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HEALTH
October 8, 2001 | SUSAN OKIE, WASHINGTON POST
A newly identified, antibiotic-resistant strain of a common bacterium is contributing to an increase in relatively hard-to-treat bladder infections in women in at least three U.S. cities, according to a study published Thursday. Genetic analysis and other laboratory tests pinpointed the strain of Escherichia coli bacteria as the culprit in a substantial percentage of drug-resistant urinary tract infections among female university students in Berkeley, Minneapolis and Ann Arbor, Mich.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2013 | Robin Abcarian
A word of caution: If you are a woman of child-bearing age, Catholic hospitals may be hazardous to your health. Why? Because Catholic-affiliated hospitals, which now account for one of every nine acute-care hospital beds in the country, aren't allowed to provide the medically accepted standard of care if it conflicts with Catholic teachings. This can include denying a rape victim morning-after pills. Or refusing to give abortions for ectopic or molar pregnancies, which are not viable and may threaten the mother's health or life.
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NEWS
July 9, 1998 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to resolve a tortuous and costly legal battle, Dow Corning Corp. reached a tentative agreement with negotiators for women with silicone breast implants Wednesday to pay $3.2 billion to settle claims by more than 170,000 women that the implants harmed their health. The settlement would compensate women based on the seriousness of injury they claim, providing up to $300,000 for those who have a severely debilitating illness.
OPINION
February 13, 2013 | Patt Morrison
And now, she is the patient. For decades, as a surgeon, researcher, professor and medical celebrity of sorts, Susan Love has led the charge against breast cancer and for women's health. She served on President Clinton's cancer advisory board. She set up a research foundation. Her book on breast cancer is on the short shelf for clinicians and counselors. And last June, when, like so many women, she was feeling and doing fine, the diagnosis came. Except it wasn't breast cancer but leukemia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1995
UCLA Medical Center will begin a three-year study of women in the South Bay next week to help build a database on women's health issues during midlife. The study is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, which is using seven clinical centers throughout the country to conduct a multiethnic study of women. The study will focus on 450 Japanese American, Japanese-born and white women ages 40 to 55. Greendale said that UCLA is concentrating on Gardena, where many Japanese Americans reside.
NEWS
March 8, 1995 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Research in women's health is poised to make large gains in the near future due to years of steadfast lobbying for more studies on such diseases as breast cancer, ovarian cancer and osteoporosis. But doctors still have very little concrete advice on how to prevent some of these major killers, experts acknowledged Monday at "Women and Doctors," the second annual briefing on women's health at the Century Plaza Hotel.
NEWS
March 31, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
The state Assembly gave final passage Monday to a bill granting women in managed health care plans direct access to obstetricians and gynecologists. The legislation, which allows women in such plans to bypass their primary care physicians to receive care, goes to Gov. Pete Wilson. It has Wilson's approval "in concept," a spokeswoman for the governor said. The measure (AB 12) by Assemblywoman Susan A.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Operating for less than two months out of a borrowed office, with a part-time director, a temporary staff and one purloined secretary, the new Office for Research on Women's Health at the National Institutes of Health is nonetheless "off and running," altering the way medical research is conducted for at least half of the population. The creation of the office, announced Sept.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Genetic factors play a major role in the development of alcoholism in women, contrary to the findings of many previous studies, a Virginia researcher said Tuesday. The new findings also indicate that alcoholism is becoming more common in women, probably as a result of relaxation of cultural inhibitions.
HEALTH
January 12, 1998 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Recruitment for the Women's Health Initiative, the largest study ever on issues pertaining to women's health, will close on time at the end of the month, according to government health officials. The study, which began recruiting women in 1994, has enrolled more than 130,000 post-menopausal women nationwide and will meet its recruitment goals, says Dr. Jacques Rossouw, project officer for the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
DENVER - President Obama on Wednesday cast Republican Mitt Romney as a throwback to the 1950s on issues related to women's health in a speech aimed at winning women's votes in a key battleground. “When it comes to a woman's right to make her own healthcare choices, they want to take us back to the policies more suited to the 1950s than the 21st century,” he said, taking direct aim at his rival. “Mr. Romney's running as the candidate of conservative values. There's nothing conservative about a government that prevents a woman from making her own healthcare decisions.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- A federal appeals court in New Orleans is expected to hear arguments Thursday over the legality of implementing a Texas rule that bans Planned Parenthoodclinics from a state and federally funded health program for uninsured, low-income women. “What's at stake is whether low-income women will be able to access healthcare services,” Melaney Linton, president and chief executive of Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast in Houston, told The Times. “It's virtually impossible for other health centers to pick up the clients that were served under this program by Planned Parenthood.” The TexasWomen's HealthProgram last year had a budget of $41 million, about $13 million of it for Planned Parenthood clinics and about 90% of the money from the federal government.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Paul West
DALE CITY, Va. -- Addressing Obama campaign volunteers in a swing suburb of a top battleground state, First Lady Michelle Obama delivered a pitch tailored to female voters, a group that strategists for both sides consider the crucial demographic in the fight for Virginia's 13 electoral votes. Obama spoke at length about her own family and also referred to military families, an important voter group in the state. She touted the benefits for women of the economic recovery, which has reduced unemployment in Virginia to the lowest level of the nation's 20 most populous states.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- President Obama on Friday castigated the Republican Party for what he said were dated views onwomen's healthissues, saying the recent debate over contraceptives was "like being in a time machine. "  Speaking at a women's conference organized by his campaign, Obama called the issue "illuminating. " "Republicans in Congress were going so far as to say an employer should be able to have a say in the healthcare decisions of its female employees," Obama said. "I'm always puzzled by this -- this is a party that says it prides itself on being rabidly anti-regulation.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro and Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
Senate Republicans, who narrowly lost a bid to roll back new federal insurance rules requiring contraceptive coverage, were decidedly circumspect after being portrayed by Democrats as trying to interfere with women's health options. "I don't have anything else to say," said Sen. John McCain(R-Ariz.), after the GOP's effort Thursday to curb the rule failed 51 to 48. Other Republicans were only a bit more talkative, and they quickly shifted their remarks to the other issues - jobs and the economy - suggesting that the contraception fight may have waning appeal for the GOP. "It was a good vote, but we do need to be focused on some of these debt issues - they're just huge," said Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.)
HEALTH
February 2, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
As the backlash grew against the decision by Susan G. Komen for the Curefoundation to cease awarding grants to Planned Parenthood, Komen officials ended two days of silence on Thursday and tried to manage the uproar. In a conference call with the media, Komen founder and Chief Executive Nancy G. Brinker said the decision was due to policy changes intended to improve how grantees are selected. It had nothing to do with Planned Parenthood's position as an abortion provider, she said.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government said Friday that it plans to conduct the most sweeping study of women's health problems ever attempted, with hundreds of thousands of women participating in a research effort expected to cost $500 million over 10 years. The project is the brainchild of the new director of the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Bernadine Healy, who said that it would be "the most definitive, far-reaching study of women's health ever undertaken in the United States, if not the world."
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Planned Parenthood on Wednesday filed a lawsuit against a Washington drugstore chain, arguing that employers whose insurance plans exclude contraceptives but cover other prescription drugs are in effect practicing sex discrimination. The lawsuit, filed in federal district court in Seattle, signals a new front in what is becoming a battleground over women's health issues in state legislatures and on Capitol Hill.
HEALTH
April 5, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Although many women have sworn off hormone therapy, a new analysis from the clinical trial that first unearthed the hormones' risks shows taking estrogen alone for menopausal symptoms, even for several years, may be safer than first thought. The new finding — the latest from the Women's Health Initiative, a federally funded trial that tracked thousands of women taking hormones or placebo pills for years — looked at women who have had hysterectomies and thus can take estrogen unaccompanied by another hormone, progestin.
OPINION
December 2, 2009 | By Barbara Ehrenreich
Has feminism been replaced by the pink-ribbon breast cancer cult? When the House passed the Stupak amendment, which would take away abortion rights from women who get any government help purchasing insurance, the female response ranged from muted to inaudible. Soon after, when the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended that regular screening mammography not start until age 50, all hell broke loose. Sheryl Crowe, Whoopi Goldberg and Olivia Newton-John raised their voices in protest; a few dozen non-boldface women picketed the Department of Health and Human Services.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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