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Workplace Diversity

SPORTS
January 23, 2003 | J.A. Adande, Times Staff Writer
Civil rights lawyers Johnnie L. Cochran and Cyrus Mehri said the NFL has progressed toward more inclusive hiring procedures for head coaches, but they challenged the league to strictly enforce the new guidelines instituted last month and to improve minority hiring in the front office. "We've asked the league to put some teeth behind this to level the playing field," Cochran said Wednesday at a news conference in which the attorneys were joined by former NFL stars Kellen Winslow and Warren Moon.
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BUSINESS
March 6, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atop General Electric's Rockefeller Center on Thursday, the Palo Alto-based Business Enterprise Trust bestowed five awards on an eclectic collection of business innovators at a ceremony that reflected the touch of its founder, film and television producer Norman Lear.
OPINION
June 30, 2009
In ruling that New Haven, Conn., improperly abandoned a test for firefighters that resulted in no promotions for African Americans, five conservatives on the U.S. Supreme Court have disappointed civil rights groups and provoked an animated dissent from their liberal colleagues. This page is closer to the dissenters in principle, but Monday's decision isn't the disaster for diversity in the workplace that many feared. Although the court split on familiar ideological lines, Justice Anthony M.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1995 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most women still haven't risen above the "glass ceiling," but three companies on Wednesday were recognized for at least helping some break through. Hoechst Celanese Corp., Knight-Ridder Inc. and Texas Instruments Inc. won the 1996 Catalyst Award for their efforts to promote women within their corporate structures.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1995 | From Dow Jones News Service
A consortium of high-profile firms, including Chrysler Corp. and Citicorp, believes it has found the answer to the shortage of talented minority job candidates: Persuade top-notch minority business professionals to leave well-paying jobs at corporations throughout the country in order to pursue careers in academia. That's right. Academia. As in research and libraries and teaching. It's all part of a new multimillion-dollar initiative called the "Ph.D. Project."
NEWS
October 10, 1995
While the Los Angeles Police Department was again coming under public fire in the wake of the O.J. Simpson trial, a long-planned program to heighten officer awareness of racial, gender and cultural differences began Sept. 19 in a standard-issue classroom in the Rampart Division. The goal is to improve relations and strengthen cross-cultural communications with the community, though it is too early to assess the effectiveness.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2009 | Dawn C. Chmielewski
A group of Walt Disney Co. shareholders wants a say on the wages and benefits paid to the company's executives. The proposal would give Disney investors a nonbinding, advisory vote on the pay packages given to Chief Executive Bob Iger and other top executives. The measure reflects growing investor ire over generous executive compensation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2010 | Sandy Banks
Onstage at the swanky Los Angeles Athletic Club, a panel of successful black men and women —lawyers, professors and business owners — was offering relationship advice. Hundreds of women had paid $10 to hear it. Dozens lined up to ask questions: Given the shortage of black men, should women compromise on monogamy? What's more important in a relationship, chemistry or stability? Why do black men find successful women so intimidating? But I found the more interesting talk down the hall, among strangers in the ladies' room.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2010 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
One critic likened cable TV giant Comcast Corp. to a plantation, while another pointed to the BP oil spill disaster as what could happen when companies escape tough regulatory scrutiny. Then an influential congresswoman dropped a bomb by hinting that Comcast had tried to buy her support for one of the biggest media deals in history. Those were some of criticisms and charges that flew during a field hearing held Monday by the House Judiciary Committee at the California Science Center in South Los Angeles to review the proposed Comcast-NBC Universal Inc. merger.
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