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Woody Allen

ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
Play it again, Woody. Hollywood's Attic Theatre is about to present its second annual Woody Allen one-act play. Last summer, Allen's "God" had a successful run there. Now comes the companion piece, "Death" (1975), opening Friday. "Kleinman is your classic Woody Allen schlemiel character," explained Attic artistic director James Carey. "He's awakened one night by a gang of vigilantes in search of a murdering fiend who's knocking off 6 to 12 people a night.
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NEWS
October 13, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Woody Allen pledged his support Thursday for Democratic mayoral candidate David N. Dinkins and said that Jackie Mason, a fellow comedian, got a "raw deal" when he was banished from the campaign of Republican Rudolph W. Giuliani. Giuliani, who is Dinkins' principal opponent in the November election, jettisoned Mason as a key ambassador to New York's Jewish community last month because of controversial remarks made by Mason.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1987 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
It is Monday night in Michael's Pub in the East 50s and the red velvet rope is up. As he has for 15 years on every Monday night when he can possibly make it, the unsalaried clarinet player is sitting in with the semi-pro combo that includes an ad executive and a New York City detective.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2010 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Toronto — Woody Allen will turn 75 this December, but the prolific clip at which he makes and releases films, roughly one every year for the last 30 years, would daunt many men half his age. "I don't sense it as a maintained pace," Allen said recently in Toronto, where he spent less than one full day to mark the screening of his latest project, "You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger," at the Toronto International Film...
NEWS
March 27, 1987 | BILL STEIGERWALD
Woody Allen has never seen David Letterman. He's never been in a shopping mall. He eats dinner out 360 nights a year and he thinks "Blue Velvet" was the best movie of 1986. Those and many other astonishing facts can be found in two current cover stories on America's favorite media-shy neurotic. In Esquire, media critic Tom Shales gets pretty rough with Allen in his essay/interview.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Mickey Rose was a childhood friend of Woody Allen, sharing his pal's fervent enthusiasms for baseball, jazz and movies and later becoming the young filmmaker's writing partner for his early, madcap comedies "Bananas" and "Take the Money and Run. " Rose, who went on to become a television comedy writer, penning jokes and sketches for Johnny Carson, Sid Caesar and other top comedians and shows of his era, died Sunday at his home in Beverly Hills....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1995 | Dana Parsons
I took in Woody Allen's new movie "Mighty Aphrodite" last weekend. I loved it, and so did the audience, applauding at the end. You know you're among friends at a new Woody film, but in eyeballing the crowd, I couldn't help but notice that no one appeared to be under 40.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Todd Solondz, the young writer-director-star of "Fear, Anxiety and Depression," (Goldwyn Pavilion) wants to be the new Woody Allen so badly, he should walk around with a sandwich board emblazoned, "Generic Woody: All the urban neuroses, One tenth the cost." And, unfortunately, less than one tenth the laughs. Of "Interiors." Solondz, a recent NYU graduate, has a subject ripe for satire: the proto-punk Lower Manhattan scene, not quite-starving artists in a landscape of creeping gentrification.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1992
Some film and video industry insiders have been invited to buy pirated video versions of "Husbands and Wives," the new Woody Allen movie scheduled for theatrical release Sept. 18. They were approached by surreptitious callers, asking $150-$200 per copy. Two reliable sources purchased the $200 version; both said the audio and picture were outstanding. Bill Baker of the Motion Picture Assn.
NEWS
May 12, 1987 | From Reuters
Woody Allen, Ginger Rogers, Sidney Pollack and Milos Forman said today it is sinful and immoral to turn old black and white movies into color without permission. In an appearance before a Senate Judiciary subcommittee, the entertainers appealed to Congress for legislation against a new computer-generated technology that adds color to old films. Among those they said are being drastically altered are the Humphrey Bogart classics "Casablanca" and "The Maltese Falcon."
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