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BUSINESS
January 19, 2000 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Look for a new Women's Business Resource Center to open later this month in downtown Los Angeles. The center, which is being launched by the Los Angeles chapter of the National Assn. of Women Business Owners, will be in the Westin Bonaventure Hotel. It will offer free and low-cost business service to a variety of women business owners, including those from low-income communities. Resources will include a technology center, a meeting facility and a business library.
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BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
The number of businesses owned by women in the United States has increased 59% since 1997, according to an estimate from American Express. Those 8.6 million firms are generating more than $1.3 trillion in revenue and employing nearly 7.8 million people, according to the 2013 State of Women-Owned Businesses Report from American Express Open, a small-business arm of the company. California leads the nation with an estimated 1.1 million businesses owned by women, employing 983,000 people and generating about $198 million in sales, according to the report.
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BUSINESS
August 16, 2010 | By Cyndia Zwahlen
In 1994, Congress passed a law requiring that a minimum of 5% of the money spent on government contracts go to the nation's businesses that are majority-owned by women. That was great news for women who believed they had never received a fair share of those contracts. But the government didn't reach that mandated goal, and six years later Congress passed the Equity in Contracting for Women Act to give women-owned businesses more traction getting federal contracts. That program was never implemented.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2010 | By Cyndia Zwahlen
In 1994, Congress passed a law requiring that a minimum of 5% of the money spent on government contracts go to the nation's businesses that are majority-owned by women. That was great news for women who believed they had never received a fair share of those contracts. But the government didn't reach that mandated goal, and six years later Congress passed the Equity in Contracting for Women Act to give women-owned businesses more traction getting federal contracts. That program was never implemented.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1998
Women looking for help starting or expanding a business can turn to a new support and networking Web site unveiled this week. The Online Women's Business Center (http://www.onlinewbc.org) will cull information nationwide from 60 regional business Web sites to provide women entrepreneurs financial, management and marketing information. Operated by the U.S.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1998 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Black women entrepreneurs have more trouble getting capital than their counterparts in other ethnic groups, a study released today showed. Only 38% of black women business owners had bank credit, compared with 60% of their white counterparts, 50% of Latinas, 45% of Asians and 42% of Native Americans.
NEWS
October 1, 2000 | Associated Press
Women with graduate degrees from business schools say a lack of female role models discourages many other women from pursuing MBAs. Other significant obstacles include not enough encouragement by employers and the incompatibility of balancing work and family with their education, according to a survey conducted by the University of Michigan and Catalyst, a New York-based organization that promotes women in industry.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1993 | From Associated Press
The number of American companies owned or controlled by women has grown to the point where they now employ more people than do all the Fortune 500 companies, according to a magazine report on women in business. In its May issue, Working Woman magazine released its second annual list of leading women business owners, which profiles 50 women who have started, taken over or inherited companies. Their companies are ranked by annual revenue.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1992 | CAROL SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joline Godfrey of Ojai has a solution for the "glass ceiling" that's keeping women from being fully represented in the top echelons of corporate America: Forget trying to break it down, get out from under it instead. Godfrey, 42, is the author of "Our Wildest Dreams: Women Entrepreneurs Making Money, Having Fun, Doing Good" (HarperCollins, 1992), which is cementing her role as one of the most visible spokeswomen for a growing movement--women who have gone into business for themselves.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1991 | ANNE MICHAUD
A mother of six wants $3,000 to computerize her business. Groups would share the responsibility for loans, help others find lenders. Marion Malimba, a mother of six and formerly homeless in Orange County, discussed her life softly and articulately with a group gathered on a recent weekday morning at UC Irvine's stately University Club. She said she had lived in 42 hotels with her children, and she had watched them do their homework in parking lots.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2010 | By Karen E. Klein
Dear Karen: I'm a female sole practitioner in the service sector. Do I qualify as a minority small-business owner? Answer: As a sole practitioner, you qualify as a small-business owner under the guidelines of the Small Business Administration. Women-owned businesses are not considered minority-owned, but there are significant financing assistance programs and contracting advantages for certified women-owned businesses. Many resources exist to aid women business owners, such as the SBA's Women's Business Centers, www.sba.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2006 | Robin Givhan, Washington Post
A recent breakfast at the New York Athletic Club celebrating the charitable work of Dress for Success provided the perfect opportunity to glimpse a variety of women in their ideal professional attire. The guests that weekday morning represented a range of industries: media, entertainment, insurance and banking. Almost everyone was wearing a blazer. Some wore traditional pantsuits and others wore skirts with coordinating jackets.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2006 | Gayle Tzemach, Financial Times
When Shahla Nawabi arrived in Kabul to visit her father in 2002, she intended to stay for three months. Now, more than three years later, she is part of an emerging class of female entrepreneurs launching businesses in a nation where women were banned from work and study only five years ago.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By 2002, more than a third of all women-owned firms in California will be owned by women of color, nearly twice the national average, a survey to be released today shows. California's 35% of minority-woman business ownership is up from 27% in 1996 and tops the national average of 20%. It's a higher proportion than any state except Hawaii, where 60% of the women-owned firms are owned by women of color, according to the Washington-based Center for Women's Business Research.
NEWS
October 1, 2000 | Associated Press
Women with graduate degrees from business schools say a lack of female role models discourages many other women from pursuing MBAs. Other significant obstacles include not enough encouragement by employers and the incompatibility of balancing work and family with their education, according to a survey conducted by the University of Michigan and Catalyst, a New York-based organization that promotes women in industry.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2000 | MICHAEL LIEDTKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Only 2% of the money invested by venture capital firms goes to women-owned businesses, according to a survey released today by the National Foundation for Women Business Owners. About 38% of U.S. businesses are owned by women, yet women-owned firms represent only 9% of all institutional investment deals, the survey found. "Women business owners still tend to be invisible to venture capitalists," said Sharon Hadary, executive director of the nonprofit research firm in Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When, after several days of trying, Madam C. J. Walker was finally allowed to speak at a 1912 convention of mostly male business owners, she described herself as a woman who started in the cotton fields of the South, was promoted to the washtub and finally promoted herself into manufacturing. Walker, the first female African American millionaire, just got another promotion: onto a first-class U.S. postage stamp. The 21st stamp in the U.S.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Players at the Tustin Ranch Golf Course may see a lot of Junko Horii during the next couple of weeks as the Japanese businesswoman spends hours at the driving range practicing her swing. She may look like she's practicing as if her job depended on it. And it just might. Later this month, Horii, owner of a small Irvine insurance brokerage, has scheduled a golf game with top executives of several large Japanese companies.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2000 | DENISE GELLENE and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles chapter of the National Assn. of Women Business Owners will induct 23 Southern California entrepreneurs into its Hall of Fame at its upcoming luncheon March 24. The women being honored have owned their businesses at least since the 1970s. Collectively they generate more than $500 million in annual sales and employ more than 10,000 workers. The honorees: Kathy Aaronson, CEO of the Sales Athlete Inc.; Gloria Allred of Allred, Maroko & Goldberg; Jane Arnault, of JurEcon Inc.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2000 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Look for a new Women's Business Resource Center to open later this month in downtown Los Angeles. The center, which is being launched by the Los Angeles chapter of the National Assn. of Women Business Owners, will be in the Westin Bonaventure Hotel. It will offer free and low-cost business service to a variety of women business owners, including those from low-income communities. Resources will include a technology center, a meeting facility and a business library.
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