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October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 12, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Reading is such an improbable idea -- a miracle, really. Yet simple squiggles on a page, arranged just so, can convey ideas that change the way we think or introduce to us characters we love for a lifetime. In celebration of reading -- and of this weekend's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books -- we asked four readers (who also happen to be writers) to celebrate books that mattered in their lives. The book was called "The Royal Road to Romance," and to a pre-adolescent boy with a fear of anything girlish, it sounded an awful lot like a bodice-ripper.
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NEWS
April 18, 2013
Here is a transcript of the remarks delivered by President Obama during an interfaith memorial service for those injured and killed by the Boston Marathon attack Monday, as provided by the White House: Hello, Boston! Scripture tells us to “run with endurance the race that is set before us.” Run with endurance the race that is set before us. On Monday morning, the sun rose over Boston. The sunlight glistened off the Statehouse dome. In the Common and the Public Garden, spring was in bloom.
SPORTS
April 12, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
- On a night when the toll of a lengthy boxing career was going to be tested in another multimillion-dollar world-title fight, the promise of a limitless future in the sport was also displayed. Oscar Valdez, a 23-year-old two-time Olympian from Nogales, Mexico, who trains in Santa Fe Springs, won his first belt, the North American Boxing Federation super-featherweight title, with a fourth-round knockout of Florida's Adrian Perez, 33, on Saturday. "Everything we practiced in the gym we showed in the ring today," Valdez (10-0, 10 knockouts)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2009
'The Real World' Where: MTV When: 10 tonight Price: TV-14 (may be unsuitable for children younger than 14)
SPORTS
April 12, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
AUGUSTA, Ga. - The man with the most continually shouted first name in golf will begin the final round of the Masters on Sunday in a final pairing with the most frightening of competitors. A 20-year-old kid who refuses to call him by his first name. Jordan Spieth respectfully refers to all of his elders as "Mister," which will make him the only person at Augusta National not referring to his co-leader as "Bubba. " "Yeah, 'Mr. Watson,' for sure," Spieth said, pausing, smiling.
OPINION
April 10, 2014 | By Stefan Halper and Lezlee Brown Halper
Beijing has no shortage of issues to confront. There's the South China Sea, uncontrollable corruption, a slowing economy and factional disputes within the party and military. But Chinese officials also face one of the most difficult challenges in modern statecraft: how to conquer a myth. Despite China's attempts to dislodge its mythic appeal, Tibet as Shangri-La seems firmly set in the world's imagination. The once-independent nation, set high on a broad plateau adjacent to the Himalayas, is a worldwide symbol of mystery, aspiration, spirituality and possibility.
WORLD
April 9, 2014 | By Paul Richter and Ramin Mostaghim
WASHINGTON - Negotiators for Iran and six world powers said Wednesday that they have completed preliminary discussions on Iran's disputed nuclear program and are dashing to finish a long-term comprehensive agreement by July 20. Wrapping up two days of talks in Vienna, the negotiators said they would meet next month to draft a final deal in hope of reaching an accord before the midsummer deadline. The results are hardly assured because the process will entail difficult decisions on a number of contentious issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - The guided-missile frigate Vandegrift returned here Wednesday with 15 officers, 190 enlisted sailors and a sick baby named Lyra. The rescue of the 1-year-old and her family from their crippled sailboat hundreds of miles out at sea was accomplished by a joint effort of the Coast Guard, California Air National Guard and the Navy, which redirected the Vandegrift from a training mission off Southern California. Avoiding the news media, Eric and Charlotte Kaufman and their two daughters - Lyra and 3-year-old Cora - disembarked at Naval Air Station North Island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014
Arthur Napoleon Raymond Robinson Former Trinidad and Tobago leader held by Islamic rebels Arthur Napoleon Raymond Robinson, 87, a former Trinidad and Tobago prime minister who was held hostage for days and shot during a bloody 1990 coup attempt, died Wednesday at a private medical center in Trinidad's capital of Port-of-Spain after a prolonged illness. National Security Minister Gary Griffith said Robinson had been hospitalized for several medical conditions related to diabetes.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - Jonathan Fleming had videos of his Disney World holiday. He had a receipt from his hotel, where employees remembered him for running up a high phone bill. But the perfect alibi couldn't save Fleming from serving nearly 25 years in prison for a murder he didn't commit - a murder that took place in Brooklyn, N.Y., more than 900 miles from the Florida resort. On Tuesday, Fleming, 51, walked free after the Brooklyn district attorney, Kenneth P. Thompson, dismissed the case after an examination by his office's Conviction Review Unit.
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The lives of captive killer whales are nothing like those of their wild counterparts. Instead of roaming for miles every day in close-knit family groups, captive whales perform for audiences in tanks that, though roomier than those of early marine parks, are far too small for such large ocean predators. In the wild, killer whales have not been known to kill humans or one another. The same cannot be said for the whales in amusement parks around the world, even though they represent only about a tenth of a percent of the numbers in the wild.
SPORTS
April 7, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
Somewhere, lost in the sleaze that all so often defines what college basketball has become, are the overlooked culprits. Mom and Dad. We in the media rant on and on about AAU coaches and summer leagues and slimeball agents (is that redundant?). We harp on coaches who cheat to get the blue-chip player and college administrators who look the other way. We make fun of the NCAA because it is so big and pompous and obtuse and full of itself and makes so much money off the pimpled backs of teenagers.
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