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OPINION
July 4, 2009
For my money, the funny Leno is the one who's not on TV. Mavis Nicholson Leno is swift with the wisecrack, and she has this big, hearty, irresistible laugh that you suspect makes her her husband's best audience. But there's a fierce focus in her that I first saw about 10 years ago, after she'd begun working with the Feminist Majority on behalf of women in Afghanistan. That was well before most Americans could place Afghanistan on a map, much less knew what vileness the Taliban was up to.
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OPINION
July 4, 2009
For my money, the funny Leno is the one who's not on TV. Mavis Nicholson Leno is swift with the wisecrack, and she has this big, hearty, irresistible laugh that you suspect makes her her husband's best audience. But there's a fierce focus in her that I first saw about 10 years ago, after she'd begun working with the Feminist Majority on behalf of women in Afghanistan. That was well before most Americans could place Afghanistan on a map, much less knew what vileness the Taliban was up to.
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BOOKS
March 7, 2004 | Susan Griffin, Susan Griffin is the author of several books, including "A Chorus of Stones" and, most recently, "The Book of the Courtesans."
On the surface, "Meena, Heroine of Afghanistan" is a very simple book. Since this account of the life of the founder of the Revolutionary Assn. of the Women of Afghanistan, or RAWA, is told for girls as well as women, the style is conventional and direct. Yet the narrative will provide a profoundly moving experience for readers of any age.
SPORTS
May 3, 2009 | T.J. SIMERS
As you know, every man, woman and child in this country has heard, and probably heard again, every Tom Lasorda story. But Lasorda is tireless, if not relentless. He's also dedicated, and while most folks at age 81 have to debate with their own body to get going every day, Lasorda was flying to Washington, D.C., on to Ireland, then Cairo, and Pakistan -- putting on helmet and flak jacket and switching to a helicopter for the rocky jaunt to Iraq and Afghanistan.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
The first time Laura Bush traveled to Europe, she was just out of college and on one of those seven-day, 17-country trips by bus and train. She returns next week by Air Force jet for an official tour of Paris, Hungary and the Czech Republic with her daughter Jenna. Laura Bush, who leaves Monday for 10 days on her first international mission without her husband, wants to highlight U.S.-led efforts to rebuild Afghanistan.
SPORTS
May 3, 2009 | T.J. SIMERS
As you know, every man, woman and child in this country has heard, and probably heard again, every Tom Lasorda story. But Lasorda is tireless, if not relentless. He's also dedicated, and while most folks at age 81 have to debate with their own body to get going every day, Lasorda was flying to Washington, D.C., on to Ireland, then Cairo, and Pakistan -- putting on helmet and flak jacket and switching to a helicopter for the rocky jaunt to Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
November 18, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Seeking to draw attention to the treatment of women and children in Afghanistan, the White House assigned President Bush's weekly Saturday radio address to First Lady Laura Bush, who said the war on terrorism was "a fight for the rights and dignity of women."
OPINION
December 7, 2011 | By Eric Berkowitz
The story of Gulnaz, a young Afghan woman who was raped and then jailed for having sex out of wedlock, has once again drawn international attention to Afghanistan's legal system and its institutionalized discrimination against women. After giving birth in prison to her attacker's child, Gulnaz, who goes by a single name, was eventually pardoned, perhaps because news of her plight was reported by a documentary filmmaker. But to win her freedom, she had to agree to marry her rapist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2001
Re "Training Camp of Another Kind," Oct. 15: While the powers that be struggle to decide which of the existing bad guys should eventually be entrusted with the future of Afghanistan--trying, for once, to back the right horse--they seem to have all but ignored the obvious answer. How about giving the women a chance? While the men are teaching their sons to handle automatic weapons, the Revolutionary Assn. of the Women of Afghanistan has been teaching their daughters to handle a pen. Afghanistan has seen more than its share of misdirected testosterone and misogynist warriors, a horror it has now shared with the rest of the world.
NEWS
August 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Saying Islam completely forbids women working, Afghanistan's hard-line Taliban regime shut down bakeries run by widows, who are among the country's poorest of the poor. The bakeries were started by the United Nations World Food Program and allowed widows to be paid salaries to make bread that was sold at a subsidized price to other widows. The order left 350 women without jobs, said Peter Goossens, country director for the WFP.
BOOKS
March 7, 2004 | Susan Griffin, Susan Griffin is the author of several books, including "A Chorus of Stones" and, most recently, "The Book of the Courtesans."
On the surface, "Meena, Heroine of Afghanistan" is a very simple book. Since this account of the life of the founder of the Revolutionary Assn. of the Women of Afghanistan, or RAWA, is told for girls as well as women, the style is conventional and direct. Yet the narrative will provide a profoundly moving experience for readers of any age.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
The first time Laura Bush traveled to Europe, she was just out of college and on one of those seven-day, 17-country trips by bus and train. She returns next week by Air Force jet for an official tour of Paris, Hungary and the Czech Republic with her daughter Jenna. Laura Bush, who leaves Monday for 10 days on her first international mission without her husband, wants to highlight U.S.-led efforts to rebuild Afghanistan.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
LARAMIE, Wyo. - Every year, the day sneaks on up Judy Shepard to deliver its sucker punch from the past: The 12th of October. The day Matthew died. "It hits you and you say to yourself: Oh, this is the day," she says. "This is why I feel so terrible. " Fifteen years ago this week, gay college student Matthew Shepard was pistol-whipped and left for dead: unconscious, barely alive, lashed to a jagged wooden fence outside this small prairie city by two men disgusted by his homosexuality.
TRAVEL
January 13, 2002
I was surprised by Susan Spano's question ("Writers Who Have Gone Before Us Evoke Afghanistan's Past and Present," Her World, Jan. 6). She asks, "How much more dangerous, demoralized and dilapidated must it be now, after U.S. bombing, the exodus of millions of Afghans to neighboring countries and the demise of the Taliban?" Because of the demise of the Taliban, I would imagine that the women of Afghanistan would feel liberated, energized and full of hope for their future. ENO CLEVERINGA Newbury Park
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