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OPINION
April 27, 2012
Re "Mayor's plan would lay off 231 workers," April 21 I never thought I would hear anything from L.A. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa that made any sense, so I was amazed to read his proposal to increase the retirement age of new civilian city employees to 67 and limit pensions to 75% of a worker's income. Taxpayers can only pray that he will be able to implement his proposal soon. It's too bad that he also didn't include police officers and firefighters in his common-sense approach.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
After years of eliminating jobs in Southern California, aerospace giant Boeing Co. announced plans to increase its engineering workforce in Long Beach and Seal Beach by 1,000 positions. It is a rare and welcome development for the Southland's beleaguered aerospace industry, which has been stung by layoffs and assembly line closures for decades. "I couldn't be happier for the region," Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster said. "We want to continue to carry on our aviation tradition here.
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BUSINESS
February 10, 2011 | Bloomberg News
MannKind Corp., the unprofitable biotechnology company that failed to win U.S. approval last month to market its first product, said it will cut about 41 percent of its workforce. The firings will be completed by mid-April and reduce the number of company employees to 257, Valencia, California-based MannKind said today in a regulatory filing. MannKind, founded by billionaire inventor Alfred Mann, is restructuring its operations to focus on winning Food and Drug Administration approval for Afrezza, an inhaled insulin for diabetes, Mann said today in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday confirmed former Councilwoman Jan Perry's appointment as head of a new agency charged with spurring business activity and employment in the city. Mayor Eric Garcetti in July chose Perry, a rival in this year's mayoral race, as interim general manager of his Economic and Workforce Development Department. Last month, he decided to make the appointment permanent. On a unanimous vote, the council approved Garcetti's selection of Perry, who served as a council member for 12 years before running for mayor.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
After years of eliminating jobs in Southern California, aerospace giant Boeing Co. announced plans to increase its engineering workforce in Long Beach and Seal Beach by 1,000 positions. It is a rare and welcome development for the Southland's beleaguered aerospace industry, which has been stung by layoffs and assembly line closures for decades. "I couldn't be happier for the region," Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster said. "We want to continue to carry on our aviation tradition here.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
More bad news for BlackBerry (at this point, is there any other kind?): The Canadian smartphone maker will reportedly lay off up to 40% of its workforce by the end of the year. This coming from the Wall Street Journal , which cited unnamed sources "familiar with the matter" saying the cuts would be in all departments and occur in waves, "likely affecting several thousand employees. " PHOTOS: 10 signs it's time to upgrade your computer We called BlackBerry for comment and got the following statement: "We will not comment on rumors and speculation.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
Newport Corp., an Irvine-based maker of laser and optical equipment, said Tuesday that it would fire as much as 10% of its workforce and shift more manufacturing to lower-cost facilities in China. Newport had about 2,000 employees as of December, according to Bloomberg data. The restructuring will improve Newport's operating profit by $11 million to $14 million in 2009, the company said. The company said it still expected third-quarter revenue of $106 million to $112 million and fourth-quarter sales of $115 million to $125 million.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2013 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
It all started with the Kingston Trio. One day in 1963, a San Diego kid and his friends got their hands on an album by the popular folk group. Greg Deering, 12 at the time, recalls studying the musicians on the cover and thinking, "I've got to get a banjo" - not out of love for the twangy instrument but mainly because his pal already had a guitar. Fifty years later, Greg, his wife, Janet, and daughter Jamie preside over the bestselling banjo-making business in the U.S. From a small Spring Valley factory, the Deering Banjo Co. is having its best year ever, defying the U.S. skills gap and California's manufacturing doldrums.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Aerospace giant Boeing Co. announced that it would reduce its workforce in Southern California by 200 to 300 people who are part of its research and development unit. The reductions, which will affect employees in the company's commercial, defense and space units, are set to begin during the first quarter of 2014 and expected to be completed by the end of 2015. Boeing has about 700 employees in the R&D unit spread across Long Beach, Seal Beach, Huntington Beach and El Segundo.
TRAVEL
May 20, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Question: My wife and I recently returned from a nine-day trip to London, and we noticed that all the hotel staff was from non-British European countries and a few from countries in Africa. We also noticed that all the staff at the restaurants and some of the staff at the pubs where we ate and enjoyed their ales were from other European countries. Is this because these are jobs British workers do not want to do, or are there other reasons for this? Ben Juarez Los Angeles Answer: If you don't believe London is a world city, take a look at its restaurants.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Aerospace giant Boeing Co. announced that it would reduce its workforce in Southern California by 200 to 300 people who are part of its research and development unit. The reductions, which will affect employees in the company's commercial, defense and space units, are set to begin during the first quarter of 2014 and expected to be completed by the end of 2015. Boeing has about 700 employees in the R&D unit spread across Long Beach, Seal Beach, Huntington Beach and El Segundo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2013 | Elaine Woo
Suzanne M. Bianchi, a UCLA sociologist who helped alter perceptions of working mothers during three decades investigating changes in American family life, died Nov. 4 at her home in Santa Monica. She was 61. The cause was pancreatic cancer, said her daughter Jennifer Browning. An expert on gender, work and families, Bianchi was best known for her research examining the amount of time mothers spent with their children. Most surprising was the finding she reported in 2000 that despite a dramatic influx of women into the workforce, the amount of time spent with children was relatively unchanged.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - After working at the top levels of state government in three administrations, Marty Morgenstern is calling it quits - again. This time, California's outgoing Labor and Workforce Development secretary is stepping down as head of the agency that oversees unemployment insurance, workers' compensation and on-the-job safety. At age 78, he has worked on and off for Gov. Jerry Brown, himself 75 years old. Morgenstern, who will remain an unpaid senior advisor to the governor, distilled his theory of government work to just three sentences: "We never have enough money.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
More bad news for BlackBerry (at this point, is there any other kind?): The Canadian smartphone maker will reportedly lay off up to 40% of its workforce by the end of the year. This coming from the Wall Street Journal , which cited unnamed sources "familiar with the matter" saying the cuts would be in all departments and occur in waves, "likely affecting several thousand employees. " PHOTOS: 10 signs it's time to upgrade your computer We called BlackBerry for comment and got the following statement: "We will not comment on rumors and speculation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
For three years, Triana Williams has searched for a job. Between caring for her elderly grandmother and raising her young sister, the 24-year-old has filled out application after application at Ralphs, Rite Aid, Whole Foods, Ross, Payless and Starbucks. She calls to follow up, but they wave her off, Williams said. "They tell me I need experience to get the job," Williams said in her Venice apartment. "But you have to get a job to get experience. " Teenagers and young adults are still mired in dire levels of unemployment in Los Angeles County, years after the recession officially ended.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla (D-Concord) says that all she wanted to do was make it easier for scientists to get eggs from women for fertility research. Currently, women can be paid for their eggs by individuals undergoing fertility treatments in private clinics, and they get a average of $9,000 - sometimes much more. But the state has a ban on paying women to donate eggs for scientific studies. This year, the Bay Area lawmaker wrote a bill sponsored by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine to scrap the 7-year-old ban. She proposed allowing payments of up to $10,000 to egg donors for their time, inconvenience and discomfort.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
Mechanics for American Airlines may soon check their mail and find a strange package: airplane vomit bags. They're part of a campaign by the Transport Workers Union to fend off a challenge from a rival union: the Teamsters, which wants the mechanics to defect to its ranks. The bag is part of a Transport Workers' defense campaign, which includes ads on billboards and in magazines with the slogan: "Teamster Air: More job departures to China than any other union. " Members are valuable to labor unions for the millions they pay in dues, as well as the clout that comes along with the potential votes members cast in U.S. elections.
WORLD
August 1, 2013 | By Anthee Carassava
ATHENS - Greece's Parliament last month approved the first official culling of the country's bloated public sector. The move, opposed by government workers but viewed by many economists as long overdue for an indebted economy, will push 25,000 civil servants into a "mobility scheme," giving them eight months to find work in another state department or get fired. Kyriakos Mitsotakis, the young Harvard-cum-Stanford educated economist who fills the country's least coveted government job - as minister of administrative reform, a stuffy-sounding title that puts him in the thick of controversy - spoke last week to The Times about efforts to pare back public employment, the controversial closure of the state broadcaster and the tough austerity measures demanded by international lenders.
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