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NATIONAL
November 24, 2012 | By Joseph Serna
A fire erupted at the State Department headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, seriously injuring three maintenance workers. The fire ignited about 11 a.m. in ductwork on the building's seventh floor, the Associated Press reported. Employees put out the flames before firefighters arrived at the scene. Three maintenance workers were hospitalized. One of them, according to the AP, was listed in critical condition. The other two were reported in serious condition. The fire started during routine maintenance work in a mechanical area of the building, State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland told the AP. Workers temporarily evacuated the building but returned later in the day.   ALSO: Deputy at Texas pileup: "Children bleeding...cars on top of cars" Black Friday melee on video at Georgia Wal-Mart, trampling in Texas Woman who punched Wal-Mart worker, 70, gets 5 years in holiday attack Follow Nation Now on Twitter and Facebook
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
Workers in two of Bay Area Rapid Transit's largest unions were on strike Monday morning, halting service for an estimated 400,000 passengers who use the nation's fifth-largest rail system each weekday. SEIU Local 1021 spokeswoman Cecille Isidro said workers began their strike across the Bay Area around 2 a.m. Monday after the final trains were put to bed. From a picket line at the Lake Merritt station in Oakland, she said the union expects that a majority of workers will take part in the strike.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Susan Rohwer, guest blogger
On Tuesday, sex worker activists will gather to mark the 11th annual International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers . Vigils in New York, Los Angeles and around the world will be held to highlight the everyday violence sex workers face and to honor those who have died. But the day is not just about remembering those lost; it's also about acknowledging sex workers as something other than victims. It's a chance for sex worker activists to fight for greater rights and visibility and to push for saner laws that make sex workers safer rather than pushing them further underground.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Two workers were critically injured Thursday night while helping set up for this weekend's Ultra Music Festival in Miami when a giant LED video screen fell, trapping them under it, the Miami Herald reported. Fire rescue officials said both men suffered life-threatening injuries, one with both his legs broken when the screen fell. Two other workers were less severely injured by falling equipment; one was hospitalized in stable condition, the other treated at the scene. Ultra Music Festival, billed as “the largest electronic dance music festival in the world,” was still set to open at 3 p.m. EDT Friday as scheduled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Dining hall workers at Pomona College have voted to unionize, culminating a three-year campaign that thrust the small liberal arts college into controversy over immigration policy and labor rights. In the election Tuesday, 83 members of the dining hall staff cast ballots, voting 57 to 26 to join UNITE HERE, Local 11, a union that represents about 20,000 hospitality and food service workers in Southern California. “I feel very happy we made it,” said Benny Avina, 46, a catering chef who has worked at the college for 27 years, starting as a dishwasher.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Though fast-food restaurants tout that a large proportion of their managers started in entry-level positions, a report released Thursday by the National Employment Law Project finds that few fast-food workers join management ranks.   The group, which advocates on behalf of low-wage workers, said there is limited opportunity for advancement at fast-food restaurants. Analyzing data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the report found that about 2% of jobs in the industry are classified as "managerial, professional or technical occupations.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2012 | By David Sarno
A worker at China's Foxconn, the manufacturer that makes most of the world's Apple devices, jumped to his death Wednesday, the most recent in a string of suicides that have plagued the factory chain for years. The employee leapt from the balcony of a company-rented building in the southwestern province of Sichuan, according to police reports noted by the Associated Press. Foxconn's suicides have inflamed workers' rights advocates around the world, who have pointed to what they see as harsh working conditions at Foxconn's factories, which in addition to iPhones and iPads produce electronics for many of the largest international device makers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2013 | By Evan Halper
SACRAMENTO -- Now that the state is no longer in the grips of a budget crisis, public employee unions are optimistic that they finally have some leverage to negotiate a raise. Will Gov. Jerry Brown hold the line on spending, as he has vowed, and keep salaries in check? The Times' Chris Megerian takes a look at the issue in a article Monday. He writes that contracts for almost half of the state's 350,000 employees come due this summer. And the biggest unions negotiating them will be sitting across the bargaining table from an administration grateful for all that the unions did to help pass Brown's tax-hike plan in November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Two maintenance workers were killed Saturday when they were hit by a BART train while conducting a track inspection, officials said. “The BART police received a call...that two people had been struck and killed by a train on the track between the Walnut Creek and Pleasant Hills stations,” Ben Fairow, spokesman for the Bay Area Rapid Transit Police, said. “Our officers indeed confirmed that two people had been struck and both were fatalities.” “We have the scene locked down and we are conducting an investigation,” he said, “including interviews with everyone involved and drug testing of the train operator.” Fairow was unable to identify the victims.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Workers in California's beleaguered visual effects industry were left fuming Monday after a speech by Oscar-winning supervisor Bill Westenhofer was cut short -- by the ominous music of "Jaws. " Westenhofer, who led the team at Rhythm & Hues that won a visual effects award for their work on Ang Lee's "Life of Pi," had intended to talk about the plight of his industry, which has hit close to home.  The El Segundo visual effects company recently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection from creditors and laid off about 250 workers from its Los Angeles operation amid mounting losses.
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