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BUSINESS
July 25, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER, Times Staff Writer
Despite widespread recognition that democracy in the workplace can help boost productivity, only one-quarter of the nation's largest firms have actively promoted greater worker involvement in company operations, according to a study by the U.S. General Accounting Office and a team of USC researchers. The survey of senior managers at 479 of 1,000 large U.S.
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BUSINESS
April 12, 2011 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
You're a tech start-up with no money but you need an office. Coloft in Santa Monica is emerging as a solution, offering shared work spaces, office equipment — and valuable intangibles. "It's sort of like a real-life social network," said Coloft co-founder Cameron Kashani. "We've got the printer, scanner, fax, Wi-Fi, fridge, microwave, coffee. But that's not the reason people come here. People come here because of the community, because of the other people that are here. " And, on any given weekday, a walk into Coloft offers up a taste of the L.A.-area's start-up scene, with entrepreneurs working side by side, sometimes offering each other advice and occasionally even collaborating on projects.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1997 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's tempting to suggest that this column about "Work/Space: Visual Relations Incorporate" (at the UC Irvine Art Gallery through Feb. 8) should be read only by people with advanced degrees and specialized talents who have toiled at low-level office jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1997 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's tempting to suggest that this column about "Work/Space: Visual Relations Incorporate" (at the UC Irvine Art Gallery through Feb. 8) should be read only by people with advanced degrees and specialized talents who have toiled at low-level office jobs.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2011 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
You're a tech start-up with no money but you need an office. Coloft in Santa Monica is emerging as a solution, offering shared work spaces, office equipment — and valuable intangibles. "It's sort of like a real-life social network," said Coloft co-founder Cameron Kashani. "We've got the printer, scanner, fax, Wi-Fi, fridge, microwave, coffee. But that's not the reason people come here. People come here because of the community, because of the other people that are here. " And, on any given weekday, a walk into Coloft offers up a taste of the L.A.-area's start-up scene, with entrepreneurs working side by side, sometimes offering each other advice and occasionally even collaborating on projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2012
HAPPY HOUR Rock & Reilly's Irish Pub 8911 W. Sunset Blvd. 4-7 p.m. Friday (310) 360-1400 'SINGLES' SCREENING '90s party at Cinefamily 611 N. Fairfax Ave. 10 p.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, $12 Cinefamily.org HOMOEROTIC V-DAY READING Workspace Gallery 2601 Pasadena Ave. 6-9 p.m. Sunday Workspace2601.com CONCERT Robin Thicke Club Nokia, 800 W. Olympic Blvd. 8 p.m. Tuesday, $50-$75 Goldenvoice.com V-DAY DINNER Caulfield's Beverly Hills 9360 Wilshire Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2005 | Hugh Hart, Special to The Times
Annabelle Gurwitch was ecstatic when she was cast two years ago in the New York production of "Writers Block," a pair of one-act plays written and directed by Woody Allen. Like many actors, Gurwitch was a huge fan who kept Allen's published scripts, his short story collections and his DVDs proudly displayed in her Los Feliz home. A few days into rehearsal, Gurwitch became less of a fan. She was fired.
NEWS
March 19, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Doug Patton and his 12-person design firm were chosen by Apple Computer Corp. to design a new kind of high-technology office, they ascended into industrial design heaven. Like other small industrial design consultants, Costa Mesa-based Patton Design makes its living improving the form and function of products ranging from computers to stereos to medical devices.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1998
"A Perfect Ganesh"--Terrence McNally's seriocomic play about women friends on an odyssey of self-discovery in India features, from left, Louise Sorel, Bernard White, Lois Nettleton and Christopher Randolph. Ends Friday at the Odyssey Theatre Ensemble in West L.A. * "Not Like Crocker"--Chris Widney's comedy, set at various weddings and funerals involving three women clinging to their dreams and their friendship, opens tonight at the Theatre/Theater Workspace.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1995 | Jack Searles
Packard Bell Inc., a Westlake Village producer of personal computers and software, has introduced Study, a software program that allows a user to easily make use of a number of PC functions. Study is accessed through a picture of a den that includes a stereo, fax machine, speaker phone, television set and answering machine. The user accesses these functions by clicking a mouse on the picture of the desired appliance.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER, Times Staff Writer
Despite widespread recognition that democracy in the workplace can help boost productivity, only one-quarter of the nation's largest firms have actively promoted greater worker involvement in company operations, according to a study by the U.S. General Accounting Office and a team of USC researchers. The survey of senior managers at 479 of 1,000 large U.S.
TRAVEL
November 15, 2009 | Susan Derby
A new hotel rate during New York's coldest months will do much to warm visitors' hearts, with prices dropping below $100. You'll get all the electronic conveniences found in more expensive hotels -- flat-screen TV, Wi-Fi, etc. The catch: You share a bathroom. The deal: At the Pod Hotel, at 230 E. 51st St., the cheapest accommodation is a single pod room. You may have to share a bathroom with strangers, but you get stylish digs with a twin bed, workspace, WiFi, iPod docking station and LCD TV. I found one of these pod rooms in January for just $79 per night (pretax)
BUSINESS
March 23, 2003 | Claudia Eller and Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writers
In January 1996, Nia Vardalos stepped onstage at an HBO-sponsored free theater "workspace" in Hollywood and made a bit of show business history with a 20-minute monologue about her mixed-up life. It was the first public telling of her now-famous yarn "My Big Fat Greek Wedding," which she continued to perform at HBO sessions as the months went by. A year after that premiere, Vardalos registered a screenplay bearing the same theme and title with the Writers Guild of America.
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