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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Anne LeBaron is a composer as transformer. She transforms instruments, such as putting objects on the strings of the harp to tease out hidden sounds. She transforms cultural contexts, be they Kazakh, Bach or Katrina. She deals with what we know, with issues of our time and place. But her knack is for alternative realities, showing us the here and now from a point just slightly off the beaten track. That, of course, makes it difficult to generalize about a two-part portrait of LeBaron in two concerts Saturday and Sunday at REDCAT.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
For nearly two decades, Barbara Garnaus maintained a modest, delicate life balance: keeping her part-time Orange County school district job and juggling her bills and credit card debt. Now 63, living alone, she counts every dollar, has no cellphone and commutes an hour in traffic so she can keep an affordable apartment in Laguna Woods. Having good health helped. Garnaus got by without medical insurance, relying on yearly exams at a free clinic. But that changed last year: Garnaus now needs treatment for cancer, and she bought insurance under Obamacare.
TRAVEL
April 13, 2014
Vincent Bevins wrote that, "São Paulo was built by immigrants from Italy, Japan, Portugal and Lebanon, among others... " ["Culture by Day, Partying by Night," March 30]. That is quite an interesting tidbit about the place that received the majority of the slaves shipped to the Americas. I suppose they are the "among others. " John Anderson Chicago Airlines horror story We recently returned from Amman, Jordan, using Air France business class to Paris, and experienced a new level of disservice.
WORLD
April 12, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Russian President Vladimir Putin has massed tens of thousands of troops along Ukraine's eastern border, a reminder of his vow to protect ethnic Russians in the neighboring country. Using his army, however, is probably Plan B. Rather than repeating the "Crimean scenario" - invading, seizing and annexing territory - the Kremlin would prefer to keep Ukraine weak and divided by forcing a change in how it is governed, analysts say. Increasing regional autonomy at the expense of the central government would force Ukrainian authorities to constantly balance competing visions of the country to hold it together, and in effect give Moscow veto power through its influence among ethnic Russians in the east.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Chris Lee
Randall Wallace didn't expect a rock-star reception when he went on the road to promote his faith-based drama "Heaven Is for Real" ahead of its Easter-weekend release. Yet at the First Assembly of God Church in Phoenix, 9,000 congregants greeted the filmmaker with a standing ovation. A few days later, 11,000 boisterous students packed a convocation in the sports arena at Liberty University, a Christian college in Lynchburg, Va., where Wallace, best known for writing the 1995 battle biopic "Braveheart" and directing the equestrian drama "Secretariat," spoke about "Heaven Is for Real.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Even after nine decades as an actor, Norman Lloyd loves to perform - even if it's for an audience of one. During a recent interview, Lloyd was brandishing the cleaver used in "Man From the South," the landmark 1960 episode of "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" starring Steve McQueen and Peter Lorre that Lloyd directed. The ironically macabre tale revolves around a young gambler who makes a gruesome bet with an elderly man to win the man's convertible. If the gambler's lighter lights 10 times straight he will win the car, but if it doesn't the man will cut the gambler's pinkie finger off with a cleaver.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Amy Kaufman
"How you doin', baby?" Marlon Wayans said, leaning down to kiss a doll on the lips. The toy, a prop from Wayans' latest movie, "A Haunted House 2," was propped up in a chair across the table from the actor at a stuffy Beverly Hills restaurant. The doll, named Abigail, was meant to resemble a creepy figurine from 2013's "The Conjuring": Both shared the same dead green eyes, sooty peasant dress and pigtail braids. Wayans, 41, has long been known for his outrageous comic taste. He dressed as a Caucasian female FBI agent in "White Chicks" and has been poking fun at the horror genre for years, launching the hit "Scary Movie" parody franchise in 2000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Gregory White Smith, a Harvard-trained lawyer, businessman, philanthropist and Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer who raised hackles in the art world with an intensely psychological examination of the life and work of Jackson Pollock, has died. He was 62. Smith died Thursday at his home in Aiken, S.C., of a rare brain tumor diagnosed nearly 40 years ago, said his spouse and co-author Steven Naifeh. Naifeh and Smith won the Pulitzer Prize in biography for "Jackson Pollock: An American Saga," which was published in 1990 and spurred the 2000 movie "Pollock" starring Ed Harris.
SPORTS
April 12, 2014 | By Chris Foster
UCLA defensive end Owamagbe Odighizuwa had some time on his hands last fall. So defensive line coach Angus McClure put him to work. Odighizuwa sat out the 2013 season after having two hip surgeries. McClure gave the 6-foot 3, 270-pounder other responsibilities to keep him engaged while he rehabilitated. “I made it a point to have him work with our younger players,” McClure said. “It was easy for him to do. He is an intrinsically motivated person.” Kyle Fitts, a freshman defensive end last fall, said that Odighizuwa was an effective teacher.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014
An in-demand bassist who studied under Charlie Haden and has performed with a rich roster of talents that includes Ani DiFranco, Andrew Bird, Nels Cline and Scott Amendola, Todd Sickafoose's knotted and lovely 2008 album, "Tiny Resistors," was one of the top jazz releases of that year. Finally at the cusp of delivering an encore, Sickafoose reunites an all-star band that includes violinist Jenny Scheinman, clarinetist Ben Goldberg and drummer Allison Miller to premiere a piece dubbed "Bear Proof," a work commissioned by Chamber Music America.
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