Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWorkers Compensation Appeals Board
IN THE NEWS

Workers Compensation Appeals Board

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Encino judge was awarded the prestigious Carnegie heroism award on Monday for disarming a gunman holding a lawyer hostage in his courtroom last summer. Charles Gordon, an administrative law judge for the Workers' Compensation Appeals Board, was one of 16 people cited for heroism by the Pittsburgh, Pa.-based Carnegie Hero Fund Commission. The citation carries a $2,500 reward.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 10, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
For the second time in a year, the California insurance commissioner has rejected an industry rating agency's proposal that he recommend that insurers significantly raise rates paid by employers for workers' compensation insurance. Steve Poizner today rejected a call from the California Workers' Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau to hike rates by 22.8% for policies that would be written or renewed after Jan. 1. By law, the insurance commissioner is charged with reviewing the benchmark rate considered by insurance companies in pricing future policies and recommending changes -- up or down.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
April 7, 1991
Hendrik G. Van Helden (Letters From Readers, March 10) has an incorrect understanding of the state of the law in California. If an employee is fatally injured while traveling on company business, his or her dependents cannot sue the employer for damages but must accept the death benefit fixed by the Legislature. If litigation is needed, the case must be filed with the Workers' Compensation Appeals Board, which has exclusive jurisdiction. If there is a reduction in business travel, it would be the result of factors other than potential jury awards.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2007 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
Lawyers for injured workers Friday claimed a major victory after a judge ruled that the state's formula for calculating permanent disability benefits was arbitrary. The decision came amid a rising clamor from advocates for injured workers, labor unions and Democratic leaders of the state Legislature over a landmark overhaul of California's once-troubled workers' compensation insurance system.
NEWS
September 21, 1989
For 30 years, the Workers Compensation Appeals Board has had an office in Ventura for the adjudication of work injuries. It is well situated with adequate parking, proximity to the government center, freeway and public transportation. It is also in, and next to, the largest and fourth-largest cities in Ventura County. The state has recently remodeled the building and has, within the last month, installed up-to-date computers with dedicated electrical outlets and wiring. It is a model office, especially when compared to other regional officers such as Van Nuys were overcrowded conditions make it unbearable.
NEWS
November 2, 1989
Your Oct. 26 article emphasized the inability of injured workers to get to the Workers Compensation Appeals Board if it is relocated to Agoura. The relocation will not only affect injured workers but will cause the relocation of board employees and all support industries having business at the board. The financial impact on the Ventura County area will be significant in that insurance companies, applicant and defense law firms, court reporters, doctors and medical clinics, rehabilitation centers/counselors, interpreters and investigation agencies will relocate in order to be closer to the appeals board.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2007 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
Lawyers for injured workers Friday claimed a major victory after a judge ruled that the state's formula for calculating permanent disability benefits was arbitrary. The decision came amid a rising clamor from advocates for injured workers, labor unions and Democratic leaders of the state Legislature over a landmark overhaul of California's once-troubled workers' compensation insurance system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1987 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
A cosmetologist who claims he injured his back on the job is entitled to receive workers' compensation benefits, a state appellate court in Santa Ana ruled Tuesday. The 4th District Court of Appeal rejected a Huntington Beach beauty parlor owner's contention that Kenneth Truesdale was an independent contractor and therefore exempt from workers' compensation benefits.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1993
It was heartening to read in The Times about the courageous decision of workers' compensation Judge Frank S. Falero to resist what appeared to him to be a "scheme to deceive" an employer and its insurance carrier in connection with apparently fraudulent compensation claims ("Workers' Comp Judge Balks, Cries Fraud," April 10). Of course, since I am not familiar with the evidence that came before Judge Falero in the trial process, I cannot comment on the merits of his decisions. However, there was no such reluctance on the part of the administrative director of the state Division of Workers' Compensation or its "legal adviser" to comment adversely on the trial judge's decisions, without even reviewing the record or having the case record properly before them.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
For the second time in a year, the California insurance commissioner has rejected an industry rating agency's proposal that he recommend that insurers significantly raise rates paid by employers for workers' compensation insurance. Steve Poizner today rejected a call from the California Workers' Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau to hike rates by 22.8% for policies that would be written or renewed after Jan. 1. By law, the insurance commissioner is charged with reviewing the benchmark rate considered by insurance companies in pricing future policies and recommending changes -- up or down.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1993
It was heartening to read in The Times about the courageous decision of workers' compensation Judge Frank S. Falero to resist what appeared to him to be a "scheme to deceive" an employer and its insurance carrier in connection with apparently fraudulent compensation claims ("Workers' Comp Judge Balks, Cries Fraud," April 10). Of course, since I am not familiar with the evidence that came before Judge Falero in the trial process, I cannot comment on the merits of his decisions. However, there was no such reluctance on the part of the administrative director of the state Division of Workers' Compensation or its "legal adviser" to comment adversely on the trial judge's decisions, without even reviewing the record or having the case record properly before them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Encino judge was awarded the prestigious Carnegie heroism award on Monday for disarming a gunman holding a lawyer hostage in his courtroom last summer. Charles Gordon, an administrative law judge for the Workers' Compensation Appeals Board, was one of 16 people cited for heroism by the Pittsburgh, Pa.-based Carnegie Hero Fund Commission. The citation carries a $2,500 reward.
TRAVEL
April 7, 1991
Hendrik G. Van Helden (Letters From Readers, March 10) has an incorrect understanding of the state of the law in California. If an employee is fatally injured while traveling on company business, his or her dependents cannot sue the employer for damages but must accept the death benefit fixed by the Legislature. If litigation is needed, the case must be filed with the Workers' Compensation Appeals Board, which has exclusive jurisdiction. If there is a reduction in business travel, it would be the result of factors other than potential jury awards.
NEWS
November 2, 1989
Your Oct. 26 article emphasized the inability of injured workers to get to the Workers Compensation Appeals Board if it is relocated to Agoura. The relocation will not only affect injured workers but will cause the relocation of board employees and all support industries having business at the board. The financial impact on the Ventura County area will be significant in that insurance companies, applicant and defense law firms, court reporters, doctors and medical clinics, rehabilitation centers/counselors, interpreters and investigation agencies will relocate in order to be closer to the appeals board.
NEWS
September 21, 1989
For 30 years, the Workers Compensation Appeals Board has had an office in Ventura for the adjudication of work injuries. It is well situated with adequate parking, proximity to the government center, freeway and public transportation. It is also in, and next to, the largest and fourth-largest cities in Ventura County. The state has recently remodeled the building and has, within the last month, installed up-to-date computers with dedicated electrical outlets and wiring. It is a model office, especially when compared to other regional officers such as Van Nuys were overcrowded conditions make it unbearable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1987 | JAN KLUNDER, Times Staff Writer
'Maybe we should show up and make them feel really comfortable by wearing bib overalls.' Clayton Robins workers' compensation judge When workers' compensation court convened at 9 a.m. Friday in the State Office Building in Van Nuys, two of the nine hearing rooms sported extra adornment. Sandwiched between the U. S. and California flags, a black robe hung from a coat rack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1987 | JAN KLUNDER, Times Staff Writer
'Maybe we should show up and make them feel really comfortable by wearing bib overalls.' Clayton Robins workers' compensation judge When workers' compensation court convened at 9 a.m. Friday in the State Office Building in Van Nuys, two of the nine hearing rooms sported extra adornment. Sandwiched between the U. S. and California flags, a black robe hung from a coat rack.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
Gov. Pete Wilson has appointed Kate Squires, a Riverside County lawyer who ran unsuccessfully in the June primary for the Republican nomination to the U.S. Senate, to an $88,056-a-year position on the state Workers' Compensation Appeals Board. Squires, of Corona, heads a legal education and publishing company and has experience in corporate law firms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1987 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
A cosmetologist who claims he injured his back on the job is entitled to receive workers' compensation benefits, a state appellate court in Santa Ana ruled Tuesday. The 4th District Court of Appeal rejected a Huntington Beach beauty parlor owner's contention that Kenneth Truesdale was an independent contractor and therefore exempt from workers' compensation benefits.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|