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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2007 | Duke Helfand and Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke publicly for the first time Monday about the breakup of his 20-year marriage, saying he was responsible for the split even as he refused to talk about what caused it. In a somber meeting with reporters at City Hall, Villaraigosa declined to answer questions about whether the break with his wife, Corina, was triggered by another romantic relationship.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 12, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Russian President Vladimir Putin has massed tens of thousands of troops along Ukraine's eastern border, a reminder of his vow to protect ethnic Russians in the neighboring country. Using his army, however, is probably Plan B. Rather than repeating the "Crimean scenario" - invading, seizing and annexing territory - the Kremlin would prefer to keep Ukraine weak and divided by forcing a change in how it is governed, analysts say. Increasing regional autonomy at the expense of the central government would force Ukrainian authorities to constantly balance competing visions of the country to hold it together, and in effect give Moscow veto power through its influence among ethnic Russians in the east.
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OPINION
April 7, 2013 | By Susan Silk and Barry Goldman
When Susan had breast cancer, we heard a lot of lame remarks, but our favorite came from one of Susan's colleagues. She wanted, she needed, to visit Susan after the surgery, but Susan didn't feel like having visitors, and she said so. Her colleague's response? "This isn't just about you. " "It's not?" Susan wondered. "My breast cancer is not about me? It's about you?" The same theme came up again when our friend Katie had a brain aneurysm. She was in intensive care for a long time and finally got out and into a step-down unit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Gregory White Smith, a Harvard-trained lawyer, businessman, philanthropist and Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer who raised hackles in the art world with an intensely psychological examination of the life and work of Jackson Pollock, has died. He was 62. Smith died Thursday at his home in Aiken, S.C., of a rare brain tumor diagnosed nearly 40 years ago, said his spouse and co-author Steven Naifeh. Naifeh and Smith won the Pulitzer Prize in biography for "Jackson Pollock: An American Saga," which was published in 1990 and spurred the 2000 movie "Pollock" starring Ed Harris.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Just in case you were beginning to think rich people were deeply misunderstood and that they feel the pain of those who are less fortunate, here's the world's wealthiest woman, Australian mining tycoon Gina Rinehart, with some helpful advice. "If you're jealous of those with more money, don't just sit there and complain," she said in a magazine piece . "Do something to make more money yourself -- spend less time drinking or smoking and socialising, and more time working. " Yeah, let them eat cake.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2012 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Richard A. Serrano and Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
John "Sly" Sylvester, a radio commentator and Democratic operative in Madison, Wis., was dining at a Mexican restaurant in Washington with then-Wisconsin Sen. Russ Feingold about 20 years ago when a young Paul Ryan walked up. "He was our waiter," Sylvester said. Feingold knew Ryan's late father and, as they chatted, Ryan "said he even used to listen to my show when he was a kid," Sylvester recalled. Examples like that have helped Ryan, soon-to-be the GOP's vice presidential nominee, burnish his credentials as a youthful working-class guy. "I don't know about you, but when I was growing up, when I was flipping burgers at McDonald's, when I was standing in front of that big Hobart machine washing dishes, or waiting tables, I never thought of myself as stuck in some station in life," Ryan recently told a crowd at a high school in suburban Denver.
SCIENCE
November 21, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
In 2005, a woman showed up at Emory University's sleep center in Atlanta complaining of being sleepy just about every moment of every day. She slept for 14, then 16, then 18 hours a night, but still woke up feeling drowsy. Doctors had prescribed her stimulants, which worked for a bit. But when they wore off, she would go on a sleeping binge, becoming unarousable for days at a time. Her diagnosis? Hypersomnia, a rare and debilitating condition in which people sleep excessively, are extremely drowsy while awake, and respond poorly to existing anti-sleep treatments.
NEWS
July 15, 2010 | Nicholas, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Movie celebrity goes to jail lat ..
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2010
Making Our Democracy Work A Judge's View Stephen Breyer Knopf, 270 pp, $26.95
OPINION
March 27, 2013
Re "The bias against working women," Opinion, March 22 I have had many conversations over the years with women who were considering job changes. I have never heard anyone mention the increased tax rate on two-income households, a factor that Aspen Gorry and Sita Nataraj Slavov say discriminates against working women. Much more important are things like healthcare benefits, the cost of child care, the length of the commute, salary, whether they will find the work challenging and the wish to advance their careers.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are like the Coke and Pepsi of U.S. maritime transportation. They seem similar, they dominate the competition but they have a long history of less-than-friendly rivalry. Now, an independent commission's proposal to merge the neighboring harbors is being met with skepticism. The L.A. 2020 Commission, made up of prominent business, labor and civic leaders, on Wednesday unveiled a series of recommendations that included merging the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.
HEALTH
April 11, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
I've been a runner for more than 30 years, but I'm something of a serial monogamist when it comes to fitness classes. (At the moment, I'm hooked on Ken Tietjen's classes at my neighborhood Pilates studio, Whole Body Fitness.) But I know what it's like to be on the prowl for a new class. So we're going to do some of the work for you. Each week, we'll try a new class and let you know what it's like. And, please, let me know if you have suggestions by email or on Twitter ( @mmacvean )
HOME & GARDEN
April 11, 2014 | By Lisa Boone
Architect Stiles O. Clements had a knack for designing lavish buildings - the Spanish Colonial Revival El Capitan Theater, the Adamson House and the Art Deco Wiltern Theatre among them. Beginning Sunday, architecture buffs can go inside one of Clements' more low-key residential designs as the Pasadena Showcase House for the Arts stages its latest design house in Pasadena. As always, design trends are on display. Twenty-five designers have transformed the 1915 English Arts and Crafts estate while retaining the home's warm spirit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By David Colker
Lucia Eames was a designer in her own right, but for the last 25 years she worked to preserve the legacy of one of the most celebrated design teams of the modern era: her father, Charles Eames, and stepmother, Ray Eames. In particular, Lucia Eames ensured that their famed Pacific Palisades house - considered one of the pinnacles of modern residential design - remained as a monument not only to the couple's sense of architecture and design, but also to the way they approached their work.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - An inspectors general report released Thursday faulted the FBI for failing to conduct a "more thorough assessment" of suspected Boston Marathon bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev, saying such an investigation might have turned up evidence about his growing embrace of Islamic militancy and his possible threat to the United States. But the report's unclassified summary stopped short of saying a closer examination of Tsarnaev would necessarily have prevented the April 15, 2013, attack, which killed three people and injured more than 260. Acting on a 2011 tip from Russian intelligence, the FBI investigated Tsarnaev before last year's bombing, but closed the inquiry after the bureau found no links to terrorism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By David Zahniser
The panel charged with looking into sexual harassment claims against Los Angeles City Councilman Jose Huizar has completed its work and forwarded its findings to Council President Herb Wesson. News that the probe is finished comes as the City Council on Friday is scheduled to consider a contract authorizing up to $200,000 in payments to the law firm representing Huizar in a lawsuit filed by his accuser, former Deputy Chief of Staff Francine Godoy. The report, which council members are expected to consider behind closed doors, was prepared by Batza & Associates, an investigative firm that specializes in workplace matters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
TBS, whose slogan is "Very Funny," has built its house out of sitcoms - most of them reruns (currently including "Seinfeld," "The Office," "Friends," "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" and "The Big Bang Theory"), but with an increasing emphasis on the new. (It's also acquired "Cougar Town" from ABC.) It's like TV Land for viewers whose sense of nostalgia is rooted in the '80s, '90s and early '00s: a demographic that includes the characters in its new original series, "Men at Work. " "Men at Work," which premieres Thursday, was created by Breckin Meyer, who as an actor stars in TNT's legal buddy dramedy "Franklin & Bash," and as a writer was Emmy-nominated for Adult Swim's sparky, ironic animated-action-figure sketch comedy, "Robot Chicken.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2010
Well-known for her pop art paintings of beguiling young women in fanciful backdrops, Japanese pop artist Yumiko Kayukawa will be signing her work at the opening of her new show, "49 Days. " Kayukawa's show runs through Sept. 23 in conjunction with surrealist painter and Otis professor Nathan Ota's new exhibition "An Unforeseen Homecoming. " La Luz De Jesus Gallery, 4633 Hollywood Blvd. Artist reception, 8-11 p.m. Fri. Free. http://www.laluzdejesus.com .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
It's rather refreshing that the next California Assembly Speaker spent her early years in a house with no indoor plumbing. Her family carried in water from a spring for drinking, cooking and washing. For a bathroom, they trekked to an outhouse. Assemblywoman Toni Atkins' father was a coal and lead miner; her mother a seamstress. The parents and their four kids crammed themselves into a little four-room house in rural southern Virginia. So when the Democrat, a San Diego transplant, talks about poor people and their housing needs, she isn't just whistling Dixie.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
The "Heartbleed" software flaw that triggered alarm bells around the world could fundamentally undermine two decades' worth of efforts to persuade consumers they could trust the Web to securely handle such tasks as buying a pair of shoes and applying for a job. The discovery of a gaping hole in a piece of software that was supposed to protect personal information from hackers left websites rushing to fix the bug while consumers struggled to understand...
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