exposed to their microwave beams, triggering a series of lawsuits by an Agoura Hills lawyer. Attorney John E. Sweeney has filed suits on behalf of five former traffic officers who contracted cancer and are seeking millions of dollars in damages from radar equipment manufacturers, whom they accuse of failing to warn of health risks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 9, 1997 | (Associated Press)
World Wide Web Casinos Inc. is suing Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson and Atty. Gen. James Doyle for refusing to let an online gaming business open in a Milwaukee suburb. The lawsuit, filed this week in federal court in Milwaukee, contends that Doyle's office told the firm in March that setting up an Internet gambling business that would serve overseas gamblers was illegal under state law. The company claims, however, that Wisconsin's gambling laws do not apply to its proposed Internet operation.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | Associated Press
Wisconsin officials and Chippewa leaders announced Monday that they are ending a 17-year-old legal battle over 19th-Century treaty rights. The decision lets stand federal court rulings protecting the rights of the Chippewa to gather plants, hunt deer and spear fish on land in northern Wisconsin that was ceded to the tribe in the 1800s.
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The parents of one of Jeffrey L. Dahmer's victims can proceed with their lawsuit against the city and three police officers, but similar suits were dismissed by a judge. The suit that U.S. District Judge Terence Evans let stand was filed in Milwaukee by Sounghone and Somdy Sinthasomphone, the parents of 14-year-old Konerak Sinthasomphone, who was killed by Dahmer after the three officers led the naked boy back to Dahmer's apartment May 27. They said they believed he was Dahmer's lover.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1997 | (Associated Press)
World Wide Web Casinos Inc. is suing Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson and Atty. Gen. James Doyle for refusing to let an online gaming business open in a Milwaukee suburb. The lawsuit, filed this week in federal court in Milwaukee, contends that Doyle's office told the firm in March that setting up an Internet gambling business that would serve overseas gamblers was illegal under state law. The company claims, however, that Wisconsin's gambling laws do not apply to its proposed Internet operation.
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing frustration with public schools has helped forge an unlikely alliance between blacks and conservative whites that may make Wisconsin the first state in the nation to use public funds to pay directly for private school educations. The school plan--sort of a modified voucher system passed by the Legislature in March--is scheduled to go into effect with the start of school in the fall.
NEWS
February 23, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, acting in the case of a 4-year-old boy who was severely beaten by his father, ruled Wednesday that governments and their employees have no duty under the Constitution to protect citizens from danger or to intervene to save their lives.
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The parents of one of Jeffrey L. Dahmer's victims can proceed with their lawsuit against the city and three police officers, but similar suits were dismissed by a judge. The suit that U.S. District Judge Terence Evans let stand was filed in Milwaukee by Sounghone and Somdy Sinthasomphone, the parents of 14-year-old Konerak Sinthasomphone, who was killed by Dahmer after the three officers led the naked boy back to Dahmer's apartment May 27. They said they believed he was Dahmer's lover.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1992 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traffic radar guns, which save lives by catching speeders, have come under suspicion as a possible cause of cancer in traffic officers exposed to their microwave beams, triggering a series of lawsuits by an Agoura Hills lawyer. Attorney John E. Sweeney has filed suits on behalf of five former traffic officers who contracted cancer and are seeking millions of dollars in damages from radar equipment manufacturers, whom they accuse of failing to warn of health risks.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | Associated Press
Wisconsin officials and Chippewa leaders announced Monday that they are ending a 17-year-old legal battle over 19th-Century treaty rights. The decision lets stand federal court rulings protecting the rights of the Chippewa to gather plants, hunt deer and spear fish on land in northern Wisconsin that was ceded to the tribe in the 1800s.
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing frustration with public schools has helped forge an unlikely alliance between blacks and conservative whites that may make Wisconsin the first state in the nation to use public funds to pay directly for private school educations. The school plan--sort of a modified voucher system passed by the Legislature in March--is scheduled to go into effect with the start of school in the fall.
NEWS
February 23, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, acting in the case of a 4-year-old boy who was severely beaten by his father, ruled Wednesday that governments and their employees have no duty under the Constitution to protect citizens from danger or to intervene to save their lives.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|