Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWomen S Rights
IN THE NEWS

Women S Rights

OPINION
April 14, 2007
Re "The ERA: still a bad idea," Current, April 8 Even after three years of law school and 10 years of practice, I am completely baffled by Phyllis Schlafly's analysis of the 1972 Equal Rights Amendment. On its face, the amendment did no more than prohibit the denial or abridgement of rights based on gender. Yet Schlafly insists that it "would actually have taken away some of women's rights." Nonsense. The ERA harbors no potential to subject women to military conscription (even assuming Congress were to reinstate the draft)
Advertisement
WORLD
February 9, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
At least 565 women and girls in Pakistan died in so-called honor killings in 2006, the country's main rights organization said, nearly double the number it recorded the year before. The privately funded Human Rights Commission of Pakistan said many cases might go unreported, and it previously estimated that the annual total could be about 1,000.
WORLD
February 1, 2007 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
The kiss lasted a few seconds. The morality play it inspired lasted more than six months, riveting Israelis and their legal system on a single question: Did she or didn't she want it? The drama ended Wednesday when the Tel Aviv Magistrates Court ruled that a 21-year-old female army first lieutenant "did not flirt with the accused, did not initiate the kiss and did not consent to it."
WORLD
January 21, 2007 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
EACH morning, the policewoman puts on her uniform, goes to her precinct office, sits behind a bare desk. And waits. She is one of several officers appointed to make it easier for women to report domestic violence. Her job ought to be one of the busiest in the district. Instead, Pushtoon, who goes by one name, has one of the loneliest. "Last week we had one woman.
WORLD
December 10, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Following up on a death threat, Taliban militants broke into a house and fatally shot two teachers and three family members, bringing to 20 the number of educators slain in attacks this year, officials and a relative said Saturday. The attack on two teachers, sisters living in the same house, happened overnight in a village in the eastern province of Kunar, near the border with Pakistan.
WORLD
October 27, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Congress voted as expected Thursday to ban all abortions, including those that could save a mother's life. If signed into law by President Enrique Bolanos, the measure would eliminate a century-old exception to Nicaragua's abortion ban that permits the procedure if three doctors certify that the woman's health is at risk. Fifty-two lawmakers voted for the measure, nine abstained and 29 did not attend the session.
NATIONAL
October 9, 2006 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
In the fight to preserve the toughest abortion ban in the nation, the talk is not of a fetus' right to life. It's of a woman's right to motherhood. Antiabortion activists here deliberately avoid the familiar slogans of their movement. They don't talk about the "murder of innocent babies" or quote the Bible on the sanctity of life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2006 | Lisa Richardson, Times Staff Writer
If there was one moment in time that makes every career woman cringe, it was the heyday of dressing for success with shoulder pads fit for a quarterback and worse -- the little floppy bowtie. It wasn't just a fashion detour, that bowtie, it signaled a wrong turn into imitating men instead of bringing a feminine sensibility to the work world.
WORLD
September 12, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The government agreed to a compromise with hard-line Islamic lawmakers on proposed changes to a law that has long made punishing rapists almost impossible, a legislator said. The widely criticized law, based on Islamic tenets, requires a woman who claims to have been raped to produce four witnesses. A ruling-party lawmaker said the government had agreed to a compromise by letting victims choose between prosecuting under the four-witness rule or under Pakistan's civil penal code.
WORLD
July 11, 2006 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
When a self-taught lawyer and activist named Chen Guangcheng went public with reports of forced abortions and other abuses by family-planning officials in China's Shandong province, he became a local hero. He also became a state threat. Roughly a year later, despite international pressure, widespread support from lawyers and an acknowledgment from national officials that many of his disclosures were accurate, the 35-year-old Chen remains in custody.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|