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December 10, 2005
RE "When Corporations Pull the Rug Out," by Al Martinez, Dec. 2: This piece speaks for an age in which workers in any institution are vulnerable to having the rug pulled out from under them. It's almost as if being called a Scrooge does not shame modern capitalism anymore. Doesn't that mean we have somehow lost the meaning of Christmas? FRANK M. SIFUENTES Long Beach
June 16, 2010
An inevitable consequence of a country's economic development is that its workforce comes to expect more. More schooling, better jobs, more money. That's what happened in the United States and Japan in the last century, and now it's happening in China, which has seen a series of labor strikes at Honda Motor Co. factories and a spate of suicides at the electronic components plants belonging to Foxconn Technology Group. Younger, better-educated factory workers with aspirations to join China's urban middle class want higher wages and more humane working conditions.
March 14, 2013 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - The decision to furlough state employees during the financial crises of recent years may have saved money in the short term but will leave a big bill down the road, the Legislature's budget advisors said Thursday. The state will owe $1 billion extra to many workers when they retire or quit, for vacation time that went unused while they were being forced to take unpaid days off. The furloughs were intended to save $5 billion from February 2009 to July 2013, effectively cutting workers' pay 5% to 14%. The $1 billion for unused vacation - some in excess of state accrual limits - will eat into those savings, according to a report by the nonpartisan Legislative Analyst's Office.
October 24, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - After the deaths of two workers on BART tracks, the commuter rail system's directors Thursday permanently ended the practice of making employees on the tracks solely responsible for their own safety. The directors of Bay Area Rapid Transit approved a policy that will require train operators or drivers to slow to 25 mph and be prepared to stop when approaching workers on or near the tracks. The change, expected to cause delays in passenger service, is being made after the deaths Saturday of two workers inspecting tracks when a train hit them at 60 to 70 mph. They were working under a procedure called "simple approval" that gave them no warning of approaching trains and required one of them to act as a lookout.
March 16, 2011 | By Walter HamiltonLos Angeles Times
American workers are more downbeat than ever about their prospects for retirement, a new study has found. But that also means they are starting to realize how bad their financial condition is. Confirming the findings of other recent research, a survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute found workers growing increasingly doubtful about their ability to finance comfortable retirements. The results were released Tuesday. The percentage of workers describing themselves as "not at all comfortable" about their retirement outlook jumped to 27% from 22% a year ago. Only 13% are "very confident.
October 20, 2011 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
Biotech giant Amgen Inc. is laying off about 380 employees in its research and development division, saying it is restructuring operations to focus on new drugs in later, more expensive stages of development. "We're focusing on therapies that are promising," said Mary Klem, a spokeswoman for the Thousand Oaks company. "It's very expensive to conduct clinical trials. The patient population gets bigger at each phase. That's the crux of what is causing us to make these strategic changes.
July 17, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
If you are a full-time employee, consider yourself lucky: Medical benefits are available to 85% of private-sector workers who work full time, according to a government report released Wednesday. By comparison, only 24% of part-time workers had employer-provided medical benefits, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. The government survey covered medical, retirement and other types of benefits typically offered by employers as of March 2013. 10 fastest-growing jobs in California In the aftermath of the recession and as employers prepare for President Obama's healthcare law to be implemented, there has been a sharp rise in part-time employment and other contingent work.  About 8.2 million Americans are working part time involuntarily, according to BLS figures . These workers are unable to get full-time work due to slack economic conditions or a lack of full-time positions available.
February 3, 2014 | By David Wharton
SOCHI, Russia -- The International Olympic Committee said Monday that it has intervened on behalf of workers who built venues and surrounding infrastructure at the 2014 Sochi Games. IOC President Thomas Bach said his organization found "concrete information" regarding the mistreatment of the workers. The IOC subsequently met with Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Kozak and an ombudsman for human rights regarding outstanding payments to the workers. "As a result," Bach said, "we found that 227 million rubles had been paid to workers in 13 companies.
January 29, 2010 | By Don Lee
Acting quickly on a pledge in his State of the Union address, President Obama today will unveil a proposal to give a tax credit of up to $5,000 to companies for every new employee they add to their payrolls this year. A separate measure would offset the additional Social Security taxes that employers pay for boosting wages or hours of existing workers. Both programs, which combined would cost an estimated $33 billion and require congressional action, are aimed at spurring small businesses to move swiftly to hire new employees and bolster an economy that is technically growing but reeling from double-digit unemployment.
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