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February 24, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
Outside of the Lakers, Jerry Buss had another great love: playing poker. So the World Poker Tour put together a video to honor the Lakers owner, who died last week, and on Saturday, the WPT paid tribute to Buss at the Commerce Casino in Los Angeles, at the commencement of the L.A. Poker Classic. Buss took second place in the WPT Celebrity Invitational in 2003.  He came in third in the 1991 World Series of Poker seven-card stud event. "I don't know whether poker prepared me for the Lakers or if the Lakers prepared me for poker -- maybe a little bit at the same time," Buss said in 2003.
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SPORTS
August 26, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
The Los Angeles Lakers Youth Foundation received $7,825 from the Mariani/Buss Celebrity Charity Event, presented by WPT Foundation -- held on Sunday at the Bicycle Casino. "We're here to raise money for the kids of the inner city," said Anthony Mariani, development director of the foundation. "Every dollar that we make goes straight to the community. " The tournament was held in honor of the late Jerry Buss, who passed away in February from cancer complications. "All of us kids played cards with my dad," said daughter Janie Drexel. "I know that his passion for poker was right up there with basketball.
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BUSINESS
July 12, 2005 | From Reuters
Gaming entertainment company WPT Enterprises Inc. said Monday that it was willing to let a $700-million takeover offer expire today if it was still unable to get key information from the bidding group led by U.S. poker champion Doyle Brunson. "At this point, without any further information, we would let it expire," WPT Chief Executive Steven Lipscomb said.
SPORTS
August 18, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
Although basketball was Jerry Buss' true love, the late Lakers owner was also a passionate poker player. On Aug. 25 at 4 p.m., the World Poker Tour Foundation will hold the Frank Mariani & Jerry Buss No Limit Hold 'em Poker Tournament at the Bicycle Casino  in Bell Gardens. The guaranteed prize for the tournament is $20,000. The entry fee is a $365 buy-in, with 25% of the tournament's prize pool donated to the Los Angeles Lakers Youth Foundation , which focuses "on the use of sports to promote education, teamwork and self-esteem among Los Angeles area youth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2006 | Tanya Caldwell, Times Staff Writer
Seven of the world's best poker players have pulled their chips together to fight the World Poker Tour. And they're not bluffing.
SPORTS
June 2, 2003 | Larry Stewart
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, heard, observed, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. One exception: No products will be endorsed. What: "World Poker Tour" Where: The Travel Channel, Wednesdays, 9 p.m. If you want to see competitors sweat and witness their raw emotions, the World Poker Tour delivers. What makes the shows intriguing for TV viewers is the technology that allows them to see the hole cards.
NEWS
February 5, 2004 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
On a recent weekday afternoon in Bel-Air, Phil Hellmuth cozied up to a green felt card table piled with $18,000 in $100 bills. Hellmuth, the 1989 World Series of Poker champion, was shooting an infomercial for his "million dollar" poker system video, which promises to teach the ordinary chump to play like a champion. If anyone has an inside track on poker, it's Hellmuth, the winner of $3.5 million in tournament play, and the author of last year's book "Play Poker Like the Pros" (HarperCollins).
SPORTS
November 27, 2003 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Poker seems to be holding a hot hand these days. Fox Sports Net has chosen poker as counter-programming to Thanksgiving Day football on television today. Beginning at 12:30, the cable network offers six consecutive one-hour shows covering the three-day "Showdown at the Sands" tournament in Atlantic City, N.J., which ended Monday. NBC has chosen a poker tournament -- the World Poker Tour's "Battle of Champions" -- to televise from 1-3 p.m. opposite CBS' Super Bowl pregame coverage on Feb. 1.
SPORTS
February 25, 2003 | T.J. Simers
It's not going to be easy, as I understand it, to win $1.5 million. I've been told I might have to match wits today with Kato Kaelin, or make small talk with Meatloaf.
SPORTS
August 26, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
The Los Angeles Lakers Youth Foundation received $7,825 from the Mariani/Buss Celebrity Charity Event, presented by WPT Foundation -- held on Sunday at the Bicycle Casino. "We're here to raise money for the kids of the inner city," said Anthony Mariani, development director of the foundation. "Every dollar that we make goes straight to the community. " The tournament was held in honor of the late Jerry Buss, who passed away in February from cancer complications. "All of us kids played cards with my dad," said daughter Janie Drexel. "I know that his passion for poker was right up there with basketball.
SPORTS
February 24, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
Outside of the Lakers, Jerry Buss had another great love: playing poker. So the World Poker Tour put together a video to honor the Lakers owner, who died last week, and on Saturday, the WPT paid tribute to Buss at the Commerce Casino in Los Angeles, at the commencement of the L.A. Poker Classic. Buss took second place in the WPT Celebrity Invitational in 2003.  He came in third in the 1991 World Series of Poker seven-card stud event. "I don't know whether poker prepared me for the Lakers or if the Lakers prepared me for poker -- maybe a little bit at the same time," Buss said in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2010 | Steve Rosenbloom
Many pros express frustration that their raises don't always get a lot of respect because amateurs want to beat them in a pot or go home with a story if they lose to the name player. To counter that, a lot of pros will take some shots with surprising hands that can both take down a big pot and send a message to the table, as top pro Michael Mizrachi did in this hand from the 2010 World Series of Poker $10,000-buy-in main event. With blinds at $100-$200, the player in Seat 5 limped.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Steve Rosenbloom, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Getting value for your hand is about determining the best way to induce a mistake from your opponent. Against a calling station, you'd likely bet with the expectation that he'd call with a worse hand. Against an aggressive player, you'd consider playing passively in hopes he might bluff at the pot, as young pro Mike Sowers demonstrated in this hand from the World Poker Tour's $15,000-buy-in Doyle Brunson Five Diamond World Poker Classic at Las Vegas' Bellagio in 2009. With blinds at $400-$800 plus a $75 ante, Sowers open-raised to $2,000 from the hijack seat with Q-10 offsuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Steve Rosenbloom, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sometimes you have all the elements you need to pull off a bluff, but then your opponent spoils it by making a call. It's not a total loss, however, if you can turn a misread into some information useful later on, as top young pro Eric Baldwin found in this hand from the World Poker Tour's $15,000-buy-in Doyle Brunson Five Diamond World Poker Classic at Las Vegas' Bellagio in 2009. With blinds at $100-$200 plus a $25-chip ante, Baldwin raised to $575 from middle position with 6-4 offsuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2010 | By Steve Rosenbloom
Whether you are trying to extract value or run an opponent off a hand, betting on the river is not just a matter of reading your opponent's betting pattern but also your own. You'll be losing chips if you don't realize when your opponent is giving you credit for a bigger hand than you actually hold and would fold to a bet. In this hand from the World Poker Tour's $15,000-buy-in Doyle Brunson World Poker Classic at Las Vegas' Bellagio in 2008, with...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Steve Rosenbloom
One of the biggest advantages the top pros hold over lesser players -- amateurs, especially -- is the ability to play after the flop. Each street brings more cards and more betting rounds. Pot odds change. So does the context of the board. The longer a hand goes, the better the chance the experienced player can further define the range of hands an opponent is likely to be holding. It's all about gathering information. Sometimes, however, all the information you need presents itself in the pre-flop betting, as poker legend Johnny Chan deduced in this hand from the World Poker Tour's $15,000-buy-in Doyle Brunson Five Diamond World Poker Classic at Las Vegas' Bellagio in 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2009 | By Steve Rosenbloom
The seemingly endless amount of poker content available today, from books to magazines to video training, provides players with a variety of strategies that can educate like never before. But for all the advances in poker thinking, there is one old-time concept that remains unchanged: You need a lot of heart to become great. You need the courage to run a bluff, and you need a similar type of heart to make the hero call -- a quality that championship pro David Benyamine displayed in today's hand from the World Poker Tour's $15,000-buy-in Doyle Brunson Five Diamond World Poker Classic at Las Vegas' Bellagio in 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Steve Rosenbloom
One of the biggest advantages the top pros hold over lesser players -- amateurs, especially -- is the ability to play after the flop. Each street brings more cards and more betting rounds. Pot odds change. So does the context of the board. The longer a hand goes, the better the chance the experienced player can further define the range of hands an opponent is likely to be holding. It's all about gathering information. Sometimes, however, all the information you need presents itself in the pre-flop betting, as poker legend Johnny Chan deduced in this hand from the World Poker Tour's $15,000-buy-in Doyle Brunson Five Diamond World Poker Classic at Las Vegas' Bellagio in 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2009 | By Steve Rosenbloom
The seemingly endless amount of poker content available today, from books to magazines to video training, provides players with a variety of strategies that can educate like never before. But for all the advances in poker thinking, there is one old-time concept that remains unchanged: You need a lot of heart to become great. You need the courage to run a bluff, and you need a similar type of heart to make the hero call -- a quality that championship pro David Benyamine displayed in today's hand from the World Poker Tour's $15,000-buy-in Doyle Brunson Five Diamond World Poker Classic at Las Vegas' Bellagio in 2009.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2006 | Tanya Caldwell, Times Staff Writer
Seven of the world's best poker players have pulled their chips together to fight the World Poker Tour. And they're not bluffing.
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