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Woodstock Festival

ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1994 | NANCY NEVINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Nancy Nevins lives in Laguna Beach and won't be going to Woodstock '94.
That sweltering Friday afternoon, Richie Havens sang, the Swami Satchedenada chanted, and then Sweetwater dealt with the squawking, archaic sound system and cranked out a sweaty 45-minute show. In 1969, we were the first rock group to play at Woodstock. We were first to stumble innocently across the black cables scattered insanely around the makeshift stage, and first to struggle to maintain eye contact across the plywood expanse.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1994 | ERIC SLATER and FRANK MANNING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
She was 22, stoned and dancing on her knees with a boy named Fantuzzi when the photographer from Life magazine captured a glowing Joan Bryant at Woodstock. For many, the grainy black-and-white became a symbol, a summary, of all that was pure and impure about the hippie era: free love, dope and wide-eyed kids searching anywhere and everywhere for a way out of 1950s conservatism and the growing horror in Vietnam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1994 | ERIC SLATER and FRANK MANNING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
She was 22, stoned, and dancing on her knees with a boy named Fantuzzi when the photographer from Life magazine captured a glowing Joan Bryant at Woodstock. For many, the grainy black-and-white became a symbol, a summary, of all that was pure and all that was impure about the hippie era: free love, cheap dope, wide-eyed kids searching anywhere and everywhere for a way out of 1950s conservatism and the growing horror in Vietnam.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1994 | NANCY NEVINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
That sweltering Friday afternoon, Richie Havens sang, the Swami Satchedenada chanted, and then Sweetwater dealt with the squawking, archaic sound system and cranked out a sweaty 45-minute show: We were the first rock group to play at Woodstock. We were first to stumble innocently across the black cables scattered insanely around the makeshift stage, and first to struggle to maintain eye contact across the plywood expanse.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1994 | Steve Hochman
What a difference 25 years makes with the media. The press got caught short by the original Woodstock festival in 1969. Who knew it was going to be a cultural landmark? "None of the other writers wanted to go," recalls Atlantic Records President Danny Goldberg, who was assigned to the rock festival as a 19-year-old cub reporter for Billboard magazine. "I was excited to go, but the regular reviewers were into going to the Copacabana (nightclub) and getting free drinks."
NEWS
August 2, 1994 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
"It used to be us versus them. Then, we became them and the kids became us. Except, we're also still us . . . aren't we?" --Hector Lizzardi, site manager for Woodstock '94. * On a steamy summer morning, Woodstock II is busy being born. With a roar, Hector Lizzardi's Jeep bounces to the top of a grassy ridge and shudders to a halt. Behind the wheel, the ponytailed man with a '60s heart and a '90s bankroll points proudly to the green meadow below.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is hardly a mellow, tie-dyed happening. A quarter of a century after Woodstock, promoters are scrambling to leave little to chance this time on the fringes of this picturesque Hudson Valley village. Construction crews have built two huge tanks on the Winston Farm, each holding 1 million gallons of water. Workers have stretched 25,000 feet of pipes leading to drinking stations. Security personnel have erected more than 10 miles of chain-link fence surrounding the property.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN
You've probably seen that TV commercial set at the "Woodstock '94" reunion, with John Sebastian asking Country Joe McDonald, "Remember when we did this 25 years ago?" A hazy, dazy McDonald squints at the scene and replies, flatly: "No." The truth is, McDonald does remember, and is happy to talk about it. But many other veterans of the landmark pop festival act as if they'd rather not remember the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1994
As the 25th anniversary of "Three Days of Peace and Music" nears, some say that too much has been made of the musical lovefest that took place Aug. 15-17, 1969, near Bethel, N.Y. If it were up to them, the nostalgia would fade away. And that's just the musicians who performed there. Steve Hochman talks to Joan Baez, Carlos Santana and some of the other artists who are willing to remember the cultural milestone.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1994 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI, Chuck Crisafulli is a frequent contributor to Calendar
When David Crosby, Stephen Stills and Graham Nash went on stage at Woodstock in 1969, it was only their second show together. This year the band celebrates a quarter-century of music-making with an album, a tour and, fittingly, a performance at "Woodstock '94," which will be Aug. 13 and 14 in Upstate New York. But if these three '60s survivors are supposed to present themselves as solemn elder statesman of the Woodstock Nation, they aren't playing the part very well.
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