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World Population

NEWS
August 6, 1987 | From Reuters
Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar has been presented with a "population clock" that keeps track of the population growth of the world and of 157 countries, updated each minute. The clock was the idea of the U.N. Fund for Population Activities as part of its "World of Five Billion" information campaign aimed at making world leaders aware of population problems.
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NEWS
April 30, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raising the specter of relentless migration pressures in the next century, the U.N. Population Fund reported Wednesday that an estimated 70 million people now work legally or illegally in countries other than those in which they were born, their numbers augmented every year by about 2 million more immigrants and refugees. During the late 1980s, the U.N.
OPINION
June 28, 2008
Re "The price of hunger," editorial, June 23 So The Times believes that $30 billion a year will fix the world's hunger problems. By raising the starving into the level of not quite starving, we actually ensure a new, larger generation of starving. Populations without constraint grow exponentially. The world population is now at least three times the sustainable level. Compassion compels us to minimize death rates, but wisdom directs us to reduce birthrates. This is not only the proper approach to the food crisis but to the water shortage, global warming and fossil fuel and mineral resource exhaustion.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | From Reuters
At U.N. headquarters, a population clock heralded the world's 6 billionth human among the 370,000 babies born Tuesday, many of them destined for a future of poverty and illiteracy. "As we mark this day, the central question we face is not simply how many people will live on this planet but how they will live," President Clinton said in Washington. In Bosnia-Herzegovina, U.N.
NEWS
October 10, 1999 | MATT CRENSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A majority of the 370,000 children born this Tuesday will be poor. Half will be Asian. And in theory, one will be the planet's 6 billionth person. Most experts greet this milestone with anxiety. In just 12 years, they note, humans have increased their number by 1 billion. During the 20th century, the world's population has tripled. And by 2100, ecologist David Pimentel of Cornell University warned in a recent paper, "12 billion miserable humans will suffer a difficult life on Earth."
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | BEVERLY BEYETTE
OK, baby Nevic, you win. We concede you the title of 6 billionth human on Earth, even though there's something a bit cloying and self-serving about this stunt pulled by the United Nations. So U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan just happened to be in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Tuesday when your mother, Fatima, gave birth at a Sarajevo hospital. And you just happened to arrive at 12:02 a.m., Sarajevo time, on the very day (Oct. 12) the U.N.
NEWS
July 11, 1987 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
Because of better food distribution and improved health care, the world's population has reached 5 billion--more than triple the level at the turn of the 19th Century--and is likely to grow by another billion by the end of this century, the Population Crisis Committee reported today.
OPINION
April 17, 1994
At the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, leaders from many nations met to develop joint strategies to save the world's threatened natural resources. That high-profile U.N. conference proved to be an international embarrassment to the U.S. delegation; then-President George Bush, one of the conference participants, refused to sign the biodiversity treaty agreed to by more than 100 other nations. The United States now has a chance to redeem itself in the eyes of the world community: at the U.N.
NEWS
November 8, 2001 | From Associated Press
The world's population could skyrocket to 10.9 billion people by 2050 unless women gain better access to education and health care, a United Nations report said Wednesday. Women must receive adequate reproductive health care and have equal status with men and the right to plan the size of their families if the planet is to rein in a population already expected to grow by 50% to 9.3 billion over the next half a century, the U.N. Population Fund said.
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