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November 28, 2009 | By Steve Appleford
George Carlin was stand-up comedy's transformational man. He went through it time and again through the decades, first as a young hipster hungry to fit into the showbiz life, then slowly finding his voice and a roomful of laughs as a counter-culture hero and finally abandoning it all once more for something sharper and even more authentically his own. Carlin realized he was less an entertainer than an artist -- a true master of "the vulgar art"...
August 13, 2011 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
Over a recent breakfast at the Peninsula Hotel, Gloria Steinem is awash in pale, neutral colors. She wears a flowy white blouse, no makeup but for sheer, nude lipstick and soft, blond highlights still frame her face, as do her trademark aviator sunglasses. The neutral canvas catapults one accessory front and center: Steinem's words, which are unwavering and polished as ever. "I'm old, but the movement is young," says Steinem, 77. "Every social justice movement has to last at least 100 years or it doesn't really get absorbed into society.
April 12, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Baboons don't read, don't speak and perhaps can't understand language at all. But scientists have found that they can learn to recognize writing on a computer screen, identifying correctly most of the time which combinations of letters are words ("done," "vast") and which are not ("telk," "virt"). The discovery may help explain how reading evolved in humans, researchers said, bolstering a theory that the skill first arose from animals' ability to distinguish objects, rather than from the uniquely human demands of verbal communication.
May 11, 2002
As a transplanted Chicagoan happily living in Southern California, I used to think the greatest words in sports were Harry Caray yelling, "Cubs win! Cubs win!" Now I think the greatest words in sports are "T.J. Simers is on vacation." Robert Kaseman San Diego
November 1, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Maplewood, N.J., was one of the communities hit by Hurricane Sandy. Located about six miles west of Newark, Maplewood saw massive trees fall and lost much of its electricity. Downed power lines forced the community to cancel its Halloween parade. However, parts of its downtown did not lose power; that's where [words] bookstore is located. Co-owner Jonah Zimiles emailed to let us know the store is powered up and open. He wrote that the lights are on, neighbors are stopping by to charge up their phones, and readers are browsing.
June 24, 2005
Is "the insurgency is on its last legs" 2005 speak for "there is light at the end of the tunnel"? W.L. Sibley Northridge
January 19, 1992
If Groothuis wants to learn some new words, how about flatulent verbosity ? CARLO PANNO, BURBANK
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