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NEWS
November 9, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"There's always a delicious smell around here," the taxi driver said as he braked at the entrance archway of Lea & Perrins' Victorian red-brick factory in this historic Midlands city. Indeed, the visitor is almost overwhelmed by the aroma: tangy, exotic, spicy, redolent of mysterious climes. It is the smell of Britain's world-famed export: The Original and Genuine Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce.
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FOOD
November 27, 2002 | Cindy Dorn, Times Staff Writer
Dear SOS: You once published the steak soup from the Pam Pam Restaurant in San Francisco, which closed years ago. Could you publish it again? Kyle Anne Falco Newtown, Conn. Dear Kyle: Maybe you're not into leftovers. So here's a different kind of soup, one that is very robust. Serve it to a crowd with some good crusty bread, and you'll have a meal. The last time this recipe ran was in 1993.
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FOOD
November 27, 2002 | Cindy Dorn, Times Staff Writer
Dear SOS: You once published the steak soup from the Pam Pam Restaurant in San Francisco, which closed years ago. Could you publish it again? Kyle Anne Falco Newtown, Conn. Dear Kyle: Maybe you're not into leftovers. So here's a different kind of soup, one that is very robust. Serve it to a crowd with some good crusty bread, and you'll have a meal. The last time this recipe ran was in 1993.
FOOD
December 21, 1995 | CHARLES PERRY
Two of the creepiest-sounding foods of all time were the medieval Near Eastern condiments murri and ka^makh. They started as raw barley dough, wrapped in fig leaves and stored in a box for 40 days. When the dough had thoroughly rotted (turned white with "red veins" running through it), it was ground up and rotted some more.
FOOD
August 13, 1987 | JANE SALZFASS FREIMAN, Freiman is a New York-based food writer
I call this Bloody Mary Soup because it is a relatively spicy mixture, and a tablespoon of vodka, stirred in at the last moment, punches up the flavor. An avocado, pureed with lemon and sour cream to a smooth, creamy texture, adds a final fillip of richness to the cold soup and counterbalances the spicing. Actually, the soup is like a cross between gazpacho and a partially cooked tomato soup, since cooking is limited to parboiling the tomatoes so they can be peeled and pureed.
FOOD
December 21, 1995 | CHARLES PERRY
Two of the creepiest-sounding foods of all time were the medieval Near Eastern condiments murri and ka^makh. They started as raw barley dough, wrapped in fig leaves and stored in a box for 40 days. When the dough had thoroughly rotted (turned white with "red veins" running through it), it was ground up and rotted some more.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | BEVERLY BUSH SMITH, Beverly Bush Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers restaurant news for The Times Orange County Edition. and
Amateur chefs from Orange County took the second and third prizes Friday in the Tony Roma consumer recipe contest for "The Best Homemade Barbecue Sauce in Southern California." Competing at Tony Roma's in Universal City with eight other amateur chefs, William K. Smith of Westminster came in second and will receive a weekend for two in San Francisco.
FOOD
August 22, 1991 | STEVEN RAICHLEN, Raichlen is a Miami-based food writer and author
I never actually saw a fresh tamarind pod until I went to Thailand. But during 20 years of gastronomic peregrinations, this tart fruit had crossed my path dozens of times. I have sipped tamarindo sodas at sidewalk cafes in Sicily. I have spooned tamarind chutney over samosas (potato turnovers) in Boston's Little Bombay. I have munched on tamarind candies from the Philippines at the Fruit & Spice Park in South Florida.
FOOD
June 27, 1991 | DALE CURRY, Curry is the food editor of the New Orleans Times-Picayune
Paul Prudhomme is happy. "I'm mobile. I work 18 hours a day. I wake up every morning feeling wonderful," he says. But about two years ago, at 485 pounds, he was not so happy. "I got to an uncomfortable weight and I had to do something," he says. First, he tried powdered diet products and even got creative with them, inventing new recipes. "I got sick of it and decided it was time to get serious," he says. "With my ability to cook, I changed to food."
FOOD
April 27, 1989 | ROSE DOSTI, Times Staff Writer
There is a choice group of dishes from restaurants that have left an indelible mark on the Los Angeles culinary scene. They are dishes you would drop a date with a best friend to taste. They are dishes with an illustrious past and bright future. They possess a bold character and unmistakable charm--along, of course, with exceptional flavor. They have survived the test of time. They are, in fact, a class unto themselves, defying description. Each dish stands on its own, as proud of having originated in a diner as in a chi-chi bistro.
NEWS
November 9, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"There's always a delicious smell around here," the taxi driver said as he braked at the entrance archway of Lea & Perrins' Victorian red-brick factory in this historic Midlands city. Indeed, the visitor is almost overwhelmed by the aroma: tangy, exotic, spicy, redolent of mysterious climes. It is the smell of Britain's world-famed export: The Original and Genuine Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce.
FOOD
August 22, 1991 | STEVEN RAICHLEN, Raichlen is a Miami-based food writer and author
I never actually saw a fresh tamarind pod until I went to Thailand. But during 20 years of gastronomic peregrinations, this tart fruit had crossed my path dozens of times. I have sipped tamarindo sodas at sidewalk cafes in Sicily. I have spooned tamarind chutney over samosas (potato turnovers) in Boston's Little Bombay. I have munched on tamarind candies from the Philippines at the Fruit & Spice Park in South Florida.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | BEVERLY BUSH SMITH, Beverly Bush Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers restaurant news for The Times Orange County Edition. and
Amateur chefs from Orange County took the second and third prizes Friday in the Tony Roma consumer recipe contest for "The Best Homemade Barbecue Sauce in Southern California." Competing at Tony Roma's in Universal City with eight other amateur chefs, William K. Smith of Westminster came in second and will receive a weekend for two in San Francisco.
FOOD
August 13, 1987 | JANE SALZFASS FREIMAN, Freiman is a New York-based food writer
I call this Bloody Mary Soup because it is a relatively spicy mixture, and a tablespoon of vodka, stirred in at the last moment, punches up the flavor. An avocado, pureed with lemon and sour cream to a smooth, creamy texture, adds a final fillip of richness to the cold soup and counterbalances the spicing. Actually, the soup is like a cross between gazpacho and a partially cooked tomato soup, since cooking is limited to parboiling the tomatoes so they can be peeled and pureed.
FOOD
November 24, 2011
Beer and caraway mustard Total time: 15 minutes, plus overnight soaking time for the mustard Servings: Makes about 1 2/3 cups mustard Note: To toast caraway seeds, place them in a small skillet. Heat the skillet over medium heat, just until the seeds become aromatic, 1 to 2 minutes, shaking the pan occasionally to keep the seeds from burning. About ¼ cup plus 3 tablespoons (2½ ounces) brown mustard seeds About ¾ cup (2½ ounces) mustard powder 1 tablespoon toasted and crushed caraway seeds 1/2 cup water 3/4 cup flat beer, preferably stout or a dark ale 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt 2 1/2 tablespoons dark brown sugar 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1. Soak the mustard seeds: Place the mustard seeds, powder and crushed caraway seeds in a medium glass or ceramic bowl along with the water and beer.
FOOD
August 16, 2000 | ABBY MANDEL
No matter what people say, nothing's easier than cooking fish. It takes less than 10 minutes to pan-sear a fish and finish it off in the oven. Slow roasting is easy, too, and requires very little of your attention. These recipes are for salmon and halibut steaks about 3/4 inch thick. If you use other cuts, adjust the cooking time according to thickness. Fish is done when the flesh feels firm to the touch.
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