Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWomen S Health
IN THE NEWS

Women S Health

HEALTH
June 11, 2001
www.latimes.com/health * Health discussions: How's your health? If you'd like to chat with others about the latest news on personal health, medicine and fitness, check out the discussion site at http://www.latimes.com/health/discuss. * Special reports: Past special reports on health and medical topics such as autism, aging, hearing and women's health are available at http://www.latimes.com/health/reports.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 28, 1994 | SHARI ROAN, Times Health Editor
Doctors have been warning men for years that exploding with anger over trivial events--such as some jerk cutting you off on the San Bernardino--is not good for your health. This classic, Type A behavior tends to land men in the cardiac-care ward. But what about women? Is going ballistic bad for their health? Or is it healthier to be a polite lady and keep your anger to yourself? Neither, say the authors of intriguing new research on women and anger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2000 | JOSH GOLDSTEIN
The Gay & Lesbian Community Center of Ventura will host a Women's Health Symposium on June 24 to boost education about a variety of health topics. The daylong event is a chance for women to gather in a social setting, learn about women's health issues and follow through on tips for a healthy life, said Marcy Sherbok, the center's development director. "We need to learn about ourselves," she said. "The more we know, the more chances we have to live happier, more productive lives."
HEALTH
May 9, 2005 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to health, women are constantly scanning their surroundings for signs of trouble, ready with the cough syrup, the thermometer, the doctor's phone number should a target come up on the radar. "Need-seeking devices," Dr. Ana E. Nunez, an internist and director of the women's health education program at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, calls them. "We are socialized to find out what others need and to provide it," she says.
HEALTH
August 21, 2000
Re "The Abortion Pill: Finally at Hand?" (Aug. 14), what a delightfully well-balanced pair of stories on the latest scheme for women to avoid the inconvenience of giving birth by easily aborting their unwanted offspring with pills. A mere two paragraphs at the end of one story were allotted to "opponents of abortion," while 73 paragraphs matter-of-factly endorsed the controversial new pills and complained that women are being denied this wonder drug to flush their unwanted embryos like so many bowel movements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Barbara Seaman, a writer and health activist whose groundbreaking 1969 book that warned against the dangers of the birth control pill is widely credited with launching the modern women's health movement, has died. She was 72. Seaman died of lung cancer Wednesday at her New York City home, said her son, Noah Seaman. In her first book, "The Doctors' Case Against the Pill," Seaman exposed the serious and little-known side effects of the high-estrogen pill prescribed at the time.
HEALTH
March 18, 2011 | By Marni Jameson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Birth control pills may get a pass when it comes to causing weight gain ? at least according to most research ? but not injectable birth control. Currently, more than 2 million U.S. women, including 400,000 teens, rely on a once-a-month shot ? known as Depo-Provera, or DMPA ? as their method of birth control. But the shots, which the Food and Drug Administration approved for contraceptive use in 2004 and which offer a relatively inexpensive and highly effective method of pregnancy prevention, can trigger substantial weight gain.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Two days after Rush Limbaugh issued a tepid apology to Sandra Fluke, the woman whom he called a “slut” and a “prostitute” for her advocacy for expansion of access to birth control, Fluke dismissed Limbaugh's statement as insufficient. The 30-year-old Georgetown law student noted in a Monday appearance on "The View" that Limbaugh had only apologized for his choice of words, as she sought to refocus the discussion on access to contraceptives being a matter of women's rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- California women will have more access to abortion after Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill Wednesday that allows nurse practitioners and other non-physicians to perform the procedure during the first trimester of pregnancy. Assemblywoman Toni Atkins (D-San Diego) introduced the measure because of concern that there are not enough physicians, especially in rural areas, to meet the needs of women who desire an abortion. “Timely access to reproductive health services is critical to women's health,” Atkins said in a statement.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|