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Workplace Safety

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2001
Re "GOP Moves to Nullify Ergonomics Regulations," March 3: The cost to corporations to prevent injury: minor. The cost of injuries not prevented: immeasurable. In my case, a $50 corporate expenditure would have prevented $3 million-plus in lifetime costs to myself and other taxpayers. Why should other workers finance the costs of injury--Social Security disability, workers' comp, medical cost-shifting by workers' comp to private insurance and the injured, lost taxable wages and shattered lives?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
State regulators cited a Bay Area-based adult film company over workplace safety violations, assessing fines of more than $78,000. Cal-OSHA opened an investigation into San Francisco-based Kink Studios, which runs a network of sites, in August, in response to a complaint filed by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation . The foundation's complaint related to a July 31 shoot involving actress Cameron Bay, who tested positive for HIV shortly thereafter,...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
State regulators cited a Bay Area-based adult film company over workplace safety violations, assessing fines of more than $78,000. Cal-OSHA opened an investigation into San Francisco-based Kink Studios, which runs a network of sites, in August, in response to a complaint filed by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation . The foundation's complaint related to a July 31 shoot involving actress Cameron Bay, who tested positive for HIV shortly thereafter,...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
The state agency overseeing workplace safety has opened an investigation into an adult film studio over a shoot involving an actress who last week tested positive for HIV. Cal/OSHA opened the investigation last week into San Francisco-based Kink Studios, which runs a network of fetish sites, in response to a complaint filed by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, agency spokesman Greg Siggins said. Adult film production came to a halt after the actress, who works under the screen name Cameron Bay, tested positive for HIV in one of the industry's regular required screenings for sexually transmitted diseases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Labor Department issued a critical report on enforcement of workplace safety in California on Tuesday and ordered the state to fix myriad problems, including poor training of safety inspectors and delays in responding to complaints. Federal officials took aim at the state Division of Occupational Safety and Health, saying, among other things, that inspectors do not always review a company's history statewide before deciding whether to cite it for repeat violations. They also found that the division's appeals process "falls short.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | BOB BAKER, Times Labor Writer
An organization that has bitterly criticized the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration for lax enforcement in past years said Saturday that it is finally seeing some promising efforts from the agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
William D. Ford, 77, a U.S. congressman from Michigan for 30 years who dedicated himself to workplace safety and expanding educational opportunities for children, died Saturday at his home in Ypsilanti Township, Mich., of complications from a stroke. A House member from 1965 to 1995, representing Michigan's 15th and 13th congressional districts, Ford served as chairman of the House Committee on Education and Labor and as chairman of the House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2002 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tony Mazzocchi, a longtime advocate for workplace safety whose disenchantment with traditional politics led him to organize the nation's first labor party in 70 years, died at his home in Washington, D.C., on Saturday. He was 76 and had pancreatic cancer. Mazzocchi brought 1,400 union leaders to a Cleveland convention hall in 1996 to form the Labor Party.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1994 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Murders and traffic accidents increased as causes of on-the-job deaths last year, but the overall level of workplace fatalities was little changed from 1992, the Labor Department reported Wednesday. Experts said the report, while reflecting advances over the years in preventing deaths on the factory floor, underscores a need for authorities to pay more attention to less traditional job hazards such as violence and highway accidents. The government said 6,271 U.S.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | JOHN FLESHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rep. William D. Ford was a 20-year-old freshman at Nebraska Teachers College when his father died while working at a Michigan automobile plant. It was a heart attack, the company insisted. But the suspicious son crept into the plant, interviewed employees and finally learned the truth: Upholstery had caught fire, and his father was overcome by toxic smoke as he battled the flames.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
The state agency overseeing workplace safety has opened an investigation into an adult-film studio over a shoot involving an actress who last week tested positive for HIV. Cal/OSHA opened the investigation Thursday into San Francisco-based Kink Studios, which runs a network of fetish sites--in response to a complaint filed by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, agency spokesman Greg Siggins said. Adult-film production came to a halt after the actress, who works under the screen name Cameron Bay, tested positive for HIV in one of the regular sexually transmitted disease screenings required in the industry.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2013 | By Marisa Gerber
An explosion Thursday morning at a steel plant near St. Louis injured at least nine people, two of them critically, and spurred an investigation by federal workplace safety officials. Firefighters in Granite City, Ill., just east of the Missouri state line, got a call about 8 a.m. to respond to an explosion at American Steel, Fire Chief Tim Connolly told the Los Angeles Times. When fire officials arrived at the plant, employees told them they suspected it was a natural gas explosion, Connolly said, adding that firefighters stayed on the scene for about an hour to investigate.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
"These guys are soft right now," Paul Martinez said. "They're going to struggle. " He was right. We were watching a group of apprentice ironworkers with hard hats on their heads and 35-pound tool belts around their waists trying to climb a vertical girder, using nothing but hand strength and the leverage of their work boots on slippery steel. The girder was marked at 10 feet with a strip of white tape. That was the finish line. As we watched, one made it and eight failed. Some could barely get one foot off the ground before giving up. "By Friday, they'll all be making it," Martinez said.
OPINION
January 2, 2012
City Atty. Carmen Trutanich has gone to court to block a proposed Los Angeles city initiative requiring performers in adult films to use condoms on the set. His motivations make sense - he believes that the ballot measure, even if adopted, would infringe on state regulatory power and would be struck down in court; he wants to save the city from the needless expense of conducting a special election, and perhaps the additional cost of defending a...
NATIONAL
February 26, 2011
Details and ramifications of the House budget cuts have emerged in the last week. If the House-passed reductions are enacted, this is what can be expected, according to lawmakers and advocacy groups: Education Head Start ($1.1 billion): Could cut enrollment for 200,000 preschoolers and could cut as many as 55,000 teachers. Pell Grants ($5.6 billion): Reduces aid per student up to 15%, affects up to 9 million college students. Health Health overhaul: Prohibits funding for President Obama's healthcare reform, could hold up enforcement of provisions such as those requiring coverage for those with pre-existing conditions.
OPINION
October 29, 2010 | By Dan Rush
Critics of Proposition 19,- which would legalize the private possession of limited quantities of marijuana by adults and allow local governments to regulate its commercial production and retail distribution, will do and say just about anything. Case in point: Radio ads sponsored by the California Chamber of Commerce allege that passage of the measure will threaten workplace safety, a campaign The Times reported on in an Oct. 27 article . The claim is a bald-faced lie. Proposition 19 seeks to decriminalize private, adult cannabis consumption while preserving existing legal prohibitions on activities that threaten public safety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1995 | PAUL FELDMAN and JEFF LEEDS and JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the wake of the shooting of four city supervisory employees, the head of the city Personnel Department on Thursday called for an investigation to determine whether officials failed to adequately heed warning signs that the alleged killer could turn violent. Personnel Department general manager Faye Washington and other top city officials urged further steps to make city buildings as safe as possible for employees and the public.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The byword of business is "productivity." Do it faster, and do more with less. Assembly lines have been speeded up. Some jobs have been redesigned for efficiency so that workers perform fewer tasks but do them more frequently. The changes have translated into day-to-day workplace practices that have resulted in higher injury rates and--gradually--public outrage over the fragile health of the American worker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Labor Department issued a critical report on enforcement of workplace safety in California on Tuesday and ordered the state to fix myriad problems, including poor training of safety inspectors and delays in responding to complaints. Federal officials took aim at the state Division of Occupational Safety and Health, saying, among other things, that inspectors do not always review a company's history statewide before deciding whether to cite it for repeat violations. They also found that the division's appeals process "falls short.
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