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July 17, 2009
August 13, 2011 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
Over a recent breakfast at the Peninsula Hotel, Gloria Steinem is awash in pale, neutral colors. She wears a flowy white blouse, no makeup but for sheer, nude lipstick and soft, blond highlights still frame her face, as do her trademark aviator sunglasses. The neutral canvas catapults one accessory front and center: Steinem's words, which are unwavering and polished as ever. "I'm old, but the movement is young," says Steinem, 77. "Every social justice movement has to last at least 100 years or it doesn't really get absorbed into society.
January 29, 2013 | By Deirdre Edgar
An article in Friday's Times featuring centenarian and frequent letter writer Carleton Ralston caught the eye of reader Trent Sanders of La Canada Flintridge. Sanders is himself, to borrow reporter Gale Holland's phrase, a man of letters. Not only is he a regular correspondent to the Readers' Rep office, but he's had 54 letters to the editor published in The Times since 1985. "My compliments to Mr. Ralston," Sanders emailed. "Letters to the editor are one of the few ways an individual can influence public debate.
May 11, 2002
As a transplanted Chicagoan happily living in Southern California, I used to think the greatest words in sports were Harry Caray yelling, "Cubs win! Cubs win!" Now I think the greatest words in sports are "T.J. Simers is on vacation." Robert Kaseman San Diego
January 19, 1992
If Groothuis wants to learn some new words, how about flatulent verbosity ? CARLO PANNO, BURBANK
April 1, 1985
In your editorial (March 20) about the Soviet scientist Iosef Shklovskii you neglected to mention the "play on words" in his statement of why he was unable to leave the Soviet Union: "Yes, I was ill. I had diabetes. Too much Sakharov." Sakhar is the Russian word for sugar. MICHAEL J. BAZYLER Los Angeles
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