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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2009 | Associated Press
The International Mozarteum Foundation said Thursday that it has discovered two more works composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The previously unknown works are piano pieces composed by a young Mozart, the Salzburg-based foundation said in a brief e-mail statement. The foundation declined to provide more details Thursday, saying specifics would be made public during a presentation in Salzburg on Aug. 2. During the event, Austrian musician Florian Birsak will perform the pieces on an original Mozart piano.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By David Ng
Don Campbell, the author who convinced millions around the world that listening to the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart makes you smarter, died Saturday at 65 in Colorado, his publicist told the Associated Press. He reportedly had pancreatic cancer. Campbell wrote the bestselling 1997 book "The Mozart Effect," which argued that listening to the music of Mozart benefits mental and bodily functions, and raises the listener's cognitive levels. His book "The Mozart Effect for Children" persuaded many parents to play Mozart recordings to their children in the belief that the music would enhance brain development.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A manuscript of nine symphonies handwritten by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is expected to bring a record price of at least $1.5 million when it is sold later this month at Sotheby's, the London auction house said Monday. "This manuscript is beyond comparison in auction history," said Stephen Roe, music expert at Sotheby's auction house. The manuscript is a 510-page volume in Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's own writing that contains nine symphonies, Nos. 22 to 30.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2009 | Associated Press
The International Mozarteum Foundation said Thursday that it has discovered two more works composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The previously unknown works are piano pieces composed by a young Mozart, the Salzburg-based foundation said in a brief e-mail statement. The foundation declined to provide more details Thursday, saying specifics would be made public during a presentation in Salzburg on Aug. 2. During the event, Austrian musician Florian Birsak will perform the pieces on an original Mozart piano.
NEWS
May 20, 1989 | From Reuters
Locks of hair from the heads of composers Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-91) and Ludwig van Beethoven (1770- 1827) were sold Friday by Sotheby's auction house for a record $17,700 to a London antique dealer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1998
* "Christmas Memory" and "One Christmas"--Gretchen Oehler and Michael Tulin, above, perform a staged reading of Truman Capote's tales of childhood at Pacific Resident Theatre in Venice. * "Christmas in L.A."--Zeitgeist Theatre Company presents five one-act plays exploring what Christmas is like in the entertainment capital, opening Friday at Whitmore-Lindley Theatre Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Salzburg Festival will produce all 22 operas of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart next year in a marathon 250th birthday present to the Austrian musical genius. "The great seven operas ... would have been too little for Salzburg," said festival director Peter Ruzicka. "The idea is to be able to examine the development of this unique genius and to contrast it with the music of the 21st century."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Mozart Theory: In the ongoing debate about the death of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, a British physician and pharmacologist now advances the theory that Mozart was inadvertently poisoned by doctors administering antimony and possibly mercury, which were used as medicines in 18th-Century Vienna. Dr. Ian James of London's Royal Free Hospital presented his findings to the British Assn. for Performing Arts Medicine. However, Dr. Peter J.
NEWS
June 12, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Iowa music history professor has found portions of two little-known Viennese operas he says were written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the New York Times reported. The discovery was made by David J. Buch, a professor of music history at the University of Northern Iowa last year in the archives of the City and University Library in Hamburg, Germany. Mozart's compositions are included in "The Philosopher's Stone" and "The Beneficent Dervish."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By David Ng
Don Campbell, the author who convinced millions around the world that listening to the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart makes you smarter, died Saturday at 65 in Colorado, his publicist told the Associated Press. He reportedly had pancreatic cancer. Campbell wrote the bestselling 1997 book "The Mozart Effect," which argued that listening to the music of Mozart benefits mental and bodily functions, and raises the listener's cognitive levels. His book "The Mozart Effect for Children" persuaded many parents to play Mozart recordings to their children in the belief that the music would enhance brain development.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A team of musicologists is reviewing 19th century copies of musical scores from a Polish monastery's archives in hopes that some might prove to be previously unknown works by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the lead scholar said Tuesday. The team is focused on nine scores, though the musicologists will review 2,000 from the Jasna Gora monastery in Czestochowa, southern Poland. "The scores could be compilations from various Mozart works, or compositions by other authors just signed in his name, or -- in the luckiest case for us -- they could be unknown authentic Mozart," said Remigiusz Pospiech, head of the research team.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A British music scholar says he has identified a previously unknown portrait of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart that could be worth millions. The 19-by-14-inch oil painting shows the profile of a man in a bright red jacket. Cliff Eisen, who teaches music at King's College London, said that it is only the fourth known authentic portrait of Mozart from his time, when the composer was at his professional height in Vienna. King's College said the portrait was probably painted by Joseph Hickel, who was a painter at Austria's imperial court.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2007 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
Seven films featured as part of last year's New Crowned Hope Festival in Vienna to mark the 250th anniversary of Mozart's birth will be shown next week as part of the Los Angeles Film Festival. The six features and a short were commissioned by Peter Sellars, the Vienna festival's artistic director, who sought international filmmakers who would deal in highly personal ways with such Mozartian themes as transformation, forgiveness and recognition of the dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2007 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
Phil Grabsky's eloquent documentary "In Search of Mozart" seems certain to delight music lovers yet also engages the attention of one woefully lacking in knowledge and appreciation of classical music. It is impossible to watch this film and not be moved by the richness and variety of the music and the poignancy of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's prodigious but very short life -- he died in Vienna, probably of rheumatic fever and kidney failure, at age 35 in 1791.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Mozart has a new record -- and this one isn't pressed into vinyl. Organizers of last year's series of festivals, exhibitions, concerts and conferences to celebrate the 250th anniversary of composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's birth said Tuesday the jubilee drew 1.2 million tourists to Austria -- a record for a single festival. The anniversary year is still winding down and won't be completed until the end of the month.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Mozart is still generating hits: millions of them, in fact. A jubilee year of celebrations marking the 250th anniversary of the composer's birth ended Friday with a flourish: As a harpsichord player tapped out a posthumous premiere of a previously unknown tune, a new online database of all of Mozart's works got its 20 millionth page view.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Mozart has a new record -- and this one isn't pressed into vinyl. Organizers of last year's series of festivals, exhibitions, concerts and conferences to celebrate the 250th anniversary of composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's birth said Tuesday the jubilee drew 1.2 million tourists to Austria -- a record for a single festival. The anniversary year is still winding down and won't be completed until the end of the month.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2006 | From the Associated Press
For centuries, historians have portrayed Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart as poor, but new documents suggest the composer was not nearly as hard-up for cash as many have believed. Scholars who combed through Austrian archives for a Mozart exhibition that opened in Vienna on Tuesday found evidence that he was solidly upper crust and lived the good life.
NEWS
December 14, 2006
On the Web: Mozart enthusiasts, students and scholars can now access the immortal composer's entire catalog through a free online database with some 24,000 pages. The database -- available at dme.mozarteum.at-- also contains more than 8,000 pages of critical commentary published since 1954, said Ulrich Leisinger, head of research at the International Mozart Foundation, which launched the site this week. Local artist honored: Edgar Arceneaux, an L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
"WELCOME to Vienna and this special edition of 'Alternative Radio,' " the MC proclaims to an eager late-night crowd in the hip concert space of Austrian Radio. Jimi Hendrix's freak-out version of "The Star-Spangled Banner" blasts through the loudspeakers, more raucously distorted than ever. The lights go crazy. America has never heard anything like this, the MC enthusiastically announces.
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