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Wolf

ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
What is it about the Oscars that lends itself to so much premature ... speculation? Whether it's declaring the best picture race over and done ( Congratulations, "12 Years a Slave!" Your Oscar's in the mail! ), surveying the awards-season landscape months before the movies have actually screened ( "Foxcatcher," we hardly knew ye ) or definitively declaring a movie out of the Oscar race without so much as a source citation, half-baked hunches are all the rage these days.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Martin Scorsese's "The Wolf of Wall Street" didn't steal quite enough box office riches to beat the "Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" on Wednesday. "Wolf of Wall Street," the Leonardo DiCaprio-starring dark comedy from Paramount Pictures and Red Granite Pictures, grossed an estimated $9.1 million in the U.S. and Canada, coming in just behind "Smaug," which looks like it generated around $9.3 million in ticket sales.  "Smaug," the second part of the "Hobbit" trilogy based on the book by J.R.R.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2012 | By David Willman, Los Angeles Times
DENVER - As Chris Lindley drove to work that morning in August 2008, a call set his heart pounding. The Democratic National Convention was being held in Denver, and Barack Obama was to accept his party's presidential nomination before a crowd of 80,000 people that night. The phone call was from one of Lindley's colleagues at Colorado's emergency preparedness agency. The deadly bacterium that causes tularemia - long feared as a possible biological weapon - had been detected at the convention site.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
"Game of Thrones" can be a brutal show, but here's a little tidbit from real life that should at least provide an "awww" moment for fans used to getting their hearts broken. Actress Sophie Turner, who plays Sansa Stark on the series, has adopted the dog that played her dire wolf, Lady, on the series. Turner, 17, was the subject of a profile in her local newspaper, the Coventry Telegraph on Friday, and while much of the article discussed her involvement in the local theater scene, her schooling and the process of making of the HBO megahit, the following tidbit was tucked in at the end. "In between her hectic filming schedule, Sophie likes nothing more than to relax at home with her family and pet dog Zunni, who the family adopted from the series," the paper says.
OPINION
January 18, 2003
Thank you for including "Farewell, Leader of the Pack" in your Jan. 13 editorial pages. This warm, sensitive tribute to one of our fellow Earth mates has made my day happier. I am not an animal rights activist. I simply appreciate nature and all her creatures that share this beautiful Earth. While saddened by [the wolf] No. 2's defeat in his valiant fight to live, these few paragraphs are a heart-warming testimony to his life. Long may his genes live. Dorothy A. Duplissey Huntington Beach
OPINION
December 3, 2004
The Nov. 28 article, "Alaska Starts Aerial Wolf Hunt," left out three crucial points. One, Alaska Gov. Frank Murkowski ignored the wishes of 70% of Alaska's voters to protect the wolves from aerial hunts. Two, the hunts are carried out in a cruel way in which the wolves are chased down to the point of exhaustion and collapse, then they are shot at point-blank range. And three, the "effort to boost the moose and caribou population" has nothing to do with protecting these species; it's to ensure a large enough population to appease the hunting lobby, which brings millions of dollars.
NATIONAL
October 26, 2013 | By Julie Cart
ALBUQUERQUE - In the small, rural community of Reserve, children waiting for the school bus gather inside wooden and mesh cages provided as protection from wolves. Parents consider the "kid cages" a reasonable precaution. Defenders of the wolves note there have been no documented wolf attacks in New Mexico or Arizona. Fears of wolves attacking humans, they say, are overblown, and the cages nothing more than a stunt. In 1995, the reintroduction of Canadian gray wolves into the northern Rockies ignited a furor.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Is it morality or aesthetics that drove down the CinemaScore of “The Wolf of Wall Street”? Or, put more simply, why exactly did people seem to dislike “The Wolf of Wall Street,” Martin Scorsese's jamboree of sex, drugs and money that opened on, gulp, Christmas Day. Though the freewheeling film, which stars Leonardo DiCaprio as the finance-world nihilist Jordan Belfort, took in a solid $9.1 million on its first day in theaters, the...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
With its three hours of wall-to-wall sex, drugs and greed, Martin Scorsese and Leonard DiCaprio's "The Wolf of Wall Street" has sparked debate over its artistic merit , polarized audiences and even caused a minor row at an academy screening. But at the freewheeling Golden Globe Awards ceremony Sunday night, all that bad behavior provided something else--ample material for wisecracks and one-liners. Though the film won just one award, a best actor in a comedy or musical for Leonardo DiCaprio, its presence loomed much larger.
SCIENCE
March 6, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Nearly 200 years after Charles Darwin wondered how a fox-looking wolf came to live on South American islands hundreds of miles from the mainland, scientists think they have the answer. The Falkland Islands wolf, the only land animal believed to have occupied the Falkland Islands before it was hunted into extinction in the 19 th century, trekked to its final home over ice sheets during the last ice age, researchers concluded. The wolf, Dusicyon australis , became isolated from its sister species, Dusicyon avus, on the South America mainland about 16,000 years ago, according to the study published Tuesday in Nature Communications.
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