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June 11, 1989 | Susan Levine, Levine is the author of "Labor's True Woman: Carpet Weavers, Industrialization, and Labor Reform in the Gilded Age" (Temple University Press) and is currently a Rockefeller Humanist-in-Residence at the Duke-UNC Center for Research on Women.
As I sat down to review Sara Evans' new history of women in America, "Born for Liberty," a recent television docudrama came to mind. The story of Jessica McClure, the little girl who fell into an abandoned well in her aunt's back yard, at first glance seems far removed from a scholarly text, albeit highly readable and engaging, written by one of the important pioneers in the field of women's history. Yet, the film's theme, the spirit of voluntarism in American history, resonates with Evans' book except for one particular--the conspicuously minor role for women in the televised account of citizen response to crisis.
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OPINION
April 14, 2007
Re "The ERA: still a bad idea," Current, April 8 Even after three years of law school and 10 years of practice, I am completely baffled by Phyllis Schlafly's analysis of the 1972 Equal Rights Amendment. On its face, the amendment did no more than prohibit the denial or abridgement of rights based on gender. Yet Schlafly insists that it "would actually have taken away some of women's rights." Nonsense. The ERA harbors no potential to subject women to military conscription (even assuming Congress were to reinstate the draft)
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NEWS
March 25, 1993 | ANNE KLARNER
Who was the first woman surgeon general? Come on, you know. It was what's her name . . . uh . . . Dr. Antonia Novello! President Bush appointed her in November, 1989, when C. Everett Koop stepped down. Can you answer a few more like that? Even if you can't, you might still cop a prize if you get on the right team during the Glendale Community College Women's History Month Trivial Pursuit on Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
"ALL women's history is hidden to some degree," says director Mary Harron, whose latest movie, "The Notorious Bettie Page," tells of the famous 1950s pinup who gained notoriety when her bondage and fetish modeling for photographers Irving and Paula Klaw became the focus of Senate hearings led by Estes Kefauver, chairman of the Senate Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency, in 1955.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1999 | Christine Castro, (714) 966-7440
Women who made a difference in the first half of the 20th century will be the focus of a special women's history course beginning next week. The North Orange County Community College District's continuing education program is offering the free six-week course, from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, at the Senior Multi-Service Center. Preregistration is not required. Information: (714) 738-6305.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1997
Earl Ofari Hutchinson was certainly right in saying that black history is virtually unknown ("Black History Is American History," Commentary, Feb. 24). I am strongly in favor of a high school graduation requirement of a semester each of black history and American women's history. Women of all races make up more than half the population of our country. They are making astonishing leaps in education and status, and should be able to look back with respect and pride on their own great heroes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1999
Neither Elizabeth Dole nor Shirley Chisholm was the first woman to run a serious campaign for president (letter, Oct. 26). If women's history were not so invisible, we would have already known that Victoria Woodhull ran in the 1872 presidential election, followed by Belva Lockwood in 1884. These two ran before women even had the right to vote. Talk about heroes! REGINA F. LARK Canoga Park
OPINION
October 15, 2004
Re "3 Quit State History Museum's Board Over Shriver's Proposal," Oct. 13: California is in very bad financial shape. Funding for healthcare and education has been slashed. We are constantly asked to do more with less. Fewer courses are offered to college students. Services for the poor and elderly are cut. I thought I was on the same page as the rest of the state. The exception seems to be the governor's wife. If we cannot fund our current programs, why on earth would Maria Shriver ask for a new museum in the middle of a recession?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1992 | CAITLIN ROTHER
She died nearly a century ago, but poet Emma Lazarus was alive in Camarillo on Monday. Lazarus, whose poem beginning "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses, yearning to breathe free . . ." was immortalized with an inscription on the Statue of Liberty, returned to Camarillo by proxy to tell schoolchildren about women in history.
OPINION
October 15, 2004
Re "3 Quit State History Museum's Board Over Shriver's Proposal," Oct. 13: California is in very bad financial shape. Funding for healthcare and education has been slashed. We are constantly asked to do more with less. Fewer courses are offered to college students. Services for the poor and elderly are cut. I thought I was on the same page as the rest of the state. The exception seems to be the governor's wife. If we cannot fund our current programs, why on earth would Maria Shriver ask for a new museum in the middle of a recession?
NEWS
September 19, 2004 | Ben Dobbin, Associated Press Writer
In the parlor of the red-brick house where Susan B. Anthony was arrested for daring to vote in 1872, an ankle-high petticoat mirror draws puzzled looks from visitors. On cue, docent Eileen King delivers a wry primer on Victorian decorum. "In those days, when you went out, you would stand in front of the mirror and make sure your ankles didn't show, because ankles are the portholes to desire," said King, a volunteer at the museum that chronicles the no-nonsense suffragist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1999
Neither Elizabeth Dole nor Shirley Chisholm was the first woman to run a serious campaign for president (letter, Oct. 26). If women's history were not so invisible, we would have already known that Victoria Woodhull ran in the 1872 presidential election, followed by Belva Lockwood in 1884. These two ran before women even had the right to vote. Talk about heroes! REGINA F. LARK Canoga Park
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1999 | Christine Castro, (714) 966-7440
Women who made a difference in the first half of the 20th century will be the focus of a special women's history course beginning next week. The North Orange County Community College District's continuing education program is offering the free six-week course, from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, at the Senior Multi-Service Center. Preregistration is not required. Information: (714) 738-6305.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1998
* Think Green: Can't make it to Ireland for St. Patrick's Day this week? No worry, because the Irish Times has a St. Patrick's Festival 98 site (http://www.irish-times.com/St.Patricks/) that'll make you feel like you're there. There are discussion boards, polls, pictures from the celebration, a quiz as well as parade and city guides. Be sure to check out the Ireland Abroad section, in which foreign correspondents report on St. Patrick's Day celebrations around the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1998 | LISA ADDISON
WomenFest 98, UC Irvine's fifth annual celebration of Women's History Month, will include events through Thursday. On Tuesday, the UCI Women's Chorus and other student groups will perform and the new dean of humanities, Karen Lawrence, will give a welcome address at noon on the UCI Student Center ATM Stage. An Artisans & Craftswomen's Fair will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday at the Ring Mall, and a discussion about breaking gender barriers in science will be from 2 to 3:30 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was shunned by medical schools, rejected by colleagues and turned away by hospitals. But Elizabeth Blackwell persevered to become the nation's first woman physician, respected and renowned by the time she died at 89 in 1910. Blackwell is one of five famous women in history now being portrayed in schools around Ventura County throughout March to commemorate Women's History Month. "By sheer determination, I had become a good doctor . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1993 | STEPHANIE SIMON
Three teachers and a community activist will receive awards for emphasizing women's history in their work during a 2 p.m. ceremony Saturday in the Preus-Brandt Forum at Cal Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks. Among those honored is Simi Valley resident Marilyn Cameron, a nurse who doubles as an actress, dressing up in historical garb to portray important women from around the world and across the centuries during brief presentations in local schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was shunned by medical schools, rejected by colleagues and turned away by hospitals. But Elizabeth Blackwell persevered to become the nation's first woman physician, respected and renowned by the time she died at 89 in 1910. Blackwell is one of five famous women in history now being portrayed in schools around Ventura County throughout March to commemorate Women's History Month. "By sheer determination, I had become a good doctor . . .
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