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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2009 | By Steve Appleford
George Carlin was stand-up comedy's transformational man. He went through it time and again through the decades, first as a young hipster hungry to fit into the showbiz life, then slowly finding his voice and a roomful of laughs as a counter-culture hero and finally abandoning it all once more for something sharper and even more authentically his own. Carlin realized he was less an entertainer than an artist -- a true master of "the vulgar art"...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2013 | By Deirdre Edgar
An article in Friday's Times featuring centenarian and frequent letter writer Carleton Ralston caught the eye of reader Trent Sanders of La Canada Flintridge. Sanders is himself, to borrow reporter Gale Holland's phrase, a man of letters. Not only is he a regular correspondent to the Readers' Rep office, but he's had 54 letters to the editor published in The Times since 1985. "My compliments to Mr. Ralston," Sanders emailed. "Letters to the editor are one of the few ways an individual can influence public debate.
SPORTS
May 11, 2002
As a transplanted Chicagoan happily living in Southern California, I used to think the greatest words in sports were Harry Caray yelling, "Cubs win! Cubs win!" Now I think the greatest words in sports are "T.J. Simers is on vacation." Robert Kaseman San Diego
BOOKS
January 19, 1992
If Groothuis wants to learn some new words, how about flatulent verbosity ? CARLO PANNO, BURBANK
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1985
In your editorial (March 20) about the Soviet scientist Iosef Shklovskii you neglected to mention the "play on words" in his statement of why he was unable to leave the Soviet Union: "Yes, I was ill. I had diabetes. Too much Sakharov." Sakhar is the Russian word for sugar. MICHAEL J. BAZYLER Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1989
It's unfortunate that the members of Guns N' Roses lack the maturity to deliver their message without having to make every fourth word a foul one. At the recent Coliseum concert, the guitar player served up some incredibly trite lead, but not before proving that, yes indeed, he was a member of GNR: He too has a marvelously varied vocabulary, which also contains only four-letter words--duhh. What a gem. What a sterling example for the kids who came to hear good music. What a jerk.
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