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NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots Blog
The study and its findings might seem like the opening of a new front on the perennial skirmishes of the "Mommy Wars": continuous work outside the home after the birth of a first child makes a mother healthier at age 40 than the mom who stayed home to care for her baby, and healthier even than the one who pared her hours back to part-time. But the latest study, presented in Denver on Monday at the American Sociological Assn. 's annual conference, finds that what seem to be our "choices" after the birth of children may be less a matter of choice than an extension of our lives up to that point.
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NEWS
May 27, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
SEATTLE -- Torii Hunter, on baseball's restricted list since May 14, is scheduled to return to Southern California and work out at Angel Stadium today, Angels Manager Mike Scioscia said. The Angels right fielder will go through another workout Monday afternoon, and there is a good chance he will be activated for Monday night's game against the New York Yankees at Angel Stadium. Hunter has been in Texas the last two weeks dealing with the arrest of his 17-year-old son, Darius McClinton-Hunter, on suspicion of sexual assault.
SPORTS
November 28, 2013 | By David Wharton
Russian President Vladimir Putin paid a visit to Sochi on Thursday and proclaimed that organizers are ready to host the 2014 Winter Olympics. Pretty much. "Almost everything has been done," Putin told the Ria Novosti news service. "But when I say 'almost' I mean some things still need to be polished.” Among the facilities requiring more attention is the 40,000-seat Fisht Olympic Stadium, which will be the site for the opening and closing ceremonies. "Some of the equipment should be installed and additional preparation work should be finished,” Putin said.
NEWS
February 23, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
People suffering from depression usually can find an antidepressant that works for them -- even if they have to try more than one. But how long will the drug continue to work? Here's an online discussion about the long-term effects and other aspects of these drugs. A panel at a live Web chat Thursday (noon EST, 11 a.m. CST, 9 a.m. PST) is to include Dr. John Goethe, director of the IOL Research and Depression Initiative at Hartford Hospital; Dr. Surita Rao, department head for behavioral health at St. Francis Hospital; and Andrew Winokur, director of the Neuropsychopharmacology Treatment, Research and Training Center at the University of Connecticut.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
After enjoying a streak of good news on the jobs front, President Obama's reaction to the disappointing March job report was measured and quick. Obama made only a passing reference to the report on Friday, as he addressed a White House forum on women and the workforce. The president seized on bright spots - a slightly lower unemployment rate and the 120,000 new jobs -- and then qualified his optimism. “But it's clear to every American that there will still be ups and downs along the way and that we've got a lot more work to do,” Obama said.
SPORTS
November 26, 2012
If you missed Monday's Google+ Hangout, "NFL Slam with Mark and Sam", you missed a good one. Mark Thompson and Sam Farmer tackle a host of topics, one of the more intriguing ones being whether Oregon Coach Chip Kelly's up-tempo offense can work in the NFL. Farmer told Thompson that he has his doubts. With the following questions to be answere: How do you protect the quarterback? The quarterback is much more exposed in Kelly's type of system, particularly when he's carrying the ball.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
"Material Reflex," a tight introduction to Sonya Clark's work at the Craft & Folk Art Museum, centers on the evocative and provocative power of hair. This isn't new territory. Others have taken on hair as an integral marker of African American identity, especially: Think of Lorna Simpson's attention to hairstyle and wigs; Kori Newkirk's use of beads, synthetic hair and pomade; Alison Saar's casting of hair as roots, branches, vessels, connective currents. Clark, whose heritage is African American, Caribbean and Scottish, shows quite poignantly that even if familiar, the territory is not exhausted.
SPORTS
August 8, 2012 | By Chuck Schilken
Andy Reid returned to work Wednesday, the day after the funeral of his 29-year-old son, Garrett. The Philadelphia Eagles coach told reporters it was "the right thing to do. " "My son wouldn't want it any other way," Reid said. "He loved the Philadelphia Eagles.” Garrett Reid, who had battled drug addiction and had served time in prison and halfway houses, was found dead Sunday morning in his dorm room at Lehigh University where he was serving as an assistant to the Eagles' strength and conditioning coach at training camp.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Back in June, two weeks after a nuclear submarine went up in flames at a Maine shipyard and caused $400 million in damage, Navy officials thought the blaze might have been caused by a vacuum cleaner that had sucked up something hot.  Nope. According to charges filed Monday in federal court, the fire was started by a stressed, anxious, depressed, heavily medicated painter who had a panic attack and wanted to get out of work. The May 23 blaze injured seven people who were trying to put it out.   The fire was “the most significant event ever experienced at the shipyard," said acting shipyard commander Cmdr.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Watching"Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry"is like experiencing a thrilling unfinished symphony: The story is enthralling, but it's not over, and there's no telling where it's going. Which makes what we see on screen all the more involving. Though he was named the most powerful artist in the world by ArtReview, Chinese provocateur/human rights activist Ai is simply a boldface name to most people, someone whose life and significance we are only vaguely aware of. Alison Klayman's documentary, a Sundance award winner, definitively changes that.
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