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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2011 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
Over a recent breakfast at the Peninsula Hotel, Gloria Steinem is awash in pale, neutral colors. She wears a flowy white blouse, no makeup but for sheer, nude lipstick and soft, blond highlights still frame her face, as do her trademark aviator sunglasses. The neutral canvas catapults one accessory front and center: Steinem's words, which are unwavering and polished as ever. "I'm old, but the movement is young," says Steinem, 77. "Every social justice movement has to last at least 100 years or it doesn't really get absorbed into society.
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OPINION
July 17, 2009
'I would hope that a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn't lived that life." Those words, delivered by Judge Sonia Sotomayor in a 2001 speech, have come up repeatedly as the Senate Judiciary Committee considers Sotomayor's nomination to the Supreme Court. It made us wonder: How were the questions playing with other "wise Latinas"?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2009 | By Steve Appleford
George Carlin was stand-up comedy's transformational man. He went through it time and again through the decades, first as a young hipster hungry to fit into the showbiz life, then slowly finding his voice and a roomful of laughs as a counter-culture hero and finally abandoning it all once more for something sharper and even more authentically his own. Carlin realized he was less an entertainer than an artist -- a true master of "the vulgar art"...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2009
SPORTS
May 11, 2002
As a transplanted Chicagoan happily living in Southern California, I used to think the greatest words in sports were Harry Caray yelling, "Cubs win! Cubs win!" Now I think the greatest words in sports are "T.J. Simers is on vacation." Robert Kaseman San Diego
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2011 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In a bit of unintentional synchronicity, the HBO documentary on feminist icon Gloria Steinem "Gloria: In Her Own Words" airs mere weeks before NBC trots out period soap "The Playboy Club. " Steinem's first foray into controversial journalism and, one could argue, feminism was an assignment from Show magazine to go "undercover" as a Playboy bunny. And though the NBC series clearly did not use Steinem's story, which focused on the arduous physical and emotional working conditions of the bunnies, as background, it did enable Steinem to make headlines; while doing publicity for the documentary, she called for viewers to boycott "The Playboy Club.
WORLD
April 20, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
"There are 400,000 words in the English language, and there are seven of them that you can't say on television…. They must be really bad." In 1972, comedian George Carlin wrote a monologue titled, "Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television." When a version of this riff was broadcast the following year on a jazz radio station, it set off a legal battle that went all the way to the Supreme Court, which ultimately upheld the right of the Federal Communications Commission to regulate indecent material on the airwaves.
OPINION
June 24, 2005
Is "the insurgency is on its last legs" 2005 speak for "there is light at the end of the tunnel"? W.L. Sibley Northridge
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