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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
Martin Scorsese took time from his busy schedule promoting "The Wolf of Wall Street" recently to moderate a question-answer period while Hong Kong-based filmmaker Wong Kar Wai was in New York. Scorsese lent his name to Wong's "The Grandmaster" when it opened theatrically last summer with the credit "Martin Scorsese presents. " Wong is among the world's most celebrated filmmakers, a longtime festival favorite for films such as "Chungking Express" and "In the Mood for Love. " His latest, "The Grandmaster," is a romantic martial arts epic that was submitted for the foreign language Oscar, representing Hong Kong.
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OPINION
December 23, 1990
In reality, the same ranchers and hunters John Balzar consulted ("Animal Populations Put Parks in a Bind," Part A, Dec. 17) are the source of the problem. Until they drop their opposition to the restoration of the gray wolf to Yellowstone, we can look forward to annual scenes of hunters lined up like firing squads and mowing down buffalo. For tens of thousands of years the wolf has been the key component in keeping prey base populations in balance to any ecosystem the wolf is indigenous to. We can no longer plead ignorance in barring his return to Yellowstone.
SPORTS
May 17, 2003
Within the last two weeks, we've been hearing about NFL stadium plans from Pasadena, Los Angeles and Carson. Haven't we been down this road before? Jack Wolf Westwood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1987
I enjoyed your article on wolves (Part I, Nov. 2). You presented a well-researched and informative piece. The issue of reintroduction of the wolf touches upon our commitment to a real natural preserve, not sanitized to serve particular economic or recreational interests. Management of the wolves, cattle and indemnification can resolve the problems for the ranchers. Predators are often convenient targets in instances of range and stock mismanagement. Certainly, there is ample evidence that the deer and elk populations will benefit from the return of their most skillful manager, the wolf.
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