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HEALTH
February 20, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
It's an annual rite most women would prefer to skip: a trip to the doctor for a checkup that includes shedding every stitch of clothing, donning a paper gown, placing feet in metal stirrups and enduring a pelvic exam. For a healthy adult woman, the exam typically doesn't hurt. However it can be uncomfortable, cold, embarrassing, time-consuming and, perhaps, unnecessary. Some doctors are beginning to question the need for every woman to have the exam every year. One of them is Dr. Carolyn L. Westhoff, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Columbia University.
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HEALTH
March 18, 2011 | By Marni Jameson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Birth control pills may get a pass when it comes to causing weight gain ? at least according to most research ? but not injectable birth control. Currently, more than 2 million U.S. women, including 400,000 teens, rely on a once-a-month shot ? known as Depo-Provera, or DMPA ? as their method of birth control. But the shots, which the Food and Drug Administration approved for contraceptive use in 2004 and which offer a relatively inexpensive and highly effective method of pregnancy prevention, can trigger substantial weight gain.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Barbara Seaman, a writer and health activist whose groundbreaking 1969 book that warned against the dangers of the birth control pill is widely credited with launching the modern women's health movement, has died. She was 72. Seaman died of lung cancer Wednesday at her New York City home, said her son, Noah Seaman. In her first book, "The Doctors' Case Against the Pill," Seaman exposed the serious and little-known side effects of the high-estrogen pill prescribed at the time.
HEALTH
February 20, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
It's an annual rite most women would prefer to skip: a trip to the doctor for a checkup that includes shedding every stitch of clothing, donning a paper gown, placing feet in metal stirrups and enduring a pelvic exam. For a healthy adult woman, the exam typically doesn't hurt. However it can be uncomfortable, cold, embarrassing, time-consuming and, perhaps, unnecessary. Some doctors are beginning to question the need for every woman to have the exam every year. One of them is Dr. Carolyn L. Westhoff, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Columbia University.
HEALTH
October 22, 2007 | Reuters
Most U.S. states have made little progress toward improving women's health and many have fallen behind as rates of obesity and diabetes continue to climb, a new 50-state report released Wednesday showed. "The nation as a whole and individual states are falling farther behind in the quest to meet the national goals for women's health," said Judy Waxman of the National Women's Law Center, which released the report along with the Oregon Health & Science University.
HEALTH
May 1, 2000 | MARLA BOLOTSKY
Sounds simple enough. You're a woman who wants personal health information or a man who wants to learn more about a loved one's health condition. Just go to your favorite search engine and type in "women's health," right? Well, brace yourself. That method can turn up hundreds of thousands of sites. And, the reality is, you may never find the site that offers precisely the information you're seeking. But here are some noteworthy ones that provide high-quality, current women's health content.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1995
UCLA Medical Center will begin a three-year study of women in the South Bay next week to help build a database on women's health issues during midlife. The study is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, which is using seven clinical centers throughout the country to conduct a multiethnic study of women. The study will focus on 450 Japanese American, Japanese-born and white women ages 40 to 55. Greendale said that UCLA is concentrating on Gardena, where many Japanese Americans reside.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | Compiled from wire-service reports
Why are pesticides potentially more harmful to women than to men? The differences are caused by female hormones like estrogen and the physiological changes brought on by menstruation and menopause, according to medical experts who attended a recent Washington seminar on women's health and the environment. Interaction of these factors with toxins can lead to a range of disorders from cancer to chronic fatigue syndrome, they said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1995
I would like to respond to "Exposing Medicine's Sex-Bias Hoax" (Commentary, April 3). While I agree with the author's conclusion that our goal should be to increase federal support for all biomedical research, I take offense at his suggestion that such research is undermined by more attention to women's health concerns. It is especially misleading to compare federal funding for research on breast cancer with prostate cancer in order to suggest that women are benefiting at the expense of men. In fact the latest figures show that the vast majority of federal funding for research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
NEWS
November 10, 1989
Traditionally, the medical management of women's health has left something to be desired. Compared to the care and consideration given men, women have had to take a back seat in health care. The "little-known" killer of women referred to in your article was well-known throughout the decades. Women, however, have been treated like children by our esteemed medical practitioners. Even today, a woman patient is addressed by her first name when meeting a new physician in a medical setting.
NEWS
January 31, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Women who don't have mammograms may have various reasons why they skip the test, according to a study, including fearing the pain they may experience and being too busy. Researchers from Kaiser Permanente looked at data on 340 women who completed a survey about breast cancer screenings. Almost a quarter of the women said that "too much pain" was an obstacle to getting a mammogram. Obese women were more likely than non-obese women to say that pain was a barrier to getting tested. Feeling embarrassed about having a mammogram was another reason women didn't go, although obese women weren't more likely to mention that as a factor than were non-obese women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Barbara Seaman, a writer and health activist whose groundbreaking 1969 book that warned against the dangers of the birth control pill is widely credited with launching the modern women's health movement, has died. She was 72. Seaman died of lung cancer Wednesday at her New York City home, said her son, Noah Seaman. In her first book, "The Doctors' Case Against the Pill," Seaman exposed the serious and little-known side effects of the high-estrogen pill prescribed at the time.
HEALTH
October 22, 2007 | Reuters
Most U.S. states have made little progress toward improving women's health and many have fallen behind as rates of obesity and diabetes continue to climb, a new 50-state report released Wednesday showed. "The nation as a whole and individual states are falling farther behind in the quest to meet the national goals for women's health," said Judy Waxman of the National Women's Law Center, which released the report along with the Oregon Health & Science University.
NATIONAL
September 1, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
The head of the Food and Drug Administration's women's health office resigned Wednesday in a widening protest over delays in deciding whether the "morning after" contraceptive could be sold without a prescription. Susan F.
HEALTH
May 9, 2005 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to health, women are constantly scanning their surroundings for signs of trouble, ready with the cough syrup, the thermometer, the doctor's phone number should a target come up on the radar. "Need-seeking devices," Dr. Ana E. Nunez, an internist and director of the women's health education program at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, calls them. "We are socialized to find out what others need and to provide it," she says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2001
We agree that "the makeup of the eventual new government" in Afghanistan is of immediate and primary importance and we applaud the call for a meeting in Geneva "with invitations to all groups" to create a new and inclusive Afghan government ("A Post-Taliban Plan, Now," editorial, Nov. 13). However, the next regime must represent not only "all regions and ethnic groups" of Afghanistan, but also the largest subset of the Afghan population--and the group that has suffered the most under the Taliban's five-year reign--the nation's women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1992
A new study shows that women who work outside the home may enjoy better health than those who don't. What about the popular image of women who enter the male-dominated workplace falling victim to ulcers or keeling over from heart attacks? As it turns out, more opportunities for women in the working world seem not to translate into more opportunities for poor health. Researchers at UC San Diego tracked 242 white women in Rancho Bernardo, a San Diego suburb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1997
I am extremely infuriated that Jack Miller, head of Orange County's Environmental Health Division, has decided to terminate the inspection program for mammography facilities in Orange County and turn it over to the state (July 24). The program has been successful for 34 years. The prospect of having to deal with some bureaucrat in Sacramento when a problem arises is alarming. I strongly protest the decision to end the program and will fight to keep local control. Women's health has been placed on the back burner for too long.
HEALTH
July 30, 2001
www.latimes.com/health Health discussions: How's your health? If you'd like to chat with others about the latest news on personal health, medicine and fitness, check out the discussion site at http://www.latimes.com/features/health/discuss. Special reports: Past special reports on health and medical topics such as autism, aging, hearing and women's health are available at http://www.latimes.com/features/health/reports.
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