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WORLD
August 3, 2011 | By Ken Elllingwood, Los Angeles Times
Nine workers from two prominent Mexican polling firms were missing Tuesday in the violence-plagued state of Michoacan, which holds elections this fall. Six pollsters from the Consulta Mitofsky firm vanished over the weekend while surveying residents in Apatzingan, a town in a rural area that has seen bloody clashes between Mexican security forces and a violent drug-trafficking gang. On Tuesday, a separate firm, Parametria, reported that three of its field workers disappeared while on the job in the same region.
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BUSINESS
April 7, 2013 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
WESTFIELD, Mass. - The envelope factory where Lisa Weber works is hot and noisy. A fan she brought from home helps her keep cool as she maneuvers around whirring equipment to make her quota: 750 envelopes an hour, up from 500 a few years ago. There's no resting: Between the video cameras and the constant threat of layoffs, Weber knows she must always be on her toes. The drudgery of work at National Envelope Co. used to be relieved by small perks - an annual picnic, free hams and turkeys over the holidays - but those have long since been eliminated.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Seven out of 10 workers have "checked out" at work or are "actively disengaged," according to a recent Gallup survey .  In its ongoing survey of the American workplace, Gallup found that only 30% of workers are "were engaged, or involved in, enthusiastic about, and committed to their workplace. " Although that equals the high in engagement since Gallup began studying the issue in 2000, it is overshadowed by the number of workers who aren't committed to a performing at a high level -- which Gallup says costs companies money.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
March Madness starts this week and there's a lot of money at stake, including more than $1 billion in wages paid to distracted workers and $2.5 billion in illegal bets. The NCAA basketball tournament will suck 90 minutes out of each workday for 2.5 million workers, according to a report from employment consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas . If last year is any indication, employers will pay out $175 million in wages to workers who are sneaking peeks at games online, checking scores or managing office pool brackets during the first two days of the tournament, according to Challenger.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Though fast-food restaurants tout that a large proportion of their managers started in entry-level positions, a report released Thursday by the National Employment Law Project finds that few fast-food workers join management ranks.   The group, which advocates on behalf of low-wage workers, said there is limited opportunity for advancement at fast-food restaurants. Analyzing data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the report found that about 2% of jobs in the industry are classified as "managerial, professional or technical occupations.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Workers in California's beleaguered visual effects industry were left fuming Monday after a speech by Oscar-winning supervisor Bill Westenhofer was cut short -- by the ominous music of "Jaws. " Westenhofer, who led the team at Rhythm & Hues that won a visual effects award for their work on Ang Lee's "Life of Pi," had intended to talk about the plight of his industry, which has hit close to home.  The El Segundo visual effects company recently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection from creditors and laid off about 250 workers from its Los Angeles operation amid mounting losses.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
Lawyers for Inland Empire warehouse workers are raising the stakes in a legal battle with Wal-Mart Stores Inc. over hours, pay and other conditions at a giant distribution complex in Riverside County. On Friday, they unveiled an amended complaint filed in U.S. District Court alleging that Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, ultimately is responsible for pressuring a contractor and subcontractors to work more quickly. Wal-Mart said it would contest the allegation at an initial Jan. 7 court hearing.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2012 | By Ronald D. White
As many as three dozen workers at a warehouse in Mira Loma walked off the job Wednesday to protest what they called poor working conditions. A spokeswoman for a group that is supporting the workers said they were suffering from poorly ventilated workspaces, high heat, and faulty and unsafe equipment. The protest took place at a warehouse operated by NFI Industries, which employs about 300 workers. NFI is a New Jersey logistics, storage and distribution services company that operates warehouses in several Southern California locations for major retailers, including Wal-Mart Stores Inc. “These workers have exhausted all options,” said Guadalupe Palma, a director of Warehouse Workers United, an organization that receives funding from the Change to Win labor federation and has been working to try to organize Inland Empire warehouse workers.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
For workers on the East Coast, it might finally be time to invest in that jet pack. It's either that or spend an hour or more getting to work, as new data show many commuters in New York, Maryland and New Jersey do every day. Although just 8.1% of U.S. workers take 60 minutes or longer to get to work, a whopping 16.2% of people who live in New York state commute for an hour or longer each day -- one way. In Maryland, 14.8% of workers take an...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2013 | By Emily Keeler
After months of stalled negotiations over salaries, workers at Amazon's German warehouses are threatening to walk out for the Christmas shopping season. It would not be the first time German workers walked out on Amazon . Verdi, the Services and Trade Union, has organized short strikes in Leipzig, Saxony and Bad Hersfeld this year. Workers represented by Verdi in Amazon's distribution centers have been trying to force Amazon to recognize collective bargaining agreements in the mail order and retail industry as wage benchmarks for workers in the distribution centers.
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