Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWorld War I
IN THE NEWS

World War I

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
March 26, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
BRUSSELS -- President Obama laid a wreath at the World War I memorial at Flanders Field on Wednesday, noting the war that tore apart Europe still echoes in conflicts 100 years later. "The lessons of that war speak to us still," Obama said in his first stop since arriving in Belgium late Tuesday. The president is in Brussels for a summit with European Union leaders. He's also slated to meet with NATO's secretary-general and deliver a speech at the Palais des Beaux-Arts. The itinerary, like much of Obama's European trip this week, is expected to be dominated by talk of a new threat on Europe's doorstep.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 26, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
BRUSSELS -- President Obama laid a wreath at the World War I memorial at Flanders Field on Wednesday, noting the war that tore apart Europe still echoes in conflicts 100 years later. "The lessons of that war speak to us still," Obama said in his first stop since arriving in Belgium late Tuesday. The president is in Brussels for a summit with European Union leaders. He's also slated to meet with NATO's secretary-general and deliver a speech at the Palais des Beaux-Arts. The itinerary, like much of Obama's European trip this week, is expected to be dominated by talk of a new threat on Europe's doorstep.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
November 4, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
To commemorate the centennial of the beginning of World War I, Dolomite Mountains Ltd. will lead eight-day tours exploring the via ferrata , or iron path,  the network of lines and metal ladders built to aid soldiers as they fought in and around the steep Dolomite peaks of northern Italy. Beginning in Cortina d' Ampezzo, hikers will climb a different via ferrata each day as guides discuss the stories, ruins and remnants of the historic routes among the Dolomites. The hike ends in Alta Badia.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
History's next big miniseries will be titled "World Wars," and as the name suggests, it'll be looking at the 30-year span of time that saw World War I and World War II. History announced the project Wednesday and revealed that the six-part series will air on both History and H2, and be seen in 160 countries around the world, which is more countries than were involved in either of the world wars. The project, which was filmed in both the U.S. and Europe, will feature interviews with Gen. Colin Powell, former British Prime Minister John Major, former Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti and Sen. John McCain, among others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2011 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Frank Woodruff Buckles, a onetime Missouri farm boy who was the last known living American veteran of World War I, has died. He was 110. Buckles, who later spent more than three years in a Japanese internment camp in the Philippines during World War II, died Sunday of natural causes at his home in Charles Town, W.Va., family spokesman David DeJonge said. A total of 4,734,991 Americans served in the military during World War I, from 1914 to 1918. "I always knew I'd be one of the last because I was one of the youngest when I joined," Buckles told the New York Daily News in 2008, when he was 107. "But I never thought I'd be the last one. " Earning that distinction resulted in numerous honors for Buckles.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2006 | From the Associated Press
World War I ended nearly 90 years ago, only a few of its U.S. veterans are still alive and, about a decade ago, its national monument was closed after years of neglect and deterioration. But this weekend, the "war to end all wars" takes center stage when the National World War I Museum opens in Kansas City, Mo., giving the public a chance to learn about -- and from -- the conflict that catapulted the United States toward superpower status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2010 | Dennis McLellan
John "Jack" Babcock was a 15 1/2 -year-old Canadian farm boy when he joined the 146th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force in 1916 during World War I. "They were hard up for men then," he recalled in 2003 in the Ottawa Citizen. "They didn't have the draft yet" and relied on enlistees. Babcock, Canada's last known World War I veteran, died Thursday at 109 at his home in Spokane, Wash. "As a nation, we honour his service and mourn his passing," Prime Minister Stephen Harper said Thursday in a statement.
WORLD
November 10, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The remains of an unidentified New Zealand soldier arrived home to a stirring traditional welcome by Maori warriors, 88 years after his burial in France during World War I. The soldier, who died in the Battle of the Somme in northern France, is to become the nation's official Unknown Warrior after his burial Thursday at the National War Memorial in Wellington. The dedication will take place on Remembrance Day, Nov.
WORLD
July 2, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Church bells tolled across northern France to mark the 90th anniversary of the Battle of the Somme, one of history's worst blood baths. Britain led Allied forces into battle hoping to end 18 months of deadlock with a decisive victory over German forces. When the fighting ended Nov. 18, Britain had only advanced about six miles, and more than 1 million troops lay dead. Prince Charles called the World War I battle "a most profound shock" for Britain, and "an unutterable hell."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1998
Two World War I veterans will receive France's highest honor, the Legion of Honor, Wednesday at the French consul general's home in Beverly Hills. The two recipients are Albert Willard, 101, of Sherman Oaks and Fred Roberts, 102, of Temple City, said Yo-Jung Chen, vice consul at the French Consulate in Westwood. The men are being recognized for their service in France during World War I and to commemorate the 80th anniversary of the end of that war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Hundreds of students paraded into a gymnasium on Saturday afternoon at USC's Galen Center, their friends and families cheering from the bleachers as ragtime music played. The Super Quiz, the final event in the Los Angeles County Academic Decathlon, was about to start. The game show-style competition requires teams of nine high school students to answer three dozen multiple-choice questions on subjects including art, economics and science. Questions were read by Fox 11 news reporter Gigi Graciette, and students had just seven seconds to punch in their answers on hand-held electronic devices.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2013 | By Alice Short
There's no doubt that public education has neglected World War I, with history teachers squeezing in a few lectures before launching into succeeding conflicts. Literature has been kinder to the Great War, offering many opportunities to remedy that oversight. Shell shock alone has been the subject of scores of novels (most notably Pat Barker's "Regeneration" trilogy) that remind us how WWI inextricably altered the trajectory - and the mythology - of the heroic soldier. Now Anita Shreve, the bestselling author of "The Pilot's Wife" and "The Weight of Water," has joined the ranks of writers who want to plumb the depths of shell shock's despair and disruptions.
TRAVEL
November 4, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
To commemorate the centennial of the beginning of World War I, Dolomite Mountains Ltd. will lead eight-day tours exploring the via ferrata , or iron path,  the network of lines and metal ladders built to aid soldiers as they fought in and around the steep Dolomite peaks of northern Italy. Beginning in Cortina d' Ampezzo, hikers will climb a different via ferrata each day as guides discuss the stories, ruins and remnants of the historic routes among the Dolomites. The hike ends in Alta Badia.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
For Joe Sacco, the decision to do "The Great War" (W.W. Norton: boxed, unpaged, $35) grew out of a kind of dare. The idea - to create a panoramic drawing of the Western Front, and more specifically, the first day of the Battle of the Somme - had been a source of late-night conversation in the 1990s, when he'd shared a New York apartment with a young editor named Matt Weiland, who, like Sacco, was fascinated by the First World War. Fifteen years...
WORLD
September 9, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry on Monday kept up the Obama administration's push for international support of a military strike on Syria and reassured Britain that Washington had “no better partner” in the world despite the British government's decision not to participate in any armed reprisal against Damascus. With a cliffhanger vote to endorse a military strike looming in Congress, Kerry insisted that the United States was under “no illusions” about a military solution to the Syrian conflict, and that diplomacy was the only path to a resolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Thomas Keneally has always been a novelist who writes and lives in the big sweep of epic history. He took on the end of the First World War in "Gossip From the Forest," the U.S. Civil War in "Confederates," and the Eritrean War of Independence in "To Asmara. " He won the Booker Prize for "Schindler's List," his account of one good German saving lives during the Holocaust. In "The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith," he told a story of racism and violence set amid his native Australia's founding as an independent nation in 1901.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1998 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
Two World War I veterans, one of them from the Valley, will receive France's highest honor--the Legion of Honor medal--on Wednesday at the French consul general's home in Beverly Hills. Albert Willard, 101, of Sherman Oaks, and Fred Roberts, 102, of Temple City, will receive the National Order of the Legion of Honor medal, said Yo-Jung Chen, vice consul at the French Consulate in Westwood.
NATIONAL
May 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
America's largest World War I memorial, scrubbed clean and accompanied by a museum of war relics, reopened to fanfare and rededication speeches attended by representatives of Belgium, France, Italy, Britain and by the chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, Air Force Gen. Richard B. Myers. Then, as now, "they are with us there, side by side," Myers said to a cheering crowd of about 8,000. As the war receded into the history books, so did interest and care for the 217-foot Liberty Memorial.
NATIONAL
January 1, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - The fight for a national World War I memorial in the nation's capital will continue in the new year. Legislation sent by Congress to President Obama calls for creating a commission to plan for activities to commemorate the centennial of the Great War. A bill approved earlier by the House called for a national memorial in Washington but the provision was stripped out by the Senate. The final measure was approved by the House on Monday.    David DeJonge, president and co-founder of the  WWI Memorial Foundation, said he hopes that a national memorial in Washington will be considered in the next Congress.
WORLD
December 27, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
BOGOTA, Colombia - Nearly a century ago, Konrad Preuss did pioneering work in Colombia's most important archaeological zone, called San Agustin. But the German archaeologist also took 35 stone statues back to Germany, and now residents of the southern Colombian region where he worked have mounted a campaign to get them back. About 1,800 residents of the Andean community of the San Agustin region signed a petition this month in a grass-roots effort to urge Colombia's government to make a formal request for the return of the intriguing artifacts.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|