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SPORTS
November 28, 2013 | By David Wharton
Russian President Vladimir Putin paid a visit to Sochi on Thursday and proclaimed that organizers are ready to host the 2014 Winter Olympics. Pretty much. "Almost everything has been done," Putin told the Ria Novosti news service. "But when I say 'almost' I mean some things still need to be polished.” Among the facilities requiring more attention is the 40,000-seat Fisht Olympic Stadium, which will be the site for the opening and closing ceremonies. "Some of the equipment should be installed and additional preparation work should be finished,” Putin said.
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NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
After enjoying a streak of good news on the jobs front, President Obama's reaction to the disappointing March job report was measured and quick. Obama made only a passing reference to the report on Friday, as he addressed a White House forum on women and the workforce. The president seized on bright spots - a slightly lower unemployment rate and the 120,000 new jobs -- and then qualified his optimism. “But it's clear to every American that there will still be ups and downs along the way and that we've got a lot more work to do,” Obama said.
SPORTS
November 26, 2012
If you missed Monday's Google+ Hangout, "NFL Slam with Mark and Sam", you missed a good one. Mark Thompson and Sam Farmer tackle a host of topics, one of the more intriguing ones being whether Oregon Coach Chip Kelly's up-tempo offense can work in the NFL. Farmer told Thompson that he has his doubts. With the following questions to be answere: How do you protect the quarterback? The quarterback is much more exposed in Kelly's type of system, particularly when he's carrying the ball.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
"Material Reflex," a tight introduction to Sonya Clark's work at the Craft & Folk Art Museum, centers on the evocative and provocative power of hair. This isn't new territory. Others have taken on hair as an integral marker of African American identity, especially: Think of Lorna Simpson's attention to hairstyle and wigs; Kori Newkirk's use of beads, synthetic hair and pomade; Alison Saar's casting of hair as roots, branches, vessels, connective currents. Clark, whose heritage is African American, Caribbean and Scottish, shows quite poignantly that even if familiar, the territory is not exhausted.
SPORTS
February 18, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
The Golden State Warriors released a statement from former Lakers All-Star and general manager Jerry West regarding Jerry Buss, who died on Monday. “This is an extremely sad day for me," said West.  "As I have said many times, I have been blessed to work for Jerry Buss, the most successful owner in basketball history. His incredible commitment and desire to build a championship-caliber team that could sustain success over a long period of time has been unmatched. "With all of his achievements, Jerry was without a doubt one of the most humble men I've ever been around.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Watching"Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry"is like experiencing a thrilling unfinished symphony: The story is enthralling, but it's not over, and there's no telling where it's going. Which makes what we see on screen all the more involving. Though he was named the most powerful artist in the world by ArtReview, Chinese provocateur/human rights activist Ai is simply a boldface name to most people, someone whose life and significance we are only vaguely aware of. Alison Klayman's documentary, a Sundance award winner, definitively changes that.
OPINION
October 21, 2012 | By Ariela R. Dubler
With his eye on the much-coveted female voter, Mitt Romney proudly brandished his pro-woman credentials in Tuesday night's presidential debate, recounting his vigorous efforts to hire women as members of his Cabinet when he was governor of Massachusetts. How did he do it? Two strategies: First, a little old-fashioned affirmative action (that is, faced with too few female applicants and a desire for women in the workplace, he put together binders of female candidates and considered them separately)
WORLD
April 9, 2009
SPORTS
March 1, 2010 | By Phil Rogers
It was 2:30 on a weekend afternoon, and Mark McGwire was still in the hitting cage, in uniform, working with St. Louis Cardinals hitters. He had been there since shortly after 7 a.m. after arriving at the Roger Dean Stadium complex an hour earlier, as usual reporting to duty with his extra security detail. As McGwire picked up a bat to make a point to a non-roster hitter, in the Florida Marlins' identical cage at the shared facility, less than 100 yards away, players' children, some barely old enough to walk, ran around and wrestled with each other in the hitting area.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012 | By Holly Myers
Mark Dutcher's work is nothing if not lived in. Made with humble materials and straightforward techniques, his paintings and sculptures are messy, fervent and unpretentious. They're covered in fingerprints and other blemishes; any mistakes that he's made are left pointedly intact. They're works that never let you forget they were made by another human being, which is just as Dutcher intends it. "Even if I had lots of money and could fabricate something perfectly," he says, "I don't think I would be obsessed with perfection.
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