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SPORTS
March 16, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
It was one of the Lakers' few sunshine moments this season, a historically bizarre victory in Cleveland when backup center Robert Sacre was allowed to keep playing despite picking up a sixth foul. The serenity, though, was short-lived. As Lakers Coach Mike D'Antoni walked to the team bus in the underbelly of Quicken Loans Arena, he was heckled by fans cordoned behind a rope. "Where's Phil Jackson?" one of them yelled in a surprisingly loud outburst. "Your team is awful!"
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BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Hannah Kuchler
Like bacteria, big data are lurking in the stomachs of cows. Some farmers are using sensors and software to analyze it and predict when a cow is getting ill. Just like customers, cows do not always speak out when something is wrong. But companies can use data to predict potential risks and opportunities in cows and customers alike. The message of a new book, "Big Data @Work," by Thomas H. Davenport, a fellow of the MIT Center for Digital Business, is that companies are only beginning to understand the questions they can ask of their vast stores of data - and how to build the internal structures to make the most of it. "Big data" is a fashionable, sometimes overused term for the vast amounts of information that can now be stored because of the growth of online activity and the low cost of storage.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I am 55 and my wife is 65. She only worked a few part-time jobs as she spent most of her working years raising our nine beautiful children. My question is, since she does not have enough credits to collect Social Security on her own work record, can she claim spousal benefits on my work history? If so, at what age and how will it affect my benefits? Answer: Your wife can receive spousal benefits based on your work record, but those checks can't start until you're old enough to qualify for benefits at age 62 (when she's 72)
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
The gig: As the head of Sterling Venue Ventures, Lance Sterling runs the recently renovated Saban Theatre concert venue in Beverly Hills and also owns and operates the Canyon Club in Agoura Hills. Early days: Sterling, 51, studied civil engineering at the University of Arizona. While in school, he worked in bars, nightclubs and concert venues that booked groups such as Grand Funk Railroad. "I was making more money running concerts than I would as an engineer," he said. After college, he briefly worked for a billboard company and then went into the hotel business.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | Mike Bresnahan
The triangle offense is back in Los Angeles, but not in a way that would make Phil Jackson smile. There are three distinct entities on these triangle points -- Kobe Bryant, Pau Gasol and Lakers Coach Mike D'Antoni -- and they have some differences to sort out. The rapidly expanding gap behind the scenes overshadowed the Lakers' 131-102 loss Thursday to the Oklahoma City Thunder at Chesapeake Energy Arena. Bryant doesn't like D'Antoni's spread-the-floor scheme, according to a person familiar with his thinking, and wants a more traditional offense such as the triangle or a post-up system.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - Ask Raul Ibanez why he's still able to play major league baseball effectively at an age when so many peers are retired or into coaching, and the Angels' new designated hitter responds with a question: Why not? "I have a 22-year database of pitchers, 22 years of professional experience swinging the bat," Ibanez, 41, said. "I've trained with world-class strength guys, used some of the world's best sports psychologists and physical therapists, and I still have the will and the determination.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Whatever you might say about Simon Schama, one of our most prominent and accomplished narrative historians, you can't say he's afraid to tackle broad and challenging subjects. "The Story of the Jews" is the first of a two-volume work aimed at covering 3 millenniums, from 1000 BCE to the present day, with the break coming at 1492 and the expulsion of the Jews from Spain by Ferdinand and Isabella. That's a lot of ground to cover, greater geographically if not in chronological terms than Schama's last multi-volume work, a three-tome "History of Britain" published in 2000-02 that reached all the way back to 3500 BC. Like that work, the scale of "The Story of the Jews" was dictated by the requirement of a television documentary series, scheduled to begin airing on PBS toward the end of this month.
SPORTS
March 13, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
UC Irvine's big advantage in the Big West tournament became clear at Thursday's tipoff at Honda Center. UC Riverside trotted out 6-foot-7 Taylor Johns to jump center against the Anteaters' 7-foot-6 shot eater, Mamadou Ndiaye. College basketball's tallest player won the tip and top-seeded Irvine was off and churning to a 63-43 quarterfinal victory over the bottom-seeded Highlanders. The workmanlike effort earned Irvine a trip to Friday's 6:30 p.m. semifinal game against seventh-seeded Cal Poly, a shocking 31-point winner over No. 2 UC Santa Barbara.
SPORTS
March 13, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
DENVER - The worst game the Ducks played this season before Wednesday was here in their opener, a 6-1 loss capped by Colorado Avalanche rookie Coach Patrick Roy threatening to break through a glass partition to fight Ducks Coach Bruce Boudreau. That image has lasted longer than what happened afterward: the Ducks embarking on a seven-game win streak and a 15-2-1 roll. Back in Pepsi Center on Thursday, the Ducks (43-16-7) went through perhaps their most spirited, contact-filled practice of the season, a night removed from their horrific showing in a 7-2 loss at woeful Calgary.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
A show about the late Weimar era vocal troupe the Comedian Harmonists bearing the title "Harmony" had better have memorable singing, and on that score this musical by Barry Manilow and his writing partner Bruce Sussman doesn't disappoint. In solos, duets and ensemble numbers especially, the voices soar on lilting melodies that strive to conjure the glory days of the American musical, that period bookended between Rodgers & Hammerstein and Kander & Ebb. The show's numbers may not evoke those easy-listening Manilow hits of the 1970s, but they have an ingratiating beauty that serves to remind that the man who made famous the Bruce Johnston lyric "I am music.
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