Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWood Roofs
IN THE NEWS

Wood Roofs

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1989
Your story (Metro, Sept. 29) about the city's recent discovery that only the state has authority to ban flammable wood roofs would be tragic if that were the last word on the subject. Luckily, it is not. I am currently carrying SB 651 in the state Senate, which would accomplish precisely the objective the Los Angeles City Council sought and was unable to do: require that all new buildings have non-combustible roofs, and that old roofs be repaired with treated wood shingles or non-flammable materials when replaced.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2012 | By Maria Hsin, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds of Burbank residents who have yet to comply with a city ordinance that requires them to remove their wood roofs were given some breathing room last week, 20 years after the law was enacted. Homeowners with exposed wood roofs will probably now have two more years to change them. A "roof-over" — a wood shingle or shake roof covered by another type of roofing material — will get an eight-year reprieve. The extensions, coming just months before a 20-year-old August deadline for the replacements, are expected to be finalized by the City Council in the coming weeks.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2012 | By Maria Hsin, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds of Burbank residents who have yet to comply with a city ordinance that requires them to remove their wood roofs were given some breathing room last week, 20 years after the law was enacted. Homeowners with exposed wood roofs will probably now have two more years to change them. A "roof-over" — a wood shingle or shake roof covered by another type of roofing material — will get an eight-year reprieve. The extensions, coming just months before a 20-year-old August deadline for the replacements, are expected to be finalized by the City Council in the coming weeks.
HOME & GARDEN
September 3, 2011 | By Barbara Thornburg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Here in the capital of outdoor living, there is the front yard. And there is the backyard. But an up yard? For interior designer Velvet Hammerschmidt and her husband, software executive Mark Friedman, that was the solution. They loved their modern loft digs in Santa Monica's Commercial Broadway District. Within minutes, they could stroll to their favorite restaurant, browse the boutiques on the Third Street Promenade, watch a mime, stop for a cappuccino. But the desire for a such a metropolitan life also came with a natural longing for, well, nature.
REAL ESTATE
August 12, 1990
Regarding renewed discussions about wood roofs "Fires Fan Wood-Roof Debate" (Aug. 5): I'm from West Texas, where there is nothing to burn in wildfires; however, the type of roof is taken care of there, fairly and equitably, by the fire insurance companies. Those wanting wood roofs must pay higher premiums, sometimes prohibitively high. Why wouldn't this work in California? Consider the burden lifted from city and county officials who must deal with special wood interests. It also appears that in California persons with fire-resistant roofs are forced to subsidize the wood-roof owners by paying higher premiums.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to prevent the type of massive fire damage that devastated Glendale and Santa Barbara this summer, the County Board of Supervisors is prepared to pass an ordinance that fire officials say would effectively ban wood roofs in hillside areas, including parts of the San Gabriel Valley. Three supervisors on the five-member board said last week they will support a recommendation by county Fire Chief P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1989 | LYNN STEINBERG, Times Staff Writer
Tom Nassiri vividly remembers the December morning when flames roared up the canyon behind his home in Porter Ranch. He watched as his wood shake roof, treated with fire retardant just four months earlier, erupted in flames. Then, he said, "this house went up like a bombshell." Like many of his neighbors, Nassiri stayed to rebuild. But today, seven months after the fire that destroyed 15 houses and damaged 25 more, the roof on his Beaufait Avenue home is made of concrete tile--not wood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1989
Seeking to stop a landmark Los Angeles fire safety ordinance, the makers of wood roofing products on Monday asked a federal judge to declare the city's ban on new cedar shake roofs unconstitutional. Lawyers for four shingle manufacturers and the Cedar Shake and Shingle Bureau, a trade organization representing 250 manufacturers of fire-retardant wood shingles, said the ordinance that went into effect on Saturday "unfairly discriminates" against them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A divided Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday refused to support a ban on new wood roofs, despite claims that such a ban could have dramatically reduced losses from recent Southern California fires. The 3-2 vote was strictly along ideological lines, with the board's conservative majority opposing liberal Supervisor Kenneth Hahn's call for state legislation banning new wood roofs throughout California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1989
The Santa Clarita City Council has banned the use of wood shingles and roofs that have not been treated with fire-retardant chemicals. The council unanimously approved an ordinance Tuesday night that outlaws any other roofing material that cannot pass fire safety tests. The measure was developed with the Los Angeles County Fire Department and applies only to new construction. The council declined to ban wood roofs entirely, saying fire-retardant roofs provide sufficient fire protection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2006 | Ashley Surdin, Times Staff Writer
A Simi Valley man's home caught fire Tuesday morning after illegal fireworks landed on his wood-shingled roof, authorities said. Investigators are trying to determine who set off the bottle rockets that destroyed the roof and forced firefighters to drench the home with water, leaving it uninhabitable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2003 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
San Bernardino County fire officials complained Wednesday that their efforts to protect homes near Lake Arrowhead during the recent wildfires were hampered by narrow roads and antiquated building codes that still permitted homes to have wood-shake roofs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2002 | RICHARD FAUSSET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a brush fire raged in the Verdugo Mountains above Glendale and Burbank earlier this month, San Gabriel Fire Department Capt. John Hostetter pointed to the principal source of worry on the evacuated street he had come to protect. It was a wood-shingled roof--tasteful, a tad rustic, and perhaps, if untreated with modern fire retardants, the riskiest feature for a home in a fire hazard area.
REAL ESTATE
April 10, 1994 | KIRSTEN LAGATREE
You may be faced with the decision of whether to remove your old roof or lay the new one on top of it. Tearing off the old roof can be messy, and it can add from several hundred to $2,000 to the total cost of your roof job. But it may be worth it. Mark Vanderslice of Roofing Forensics in Yorba Linda says unequivocally, 'Yes, tear off the old one. Typically you're replacing a roof that's leaking. So it's common to find problems with the structure--dry rot, termite damage and so forth."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
City officials are working with Irvine's homeowner associations to make it easier for residents to replace wood-shake roofs with more fire-resistant materials. The effort, which began earlier this year, has taken on greater urgency since the Laguna Beach firestorm two weeks ago. More than half the homes in Irvine are covered by wood-shake materials, which fire officials say are highly combustible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
The City Council, in its first meeting since firestorms threatened the the city two weeks ago, tonight is scheduled to discuss city regulations relating to wood-shake roofing materials. City officials said they would brief the council on existing fire and building codes and solicit ideas for modifying them. No action will be taken, but council members are expected to express their views on how the city handled the fire crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to prevent the type of fire damage that devastated Glendale and Santa Barbara last summer, Los Angeles County supervisors Thursday ordered the drafting of an ordinance that fire officials say would outlaw new wood roofs in unincorporated hillside neighborhoods. Fire Chief P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1989 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
After every major Southern California fire for the last quarter of a century, Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn has sought a vote on a motion he first introduced in 1961, calling for a ban on wood-shingle roofs. And over and over again, he has been rebuffed by his colleagues amid heavy lobbying from the roofing industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1993
A Los Angeles City Council committee angrily recommended rejection Monday of a request by the manufacturers of wood roof shingles to allow their products to be used in the city. The council's Public Safety Committee voted against altering a city ordinance, approved in 1989, that prohibits the construction of new wood roofs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1993 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
A policy that would have required homeowners to replace wood-shake roofs with another material when re-roofing was rejected by the City Council last week in favor of a less stringent policy. The new policy allows homeowners to replace wood shake with the same type of material and allows wood shake on roofs that don't currently have them. Previously, homeowners were prohibited from replacing other types of roofs with wood shake. Wood shakes have come under attack as being a fire hazard.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|