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WORLD
September 28, 2008 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
With $3 billion in new pledges, world leaders say they believe that an ambitious goal to stop deaths from malaria by 2015 is finally within reach. A plan billed as the most comprehensive ever to tackle the mosquito-borne disease, which kills nearly 1 million people each year, was unveiled last week at a United Nations gathering of heads of government, global health leaders and philanthropists.
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SCIENCE
July 30, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The number of AIDS deaths worldwide dropped 10% in 2007 because of increasing access to treatment, as did the number of new infections in children, the United Nations reported Tuesday. Condom use and prevention efforts increased in many countries and adolescent sexual intercourse declined in some of the most heavily affected regions, the report says. "In a surprisingly short period of time, there has been a tripling of prevention efforts in some countries," said Dr.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The House voted to triple money to fight AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis around the world, giving new life to a program credited with saving or prolonging millions of lives in Africa alone. The 303-115 vote sends the global AIDS bill to President Bush, who supports the five-year, $48-billion plan.
SCIENCE
June 3, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 3 million people in developing countries are now receiving antiretroviral drugs to treat AIDS, a treatment goal that health authorities had hoped to meet two years ago, according to a new report released Monday. About 1 million people received the life-saving drugs for the first time during 2007, according to the report from UNAIDS, the World Health Organization and UNICEF. During the same period, however, an additional 2.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2008 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
The spread of syphilis across the globe was probably sparked by Christopher Columbus and his crew, who ferried the bacterium, or a version of it, from the New World to the Old World, according to a new genetic analysis published Monday. A comparison of 23 strains of Treponema pallidum bacterium found that the modern variety that causes the sexually transmitted disease was most closely related to bacteria collected from a remote tribe in Guyana.
SCIENCE
December 29, 2007 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
An unusual virus known as chikungunya sickened at least 200 people and contributed to the death of a man in northeastern Italy this year, marking the first time the tropical virus has caused a disease outbreak in a temperate climate, researchers reported this month.
NATIONAL
December 1, 2007 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush urged Congress on Friday to renew his program to fund anti-AIDS efforts around the world and said he would visit sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease is the leading cause of death, early next year. As the White House displayed a 28-foot red ribbon at the front door to mark World AIDS Day, which is being commemorated today, Bush visited a small church that last summer sent a team of volunteers to Namibia to care for AIDS orphans.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2007 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
Afghan President Hamid Karzai and Archbishop Desmond Tutu were having a diplomatic face-off during a panel discussion on, basically, how to save the world from itself, the meta-theme of the Clinton Global Initiative. You go first, Tutu motioned to Karzai. No, motioned Karzai, you go first. "Quit being deferential," Clinton snapped in faux frustration. "You're wasting time."
SCIENCE
September 13, 2007 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
Worldwide deaths for children younger than 5 dropped to an estimated 9.7 million last year, the lowest level since record-keeping began in 1960, the United Nations Children's Fund announced Wednesday. Even as the world population has grown, the number of early childhood deaths has shrunk to less than half its modern peak in 1960, the agency found. At that time, an estimated 20 million children died before reaching their fifth birthday.
WORLD
August 23, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Tens of thousands of women forced to work as sex slaves in Asia are deeply vulnerable to contracting HIV and spreading the deadly virus across the continent, according to a U.N. report released Wednesday. If nothing is done to stop human trafficking in the region, "there is just going to be an explosion" of infections, said Caitlin Wiesen of the United Nations Development Program. The report, "Human Trafficking and HIV," was released at a conference here on HIV in Asia and the Pacific.
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