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NEWS
January 31, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Women who don't have mammograms may have various reasons why they skip the test, according to a study, including fearing the pain they may experience and being too busy. Researchers from Kaiser Permanente looked at data on 340 women who completed a survey about breast cancer screenings. Almost a quarter of the women said that "too much pain" was an obstacle to getting a mammogram. Obese women were more likely than non-obese women to say that pain was a barrier to getting tested. Feeling embarrassed about having a mammogram was another reason women didn't go, although obese women weren't more likely to mention that as a factor than were non-obese women.
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HEALTH
May 1, 2000 | MARLA BOLOTSKY
Sounds simple enough. You're a woman who wants personal health information or a man who wants to learn more about a loved one's health condition. Just go to your favorite search engine and type in "women's health," right? Well, brace yourself. That method can turn up hundreds of thousands of sites. And, the reality is, you may never find the site that offers precisely the information you're seeking. But here are some noteworthy ones that provide high-quality, current women's health content.
HEALTH
June 11, 2001
www.latimes.com/health * Health discussions: How's your health? If you'd like to chat with others about the latest news on personal health, medicine and fitness, check out the discussion site at http://www.latimes.com/health/discuss. * Special reports: Past special reports on health and medical topics such as autism, aging, hearing and women's health are available at http://www.latimes.com/health/reports.
NEWS
June 28, 1994 | SHARI ROAN, Times Health Editor
Doctors have been warning men for years that exploding with anger over trivial events--such as some jerk cutting you off on the San Bernardino--is not good for your health. This classic, Type A behavior tends to land men in the cardiac-care ward. But what about women? Is going ballistic bad for their health? Or is it healthier to be a polite lady and keep your anger to yourself? Neither, say the authors of intriguing new research on women and anger.
HEALTH
March 18, 2011 | By Marni Jameson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Birth control pills may get a pass when it comes to causing weight gain ? at least according to most research ? but not injectable birth control. Currently, more than 2 million U.S. women, including 400,000 teens, rely on a once-a-month shot ? known as Depo-Provera, or DMPA ? as their method of birth control. But the shots, which the Food and Drug Administration approved for contraceptive use in 2004 and which offer a relatively inexpensive and highly effective method of pregnancy prevention, can trigger substantial weight gain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Barbara Seaman, a writer and health activist whose groundbreaking 1969 book that warned against the dangers of the birth control pill is widely credited with launching the modern women's health movement, has died. She was 72. Seaman died of lung cancer Wednesday at her New York City home, said her son, Noah Seaman. In her first book, "The Doctors' Case Against the Pill," Seaman exposed the serious and little-known side effects of the high-estrogen pill prescribed at the time.
HEALTH
May 9, 2005 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to health, women are constantly scanning their surroundings for signs of trouble, ready with the cough syrup, the thermometer, the doctor's phone number should a target come up on the radar. "Need-seeking devices," Dr. Ana E. Nunez, an internist and director of the women's health education program at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, calls them. "We are socialized to find out what others need and to provide it," she says.
SCIENCE
August 13, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
“Fifty Shades of Grey” isn't just a fun, racy read, according to a new study  that finds the bestseller glamorizes violence against women.  Analyzing the naughty novel, psychologists at Michigan State University and Ohio State University concluded that its characters' behaviors are consistent with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's official definition of intimate partner violence - and that the book perpetuates dangerous abuse...
SCIENCE
June 20, 2013 | By Amina Khan
The Food and Drug Administration has approved over-the-counter use of an emergency contraceptive called Plan B One-Step for use by all women and girls who can potentially bear children, no matter how young, the agency announced Thursday. But the move does not approve similar non-prescription use for other generic emergency contraceptives. The FDA says it "has fulfilled its commitment" with a court order issued by U.S. District Judge Edward Korman, according to an agency release.
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