Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWorld War I
IN THE NEWS

World War I

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Armenians throughout Southern California will gather today for a series of public events to remember victims of the first-recorded genocide of the 20th century, when an estimated 1.5 million people were killed by the Turks during World War I. A protest will be held in front of the Turkish Consulate, 4801 Wilshire Blvd., at 3 p.m. Thousands are expected to march, chant and hold protest signs that call for the Turkish government's acknowledgment of the genocide, which it has long denied.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1999 | BONNIE HARRIS and CRYSTAL CARREON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When one of the best-known medals in the world was pinned to his checked blazer Monday, Ralph Latson pulled his 103-year-old frame to a standing position and proudly puffed out his chest. "This is a grand ol' day I'll never forget," he said simply, glancing down at the prestigious National Order of the Legion of Honor medal that dangled over his heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1996 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The guns of November roar Sunday. "The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century" is as elegant and intoxicating as any documentary to appear on television, and also as ghastly--eight hours of emotional thunderbolts powerful enough to convert possibly the most gung-ho hawk to pacifism. Granted four consecutive evenings on PBS, this memorial to World War I--and its 9 million dead and millions more physically and emotionally wounded--may wring you like a rag.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1994 | SONDRA FARRELL BAZROD
As Paul Jarrett, 99, recounted his World War I experiences, his voice was strong and his spirit bright. The memories were clear in his mind, as though the events had happened yesterday. "About a month after war was declared, in April, 1917, I knew I would be drafted, so I enlisted," said Jarrett, who was then 21 and running a stockyard in Osceola, Neb.
NEWS
May 28, 1990 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX
In Southern California, Memorial Day marks the start of a sacred tradition: the beach season. Beer and Coppertone and wine coolers. Across the nation, it is a day of rest, of barbecues, of swimming pool glare. But it was not always so. The custom of decorating the graves of war dead with flowers started in Waterloo, N.Y., about a year after the Civil War ended.
MAGAZINE
November 8, 1998 | James Ricci, James Ricci is a Times staff writer
Pvt. Homer Fisher of the rear guard is at his post, remembering. As he sits at a table in the Veterans Home of California in Yountville, sunlight from the adjacent Domaine Chandon vineyards sets aglow his blue eyes, his pink skin, his thin white hair. His recollections march in formation across the middle distance: Once again, the 56th Engineers parade before President Woodrow Wilson in Washington on Independence Day in 1917.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1989 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A quiet man, 94-year-old Bill Martin rarely talked about the four days he spent during World War I in the Battle of the Argonne Forest, when shrapnel from an exploding artillery shell tore off his left heel and left him disabled for the next 71 years. Martin never received the Purple Heart to which he was entitled for injury in battle, or a ribbon for the Army campaign. And he never joined a veteran's organization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1987 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
A Southern California group of Turkish-Americans has launched a campaign to defeat proposed legislation that would have California schoolchildren learn about the Armenian genocide during World War I. The American-Turkish Assn. of Southern California and its parent national organization, the Assembly of Turkish-Armenian Assns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1991 | ALLISON SAMUELS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For World War I veteran Ben Rosencranz, the television news broadcasts showing Israelis donning gas masks are a grim reminder of his two years on the battlefield, when wearing a gas mask was a part of his everyday survival. Rosencranz, 98, an Army corporal in World War I, said the news from the Persian Gulf brings back vivid memories of the smell of mustard gas in the trenches, and the pain of the men who fell victim to it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1998 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the 80th anniversary of the end of World War I, the French consul general in Los Angeles summoned two American veterans to his Beverly Hills residence Wednesday to honor them for fighting for his country's freedom. Consul Guy Yelda pinned the French Legion of Honor on Albert Willard, 101, of Sherman Oaks and Fred Roberts, 102, of Temple City. "Today, France wishes to express its gratitude," Yelda told the veterans in a ceremony attended by their families, friends and others.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|