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World Population

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1998
Melvin D. Thomas' concept of reducing the world population from the current 5 billion to 50 million to improve the environment of those remaining provides interesting food for thought (letter, May 4). One problem. It may be difficult to get volunteers to be among the 4.95 billion souls "reduced" in order to arrive at this condition of heaven upon Earth. JERRY SULLIVAN Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
The global incidence of girls under 18 giving birth has declined steadily for decades, but with 7.3 million children born to teenage mothers each year, the costs to their health and society remain staggering, according to a U.N. population study released Wednesday. In the State of World Population 2013 , the world body observes that 95% of the teens giving birth each year live in the developing world, where access to birth control and protections against early marriage and sexual violence are weakest.
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WORLD
October 31, 2011 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
It took only a dozen years for humanity to add another billion people to the planet, reaching the milestone of 7 billion Monday — give or take a few months. Demographers at the United Nations Population Division set Oct. 31, 2011, as the "symbolic" date for hitting 7 billion, while acknowledging that it's impossible to know for sure the specific time or day. Using slightly different calculations, the U.S. Census Bureau estimates the 7-billion threshold will not be reached until March.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | Bt Gary Goldstein
"More Than Honey" is an extraordinarily shot but meandering survey of the world's bee population: how they work (and boy, do they ever), why they're critical to the survival of many ecosystems, and the possible reasons they've been dwindling in alarming numbers. Producer-director Markus Imhoof tackles a hugely vital subject, but the film's loose structure and lack of a specific through-line don't make for the clearest intake of its, well, swarm of information. The Swiss-born Imhoof, whose canner grandfather's fruit gardens and orchards were sustained by honeybees (and whose daughter and son-in-law, seen here, are bee researchers)
NEWS
October 12, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The world population is expected to grow from 6 billion to about 10 billion by 2080, but the human race is still expected to have enough to eat, an Australian demographer said in Beijing. "But there may be more subtle things about the environment, about the atmosphere that would be much more difficult to control," said John Caldwell, president of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1997
The League of Women Voters is hosting a question-and-answer discussion of the world population Saturday at Marie Callender's Restaurant. Susie Morale, who is a member of the Population Coalition, the Environmental Action Committee and the Peace Corps Assn., will speak about issues ranging from human rights to orphaned children. "We will be discussing the problems of food supply and sustaining the systems it takes to make population viable," said Dorothy Baird, who helped organize the event.
NEWS
December 29, 1996 | Reuters
World population is growing more slowly than in recent years and with a concerted effort to defuse a "demographic time bomb" population could stabilize at 8 billion by 2025, an advocacy group said Friday. Werner Fornos, president of the Washington-based institute, said the world's population is growing by almost 90 million annually, more slowly than the 100 million growth of recent years. The world's population is nearing 5.9 billion, and will be over 6 billion by the year 2000.
NEWS
April 14, 1987 | Associated Press
The rate at which people are being born is speeding up again, just as the planet's population edges past the 5-billion milestone, a population study group reported Monday. The private Population Reference Bureau cited an easing of strict birth limits in China as a prime reason for the turnaround in population growth. The Bureau's new World Population Data Sheet for 1987 estimates that the July 1 population of the world will be 5.026 billion.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
World population will almost double, to 10 billion, by the year 2050, with almost all of the faster-than-expected growth taking place in poor, developing countries, the U.N. Population Fund said Monday in its annual report. The soaring population growth is expected despite birthrate declines in all major regions of the world--and even though the percentage of married couples using contraceptives in developing countries has grown from less than 10% in the 1960s to 51%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2013 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
Nearly two-thirds of American voters believe that human population growth is driving other animal species to extinction and that if the situation gets worse, society has a "moral responsibility to address the problem," according to new national public opinion poll. A slightly lower percentage of those polled - 59% - believes that population growth is an important environmental issue and 54% believe that stabilizing the population will help protect the environment. The survey was conducted on behalf of the nonprofit Center for Biological Diversity, which unlike other environmental groups has targeted population growth as part of its campaign to save wildlife species from extinction.
OPINION
December 6, 2012
Re "Bending the population curve," Opinion, Dec. 2 The world doesn't want to consider abortion as a method of family planning, but women worldwide do to the tune of about 40 million a year. Half of these are illegal and unsafe, resulting in millions of injuries and deaths, according to the Guttmacher Institute. Universal access to contraception would certainly reduce population pressures, but thanks to gender inequality and religion, women often don't have safe access to abortion and contraception.
OPINION
July 31, 2012
Re "A church's choice," last of five parts, July 29 The horror created by Roman Catholic clerics in the Philippines begs for a new reformation by more thoughtful followers of the faith. The bishops pretend to promote a "culture of life" by pressuring politicians to halt the distribution of contraceptives; in fact, they promote a culture of death with more starving children. Wrongly conflating contraception with abortion leads to more actual abortions. Human beings might be able to adapt to the global changes taking place; however, they could starve the planet's life if the science that offers a way to prevent unwanted pregnancies is ignored.
WORLD
July 26, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
DADAAB, Kenya - His rib cage rose and fell with tight, rapid breaths. Saad Siyat looked shrunken beneath the hospital blanket. His wide-set eyes rolled up into his head, and his body burned with fever. The boy was unconscious and convulsing when his aunt brought him to the hospital at Ifo camp, one of five massive camps in eastern Kenya filled with Somali refugees. The family had arrived months earlier after a nearly 300-mile journey across the desert. Saad was suffering from pneumonia and chronic undernourishment - in particular, a protein deficiency known as kwashiorkor.
WORLD
October 31, 2011 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
It took only a dozen years for humanity to add another billion people to the planet, reaching the milestone of 7 billion Monday — give or take a few months. Demographers at the United Nations Population Division set Oct. 31, 2011, as the "symbolic" date for hitting 7 billion, while acknowledging that it's impossible to know for sure the specific time or day. Using slightly different calculations, the U.S. Census Bureau estimates the 7-billion threshold will not be reached until March.
OPINION
October 30, 2011 | By David Lam
The United Nations has identified Monday as the day world population hits 7 billion. Many find the Halloween date appropriate given the frightening prospect of this demographic milestone. As if 7 billion weren't scary enough, the U.N. projects 10 billion people by 2083, the addition of roughly three more Indias. But the parents of the 7-billionth person should not be afraid for their child's future. In spite of the daunting challenges facing the world, including global warming, rising food prices and a billion people in poverty, the 7-billionth child will almost surely have a better life than the 3-billionth or 6-billionth child.
OPINION
May 15, 2011
It's getting crowded out there. According to an updated report from the United Nations, the planet's population is not following the expected curve: topping out at about 9 billion mid-century and then leveling off. Instead, the demographic trends point to continued growth, bringing the worldwide population to 10.1 billion by the end of the century - nearly a 50% increase for a planet now inhabited by just under 7 billion. The highest rates of growth will be concentrated in poverty-stricken countries with low education levels, especially those in Africa, where the population is expected to more than triple to 3.5 billion.
WORLD
April 1, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
India's population is now more than 1.2 billion, an increase of 181 million in a decade, putting it on course to surpass China as the world's most populous nation sometime after 2030, according to preliminary census results released Thursday. Though India's population growth rate slowed significantly to 17.6% over the last decade, putting it on target to double in size in about 50 years, the nation added almost enough people to match the biggest country in South America. "We have added almost one Brazil to our population in the last one decade," C. Chandramouli, India's census commissioner, told reporters Thursday.
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