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BUSINESS
October 20, 2011 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
Biotech giant Amgen Inc. is laying off about 380 employees in its research and development division, saying it is restructuring operations to focus on new drugs in later, more expensive stages of development. "We're focusing on therapies that are promising," said Mary Klem, a spokeswoman for the Thousand Oaks company. "It's very expensive to conduct clinical trials. The patient population gets bigger at each phase. That's the crux of what is causing us to make these strategic changes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1988
The letters in the April 26 issue impel me to write. Each writer hit out at Martin and Kathleen Feldstein's column against increasing the minimum wages. History shows from the birth of capitalism it did not work for people. Adam Smith's book "Wealth of Nations," published in 1776, showed that labor was "the source of all value" but he could not figure why, the more wealth the workers produced "the poorer the workers become." It was Karl Marx who discovered in 1844 the reason why the workers become poorer, the more they produce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - After the deaths of two workers on BART tracks, the commuter rail system's directors Thursday permanently ended the practice of making employees on the tracks solely responsible for their own safety. The directors of Bay Area Rapid Transit approved a policy that will require train operators or drivers to slow to 25 mph and be prepared to stop when approaching workers on or near the tracks. The change, expected to cause delays in passenger service, is being made after the deaths Saturday of two workers inspecting tracks when a train hit them at 60 to 70 mph. They were working under a procedure called "simple approval" that gave them no warning of approaching trains and required one of them to act as a lookout.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2005
RE "When Corporations Pull the Rug Out," by Al Martinez, Dec. 2: This piece speaks for an age in which workers in any institution are vulnerable to having the rug pulled out from under them. It's almost as if being called a Scrooge does not shame modern capitalism anymore. Doesn't that mean we have somehow lost the meaning of Christmas? FRANK M. SIFUENTES Long Beach
OPINION
May 6, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In recent years, California has become a favorite venue for workers' compensation claims by athletes with only tenuous ties to the Golden State. Many former pros have won six-figure awards for injuries built up over time even though they've never lived or worked in the state, except to train or play the occasional game here. In some cases, judges have even granted them awards over and above the ones they've already obtained in their home states. Clearly the system needs to be fixed, and five professional sports leagues have stepped forward to say so. But lawmakers shouldn't close the courthouse door completely to athletes who don't feel the brunt of their injuries until long after their playing days are over.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Julie Makinen
A brawl involving about 2,000 workers broke out Sunday night at a dormitory that houses Foxconn employees in China's Shanxi province. Forty people were taken to hospitals for medical attention and "a number" of individuals were arrested, Foxconn Technology Group said in a statement. The official New China News Agency put the number of injured at 10. Foxconn, a major supplier to many of the world's electronics giants, is perhaps best known as a maker of Apple products, including iPhones.
SPORTS
February 3, 2014 | By David Wharton
SOCHI, Russia -- The International Olympic Committee said Monday that it has intervened on behalf of workers who built venues and surrounding infrastructure at the 2014 Sochi Games. IOC President Thomas Bach said his organization found "concrete information" regarding the mistreatment of the workers. The IOC subsequently met with Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Kozak and an ombudsman for human rights regarding outstanding payments to the workers. "As a result," Bach said, "we found that 227 million rubles had been paid to workers in 13 companies.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2010 | By Don Lee
Acting quickly on a pledge in his State of the Union address, President Obama today will unveil a proposal to give a tax credit of up to $5,000 to companies for every new employee they add to their payrolls this year. A separate measure would offset the additional Social Security taxes that employers pay for boosting wages or hours of existing workers. Both programs, which combined would cost an estimated $33 billion and require congressional action, are aimed at spurring small businesses to move swiftly to hire new employees and bolster an economy that is technically growing but reeling from double-digit unemployment.
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