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Workplace Diversity

BUSINESS
October 10, 2001 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Speakers who make a living on the rubber-chicken circuit, regaling conventions and seminars with motivational lectures, have experienced a sharp drop in demand for their services since the terrorist attacks. And the slump in bookings could continue for months, said Jim Rhode, president of the 4,000-member National Speakers Assn., the nation's largest group of professional speakers.
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BUSINESS
March 6, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atop General Electric's Rockefeller Center on Thursday, the Palo Alto-based Business Enterprise Trust bestowed five awards on an eclectic collection of business innovators at a ceremony that reflected the touch of its founder, film and television producer Norman Lear.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1995 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most women still haven't risen above the "glass ceiling," but three companies on Wednesday were recognized for at least helping some break through. Hoechst Celanese Corp., Knight-Ridder Inc. and Texas Instruments Inc. won the 1996 Catalyst Award for their efforts to promote women within their corporate structures.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1995 | From Dow Jones News Service
A consortium of high-profile firms, including Chrysler Corp. and Citicorp, believes it has found the answer to the shortage of talented minority job candidates: Persuade top-notch minority business professionals to leave well-paying jobs at corporations throughout the country in order to pursue careers in academia. That's right. Academia. As in research and libraries and teaching. It's all part of a new multimillion-dollar initiative called the "Ph.D. Project."
OPINION
June 30, 2009
In ruling that New Haven, Conn., improperly abandoned a test for firefighters that resulted in no promotions for African Americans, five conservatives on the U.S. Supreme Court have disappointed civil rights groups and provoked an animated dissent from their liberal colleagues. This page is closer to the dissenters in principle, but Monday's decision isn't the disaster for diversity in the workplace that many feared. Although the court split on familiar ideological lines, Justice Anthony M.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2009 | Dawn C. Chmielewski
A group of Walt Disney Co. shareholders wants a say on the wages and benefits paid to the company's executives. The proposal would give Disney investors a nonbinding, advisory vote on the pay packages given to Chief Executive Bob Iger and other top executives. The measure reflects growing investor ire over generous executive compensation.
NEWS
October 10, 1995
While the Los Angeles Police Department was again coming under public fire in the wake of the O.J. Simpson trial, a long-planned program to heighten officer awareness of racial, gender and cultural differences began Sept. 19 in a standard-issue classroom in the Rampart Division. The goal is to improve relations and strengthen cross-cultural communications with the community, though it is too early to assess the effectiveness.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So controversial has diversity training become that even trainers who respect each other sometimes find themselves at loggerheads over whether such courses cause more harm than good. Such is the case with Stephen M. Paskoff and David Tulin, two sought-after trainers who speak highly of each other and who have occasionally shared a podium to lecture on workplace diversity and fair employment practices.
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