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Women Owned Business

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1990
The Los Angeles City Council on Friday approved a plan aimed at ensuring the "integrity" of a program that was designed to aid disadvantaged minorities and women but has come under fire for benefitting political insiders. The council's unanimous vote will force all women-run and minority-owned businesses that want to become involved in the city's affirmative-action program to first be certified by the Office of Contract Administration, a branch of the Department of Public Works.
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BUSINESS
July 13, 1990 | MIKE KRENSAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Women are starting small businesses at twice the rate of men. If they maintain that pace, women will own nearly 40% of small businesses by the year 2000, according to the Small Business Administration. "It's a trend that's going to continue for a number of reasons," said Kris Morris, a partner with the executive search firm Cowen, Morris, Berger. Morris and other observers attribute the growth to a contraction of middle management and expansion of the number of women entering the work force.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
Small businesses owned by Anglo males had far greater revenues than those owned by minorities and women during the 1980s economic boom, a Census Bureau report said Wednesday. Anglo males' small businesses on average had $189,000 in receipts in 1987, more than double the average for owners from any other group except Asian-Pacific Islander males. "I think some of it has to do with the industries they're in," said Donna McCutcheon, the survey manager.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1990 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief of minority contracting for the Southern California Rapid Transit District was ordered Friday to recommend reforms in a federally mandated program intended to steer transit construction work to disadvantaged businesses, and to explain why the program has not been more aggressively monitored by the RTD. RTD President Nikolas Patsaouras ordered Walter Norwood, head of the district's office of economic opportunity, to prepare recommendations for...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1992 | AMY PYLE
Los Angeles County will hold five hearings this month--two of them in the San Fernando Valley--to gather information about the county's track record in contracting with minority- and women-owned businesses. In particular, the county is seeking information from businesses hired by the county relating to their experiences in dealing with the government bureaucracy through the bidding and contracting process.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1994 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juana Choque, a 39-year-old woman who migrated to La Paz from rural Bolivia, recently got the first bank loan of her life, $100 to expand her sidewalk vending business. "I want to become a big businesswoman, like the other senoras ," said Choque with a gleam in her eye. In a country where annual income averages $800, the loan could go a long way toward helping Choque expand her inventory of fresh vegetables, even enable her to rent a second sentaje, or vending site.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1999 | CYNDIA ZWAHLE
If the thought of working for your dad makes your palms sweat, imagine if he handed you control of his multimillion-dollar company just before the bottom dropped out of the economy. For Marcia Huntley, 47, president of a steel pipe manufacturing company in Los Angeles and daughter of the now-retired owner, it turned into a nightmare of sleepless nights, agonizing layoffs and rebuffed attempts to resign.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1993 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caltrans, the state highway agency that froze all contracts with outside design consultants a month ago, has decided to discontinue its four-year effort to let the private sector handle part of its workload. The decision by the California Department of Transportation is expected to put hundreds of architects, engineers and surveyors throughout the state out of work and force many small companies--especially those run by minorities and women--out of business.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1999 | LEE ROMNEY and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The city of Los Angeles has launched a program to help minority- and women-owned businesses and other small ventures get a slice of increasingly inaccessible city mega-contracts. LA OPS--Los Angeles Opportunities for Procurement and Services--was modeled after the city's Minority Business Opportunity Committee (MBOC), which serves the public and private sectors.
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