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WORLD
August 3, 2011 | By Ken Elllingwood, Los Angeles Times
Nine workers from two prominent Mexican polling firms were missing Tuesday in the violence-plagued state of Michoacan, which holds elections this fall. Six pollsters from the Consulta Mitofsky firm vanished over the weekend while surveying residents in Apatzingan, a town in a rural area that has seen bloody clashes between Mexican security forces and a violent drug-trafficking gang. On Tuesday, a separate firm, Parametria, reported that three of its field workers disappeared while on the job in the same region.
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NATIONAL
April 25, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. - Aslam Khan, owner of 165 Church's Chicken eateries, still has the text message - a plea from a general manager at one of his restaurants in Indiana: “Please don't fire me. If I lose my job, I lose everything. Please let me stay in the company.” The request had moved Khan so much that he read it aloud to a round table of business executives meeting in Scottsdale this week to discuss their frustrations and concerns about immigration law - and their hope Congress passes some sort of reform to address those worries.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
March Madness starts this week and there's a lot of money at stake, including more than $1 billion in wages paid to distracted workers and $2.5 billion in illegal bets. The NCAA basketball tournament will suck 90 minutes out of each workday for 2.5 million workers, according to a report from employment consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas . If last year is any indication, employers will pay out $175 million in wages to workers who are sneaking peeks at games online, checking scores or managing office pool brackets during the first two days of the tournament, according to Challenger.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Though fast-food restaurants tout that a large proportion of their managers started in entry-level positions, a report released Thursday by the National Employment Law Project finds that few fast-food workers join management ranks.   The group, which advocates on behalf of low-wage workers, said there is limited opportunity for advancement at fast-food restaurants. Analyzing data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the report found that about 2% of jobs in the industry are classified as "managerial, professional or technical occupations.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Workers in California's beleaguered visual effects industry were left fuming Monday after a speech by Oscar-winning supervisor Bill Westenhofer was cut short -- by the ominous music of "Jaws. " Westenhofer, who led the team at Rhythm & Hues that won a visual effects award for their work on Ang Lee's "Life of Pi," had intended to talk about the plight of his industry, which has hit close to home.  The El Segundo visual effects company recently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection from creditors and laid off about 250 workers from its Los Angeles operation amid mounting losses.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
Lawyers for Inland Empire warehouse workers are raising the stakes in a legal battle with Wal-Mart Stores Inc. over hours, pay and other conditions at a giant distribution complex in Riverside County. On Friday, they unveiled an amended complaint filed in U.S. District Court alleging that Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, ultimately is responsible for pressuring a contractor and subcontractors to work more quickly. Wal-Mart said it would contest the allegation at an initial Jan. 7 court hearing.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Susan Rohwer, guest blogger
On Tuesday, sex worker activists will gather to mark the 11th annual International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers . Vigils in New York, Los Angeles and around the world will be held to highlight the everyday violence sex workers face and to honor those who have died. But the day is not just about remembering those lost; it's also about acknowledging sex workers as something other than victims. It's a chance for sex worker activists to fight for greater rights and visibility and to push for saner laws that make sex workers safer rather than pushing them further underground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Dining hall workers at Pomona College have voted to unionize, culminating a three-year campaign that thrust the small liberal arts college into controversy over immigration policy and labor rights. In the election Tuesday, 83 members of the dining hall staff cast ballots, voting 57 to 26 to join UNITE HERE, Local 11, a union that represents about 20,000 hospitality and food service workers in Southern California. “I feel very happy we made it,” said Benny Avina, 46, a catering chef who has worked at the college for 27 years, starting as a dishwasher.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2011 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
Biotech giant Amgen Inc. is laying off about 380 employees in its research and development division, saying it is restructuring operations to focus on new drugs in later, more expensive stages of development. "We're focusing on therapies that are promising," said Mary Klem, a spokeswoman for the Thousand Oaks company. "It's very expensive to conduct clinical trials. The patient population gets bigger at each phase. That's the crux of what is causing us to make these strategic changes.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2012 | By Ronald D. White
As many as three dozen workers at a warehouse in Mira Loma walked off the job Wednesday to protest what they called poor working conditions. A spokeswoman for a group that is supporting the workers said they were suffering from poorly ventilated workspaces, high heat, and faulty and unsafe equipment. The protest took place at a warehouse operated by NFI Industries, which employs about 300 workers. NFI is a New Jersey logistics, storage and distribution services company that operates warehouses in several Southern California locations for major retailers, including Wal-Mart Stores Inc. “These workers have exhausted all options,” said Guadalupe Palma, a director of Warehouse Workers United, an organization that receives funding from the Change to Win labor federation and has been working to try to organize Inland Empire warehouse workers.
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