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BUSINESS
June 7, 1994 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
'Civilization' on CD: World Library Inc. in Irvine launched the new multimedia version of Will and Ariel Durant's "The Story of Civilization" on Monday at a reception at the Los Angeles Public Library. World Library reproduced the classic book on a CD-ROM--a type of computer disk that stores sound, text, video and graphics--using previously unreleased footage of the Durants.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1994 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
'Civilization' on CD: World Library Inc. in Irvine launched the new multimedia version of Will and Ariel Durant's "The Story of Civilization" on Monday at a reception at the Los Angeles Public Library. World Library reproduced the classic book on a CD-ROM--a type of computer disk that stores sound, text, video and graphics--using previously unreleased footage of the Durants.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI
Frustration was the catalyst that drove two Garden Grove brothers to start World Library Inc., which publishes literary works on CD-ROM. After searching reference books for three days to find an obscure quotation from 18th-Century German philosopher Immanuel Kant, Robert Hustwit came up with the idea of poring over great literature electronically. He and his brother, William, launched their company in 1989 and published the first edition of "Library of the Future" in June, 1990.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few years ago, Robert Hustwit had the unpleasant task of scanning eight volumes of arcane text by 18th-Century German philosopher Immanuel Kant in search of a single quotation for a philosophy-research project. The search took days. And when he was finished, the bleary-eyed Hustwit mused to himself that there ought to be a faster way.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1994 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
There was no thunder and lightning during my first encounter with an electronic book. I must admit I was a bit disappointed. I sat in front of my home computer reading the beginning of 19th-Century German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche's "Thus Spake Zarathustra," one of the 3,500 works of literature stored on a single computer compact disk. It's difficult to grasp that they crammed so much information from so many books onto a shiny 5-inch platter.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | Dean Takahashi
BEYOND VIDEO: The multimedia industry--which produces computer programs for products like games that combine video, sound, graphics and text--gathers steam in Orange County. A decade ago, there were just a few one-person firms; now there are more than a dozen companies with hundreds of employees. . . . Enter Jon Sidoli, a UC Irvine fine arts graduate, who started Digital Artists Agency in Irvine to supply multimedia companies with performers. "We're the talent scouts," Sidoli says.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI
Frustration was the catalyst that drove two Garden Grove brothers to start World Library Inc., which publishes literary works on CD-ROM. After searching reference books for three days to find an obscure quotation from 18th-Century German philosopher Immanuel Kant, Robert Hustwit came up with the idea of poring over great literature electronically. He and his brother, William, launched their company in 1989 and published the first edition of "Library of the Future" in June, 1990.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few years ago, Robert Hustwit had the unpleasant task of scanning eight volumes of arcane text by 18th-Century German philosopher Immanuel Kant in search of a single quotation for a philosophy-research project. The search took days. And when he was finished, the bleary-eyed Hustwit mused to himself that there ought to be a faster way.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI
David Mann turned his passion for reading and his love of computers into a business. In 1991, he co-founded SoftBooks Inc., a Lake Forest company that makes electronic books. "I always wanted to be a publisher," said Mann, 36, president of the company. "I read about a book a week. I decided to combine my technical and literature interests."
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