Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWorld
IN THE NEWS

World

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 29, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
As we slip into October, I decided to assemble my first-ever Fantasy Halloween League of the Top 13 haunted mazes at theme parks around the world. Think of the Top 13 list as a nightmare fantastic park with the most demented, disturbing and disgusting collection of haunted attractions ever gathered in one virtual place. Or my definition of a dream vacation if I had a bottomless budget and unlimited vacation time to jet around the world to the best and most bizarre haunts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
The U.S. has played in nine World Cups, winning seven games, or the same number that Brazil won in 2002 alone, when it rolled to a record fifth title. But if the U.S. has struggled collectively on soccer's biggest stage, several players have stood out individually since Massachusetts' Bert Patenaude scored the first hat trick in tournament history in 1930. Here's one person's pick for the all-time U.S. World Cup team: Goalkeeper Brad Friedel (1994-2002): Only Tony Meola, with seven, has started more games in goal than Friedel.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2009
'The Real World' Where: MTV When: 10 tonight Price: TV-14 (may be unsuitable for children younger than 14)
SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
Like most kids growing up in Brazil, Roberto Gurgel dreamed of being on the field for a World Cup. That never happened. So this summer, Gurgel is settling for the next-best thing by helping to build five of the fields that will be used for the first World Cup in his native country in 64 years. Gurgel is executive director of research for Sod Solutions, a South Carolina-based company that develops and licenses varieties of grass. One of those varieties, a deep blue-green Bermuda called Celebration, will be used in five of the 12 World Cup venues this summer.
FOOD
April 26, 2014 | Noelle Carter
Rabbits "are helping win the war," proclaimed a Los Angeles Times article from 1943. Touted as a patriotic food during World War II, rabbits were raised by thousands of Americans in their backyards. Along with victory gardens, rabbits helped put food on the table when much of the nation's supply was shipped to soldiers overseas and ration stamps provided less at home. But even though rabbit consumption spiked during the war, it all but disappeared afterward. Think rabbit today and your thoughts probably veer to cartoon characters, cereal mascots, Easter and adorable pets.
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Vincent Bevins
Between a cluster of bars in this small coastal town, middle-aged European men hover around dozens of fresh-faced Brazilian women in tight dresses. Around the corner, two girls who look to be in their teens flag down cars, signaling their availability to potential clients. Most such activity, however, seems confined to a small, seedy tourist strip, the last gasp of a bygone era. Natal, long known as a hot spot for sex tourism, has seen fewer problems in the wake of a national economic boom and concerted government efforts to cut back on the Carnaval nation's carnal image.
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Olga Grigoryants, guest blogger
After pro-Russia forces entered Crimea this year, many of my American friends were aghast and worried that the situation might escalate. But in Russia, where I grew up, it's an alternate universe.  My friends and family are outraged at those who oppose the intrusion. Instead of being appalled by the violence threatening Ukraine's sovereignty, they are irate about Western critiques of President Vladimir Putin and his policies. Every time I post something supporting Ukraine on Facebook, such as a recent article about members of pro-Russia forces attacking opposition leaders in Crimea, my Russian friends lash out, calling me brainwashed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
A decade ago, as a foreign correspondent traveling through South America, I witnessed cellphone technology's march across the globe-- to a remote corner of the Peruvian Amazon, where even tricycle taxi drivers had them.   Now smartphone technology is completing its own conquest of the developing world. Handheld devices that allow you to browse the Web, or read a book, are now ubiquitous in South America, sub-Saharan Africa and the Indian subcontinent. This week, UNESCO reports on an unexpected consequence of the smartphone revolution: People with limited access to books are reading more, thanks to those tiny, portable screens.
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
If you want to make like a local when you travel this summer, choose your reading material carefully. Travelers visiting Sweden should pick up a copy of "2001: A Space Odyssey" by Arthur C. Clarke. Those who are Brazil-bound might reach for the heal th guide " Superfoods " by Meryl Joseph. That's the word on reading picks and habits from users of Scribd , the Netflix -like book lending company that compiled pages read, reading time and geographic data from users worldwide to create a kind of reading map of the world.  In the U.S., the must-read book on Scribd is "Sh*t My Dad Says," by Justin Halpern . Other top books, by country, include: --Denmark: "The Alchemist," by Paulo Coelho --Croatia: "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich," by William L. Shirer --Italy: "Beethoven Sonatas and the Creative Experience," by Kenneth O. Drake --The Netherlands: "The One-Minute Organizer," by Donna Smallin The fastest readers appear to be in Germany, followed by the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and Malaysia.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
It's a Small World, the 50-year-old Disneyland attraction with the singing automatonic children, is reportedly being turned into a movie. Deadline.com reported that Jon Turteltaub has been hired by Walt Disney Studios to direct the movie based on the attraction, with writer Jared Stern on board to write the script. Turteltaub has worked with Disney before, directing the two "National Treasure" films staring Nicolas Cage, and "The Kid" starring Bruce Willis. Most recently, he directed "Last Vegas" with Robert De Niro, Michael Douglas and Morgan Freeman.
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Mary Forgione
Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts will use a private branded jet to take travelers around the world on bespoke tours starting next year, the chain announced Wednesday. The Four Seasons Jet is a Boeing 757 that has been adapted with leather flatbed seats, Wi-Fi and its own "globally inspired cuisine. " And, of course, Four Seasons service. For example, passengers will have access to an on-board concierge to book extras such as spa time or golf dates while traveling to their destination.
OPINION
April 23, 2014 | By Jaak Treiman, Juris Bunkis and Daiva Navarrette
After Russia's recent actions in Ukraine, it's no surprise that other countries bordering Russia are wondering where they stand on Vladimir Putin's shopping list. That they are on the list is a given. Article 61 of Russia's Constitution promises that "the Russian Federation shall guarantee its citizens defense and patronage beyond its boundaries. " In other words, Russia shall protect any Russian citizen who is mistreated while outside Russia. On its face, Article 61 may seem reasonable.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|