Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWorking Mothers
IN THE NEWS

Working Mothers

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1993
Being an artist requires time, effort, devotion and sacrifice. It means making one's art a priority. Carnes' Mother's Day article reaffirmed something I've know for a long time. Being a good mother is an art. KAY BAUR Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
June 12, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Glen Johnson, Los Angeles Times
ISTANBUL, Turkey - With swagger and grand designs, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan rose to power more than a decade ago, heralding a new Islamist-based democracy he envisioned as a model for a Muslim world caught in the grip of autocrats, kings and despots. But more than two weeks of protest against Erdogan's increasingly authoritarian rule have brought a reckoning to a leader who, despite his political astuteness, has miscalculated the fervor from a large part of an electorate opposed to the creeping religious conservatism of his Justice and Development Party, or AKP. Erdogan is still very much in control, and few would venture that the crisis will bring him down, but the protests have hurt him politically and exposed misgivings within his party.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 13, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Working mothers may be less depressed and healthier than their stay-at-home counterparts, a study finds. There may also be advantages to working part time as opposed to full time, as women who put in less than 40 hours a week were more sensitive toward their preschool children. They were also as involved in their children's school as were stay-at-home mothers, but more than mothers who worked full time. In the study, published in the December issue of the Journal of Family Psychology , 1,364 mothers were interviewed and observed beginning right after the birth of their child through fifth grade about such subjects as depression, health status, juggling work and family life, and parenting.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2013 | By Emily Alpert, Los Angeles Times
Mothers are breadwinners for a record share of American families, as more women bring up children on their own and more married mothers outearn their husbands, an analysis of census data shows. The new reality is a dramatic shift from decades ago, the Pew Research Center found in a study released Wednesday. Two years ago, more than 40% of American households with children relied on a mother as their biggest or only source of income - a massive jump from 11% of families in 1960. Two things drove the change: Single mothers now make up a quarter of all U.S. households with children, the Pew analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data found.
NEWS
June 22, 1987 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
Katherine, time to wake up now. It's a school day and Mommy has to get to work. Seriously, now, we don't have much time. No, please don't get the Legos out now. We have to eat. How come you have only one sock on? Now , Katherine! You've got two minutes to get dressed. I'm counting. I don't know where your Care Bear undies are. There isn't time to look for them. Put these on. Look, it isn't necessary to cry. These undies are perfectly fine.
NEWS
August 10, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a thinly masked attack on the Bush Administration, Hillary Clinton on Sunday praised working mothers who have excelled while juggling maternal demands and said American women need "a helping hand" rather than a "lecture from Washington on family values." Addressing an awards luncheon sponsored by the American Bar Assn.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1988 | Associated Press
More than three out of four working mothers who responded to a magazine survey said they alone get dinner on the table for the family when they come home from the job. Not only do 77% of the women prepare dinner by themselves, 59% set the table and 64% do the after-dinner cleanup without help, Working Mother magazine says in its February issue. The questions were published in the magazine in April and drew responses from 2,811 women around the country.
NEWS
March 20, 1986 | DOUG BROWN and DEBRA SORRENTINO LARSON, Times Staff Writer
Six years ago, a newspaper notice for a novel child-development study caught Pearl Taylor's eye. Fascinated by the prospect of predicting an infant's intellect, the former teacher volunteered her son, Benjamin. Relaxing recently in her comfortable Sherman Oaks home, she said, "I had a hunch early on that Ben was special. He seemed to be really bright." Through the project, her hunch was confirmed, she added with a smile.
NEWS
December 26, 1989 | From TIMES WIRE SERVICES
A nanny magazine on the newsstands since last May has helped make the task of finding quality child care a lot easier for American families. Gillian Gordon, working mother of two, launched the magazine on the advice of her husband after she found herself short of household help. She says that when she lived in Great Britain, she was accustomed to consulting magazines such as Nursery World or The Lady to find qualified child-care professionals.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
In her new book, “Lean In,” Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg advises women to do just that. The  message is her “sort of feminist manifesto”: Take a seat at the table, speak up, and don't worry about pleasing everyone. If you want to make it to the top, you can't demure.  But what about women who find their calling outside of the workplace - like mothers who choose to stay home and raise their kids? Are they still feminists if they choose a domestic path? New York magazine recently sparked a debate with its cover story, “ The Retro Wife ,” by Lisa Miller.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Bonnie Franklin, the actress who created an indelible television character playing a divorced, working mother of two headstrong daughters on the long-running series "One Day at a Time," died Friday at her Los Angeles home. She was 69. The cause was complications from pancreatic cancer, her family announced. By the mid-1970s, Franklin was a theater veteran who had earned a Tony nomination for her performance in the Broadway musical "Applause" when she was offered a different kind of role, one that was not then the usual fare on network television.
NEWS
December 13, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Working mothers may be less depressed and healthier than their stay-at-home counterparts, a study finds. There may also be advantages to working part time as opposed to full time, as women who put in less than 40 hours a week were more sensitive toward their preschool children. They were also as involved in their children's school as were stay-at-home mothers, but more than mothers who worked full time. In the study, published in the December issue of the Journal of Family Psychology , 1,364 mothers were interviewed and observed beginning right after the birth of their child through fifth grade about such subjects as depression, health status, juggling work and family life, and parenting.
HEALTH
November 30, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
With growing evidence that the American dad has stepped up his game when it comes to housework and child care, U.S. households would seem to have been swept clean of gender inequity. But a new study finds that women outpace men in doing more than one task at a time - and they are paying an emotional cost for doing so. The findings, published Thursday in the American Sociological Review, come from a two-year study of 500 middle-class, dual-earner families from eight urban and suburban communities across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
A dozen years ago, my editor at the Los Angeles Times asked if I wanted to interview novelist Mary Gordon, who was in Los Angeles on a book tour. Enormously pregnant, I said yes, partly because I love Mary Gordon and partly because her hotel was two blocks away from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center — if I went into labor during the interview, I figured I could just walk. Given my state and Gordon's sympathetic nature, our conversation turned toward the difficulties of working and, in particular, writing mothers.
NATIONAL
January 16, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz
The number of women who are their families' sole breadwinners has risen, as has the number of unemployed fathers, according to Census Bureau data released Friday. The trend has been accelerated by the recession, but what's unclear is whether the shift will continue, said Kristin Smith, a family demographer at the University of New Hampshire. "Whether this trend is short-lived or is lasting will depend on how the economy comes out of the recession," she said. If the male-dominated jobs in manufacturing and construction industries don't pick up, the nation could see a continued reliance on women as the only wage earners for families, Smith said.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2007 | Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writer
The young professional woman was in a bind. She had a job interview scheduled with a prospective boss, but she didn't have a baby-sitter. Not even her Harvard law degree could help her. So Michelle Obama -- still in maternity clothes -- strapped her newborn daughter, Sasha, in the stroller and headed out to meet Michael E. Riordan, president and chief executive of the University of Chicago Medical Center.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2007 | From the Associated Press
An increasing portion of America's working mothers says their ideal situation would include a part-time job, rather than working full time or staying at home, a new national survey finds. The Pew Research Center survey, being released today, found that 21% of working mothers with children younger than 18 viewed full-time work as the best arrangement, down from 32% in 1997. Sixty percent of the working mothers said a part-time job would be best, up from 48% 10 years ago.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|