YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWorkers


September 12, 2012 | By Ronald D. White
As many as three dozen workers at a warehouse in Mira Loma walked off the job Wednesday to protest what they called poor working conditions. A spokeswoman for a group that is supporting the workers said they were suffering from poorly ventilated workspaces, high heat, and faulty and unsafe equipment. The protest took place at a warehouse operated by NFI Industries, which employs about 300 workers. NFI is a New Jersey logistics, storage and distribution services company that operates warehouses in several Southern California locations for major retailers, including Wal-Mart Stores Inc. “These workers have exhausted all options,” said Guadalupe Palma, a director of Warehouse Workers United, an organization that receives funding from the Change to Win labor federation and has been working to try to organize Inland Empire warehouse workers.
March 5, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
For workers on the East Coast, it might finally be time to invest in that jet pack. It's either that or spend an hour or more getting to work, as new data show many commuters in New York, Maryland and New Jersey do every day. Although just 8.1% of U.S. workers take 60 minutes or longer to get to work, a whopping 16.2% of people who live in New York state commute for an hour or longer each day -- one way. In Maryland, 14.8% of workers take an...
October 7, 2013 | By Emily Keeler
After months of stalled negotiations over salaries, workers at Amazon's German warehouses are threatening to walk out for the Christmas shopping season. It would not be the first time German workers walked out on Amazon . Verdi, the Services and Trade Union, has organized short strikes in Leipzig, Saxony and Bad Hersfeld this year. Workers represented by Verdi in Amazon's distribution centers have been trying to force Amazon to recognize collective bargaining agreements in the mail order and retail industry as wage benchmarks for workers in the distribution centers.
March 12, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
March Madness starts this week and there's a lot of money at stake, including more than $1 billion in wages paid to distracted workers and $2.5 billion in illegal bets. The NCAA basketball tournament will suck 90 minutes out of each workday for 2.5 million workers, according to a report from employment consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas . If last year is any indication, employers will pay out $175 million in wages to workers who are sneaking peeks at games online, checking scores or managing office pool brackets during the first two days of the tournament, according to Challenger.
July 1, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
Workers in two of Bay Area Rapid Transit's largest unions were on strike Monday morning, halting service for an estimated 400,000 passengers who use the nation's fifth-largest rail system each weekday. SEIU Local 1021 spokeswoman Cecille Isidro said workers began their strike across the Bay Area around 2 a.m. Monday after the final trains were put to bed. From a picket line at the Lake Merritt station in Oakland, she said the union expects that a majority of workers will take part in the strike.
December 17, 2013 | By Susan Rohwer, guest blogger
On Tuesday, sex worker activists will gather to mark the 11th annual International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers . Vigils in New York, Los Angeles and around the world will be held to highlight the everyday violence sex workers face and to honor those who have died. But the day is not just about remembering those lost; it's also about acknowledging sex workers as something other than victims. It's a chance for sex worker activists to fight for greater rights and visibility and to push for saner laws that make sex workers safer rather than pushing them further underground.
March 15, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Two workers were critically injured Thursday night while helping set up for this weekend's Ultra Music Festival in Miami when a giant LED video screen fell, trapping them under it, the Miami Herald reported. Fire rescue officials said both men suffered life-threatening injuries, one with both his legs broken when the screen fell. Two other workers were less severely injured by falling equipment; one was hospitalized in stable condition, the other treated at the scene. Ultra Music Festival, billed as “the largest electronic dance music festival in the world,” was still set to open at 3 p.m. EDT Friday as scheduled.
May 1, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Dining hall workers at Pomona College have voted to unionize, culminating a three-year campaign that thrust the small liberal arts college into controversy over immigration policy and labor rights. In the election Tuesday, 83 members of the dining hall staff cast ballots, voting 57 to 26 to join UNITE HERE, Local 11, a union that represents about 20,000 hospitality and food service workers in Southern California. “I feel very happy we made it,” said Benny Avina, 46, a catering chef who has worked at the college for 27 years, starting as a dishwasher.
June 14, 2012 | By David Sarno
A worker at China's Foxconn, the manufacturer that makes most of the world's Apple devices, jumped to his death Wednesday, the most recent in a string of suicides that have plagued the factory chain for years. The employee leapt from the balcony of a company-rented building in the southwestern province of Sichuan, according to police reports noted by the Associated Press. Foxconn's suicides have inflamed workers' rights advocates around the world, who have pointed to what they see as harsh working conditions at Foxconn's factories, which in addition to iPhones and iPads produce electronics for many of the largest international device makers.
October 19, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Two maintenance workers were killed Saturday when they were hit by a BART train while conducting a track inspection, officials said. “The BART police received a call...that two people had been struck and killed by a train on the track between the Walnut Creek and Pleasant Hills stations,” Ben Fairow, spokesman for the Bay Area Rapid Transit Police, said. “Our officers indeed confirmed that two people had been struck and both were fatalities.” “We have the scene locked down and we are conducting an investigation,” he said, “including interviews with everyone involved and drug testing of the train operator.” Fairow was unable to identify the victims.
Los Angeles Times Articles