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NEWS
May 11, 2001 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Galliano's pricey logo saddlebags and "ghetto fabulous" fashions for Christian Dior have made the luxury French design house cool again. And now, he is believed to be the first couturier to specially design a line sold exclusively on the Internet. The collection of casual sportswear--created for the online shopping site ELuxury.com.--is "highly covetable but 50% cheaper," at prices of $110 to $650, said the Gibraltar-born designer when announcing his venture.
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NEWS
May 3, 2001 | ROBERT NILES, robert.niles@latimes.com
How safe is the water at Southern California's beaches? A quick stop on the Internet provides the answer. Several local agencies publish Web sites that detail bacterial contamination at area beaches. "It's been very useful," said Steve Herbert, a local diver who, with his friends, regularly checks the Los Angeles County site to see whether dive locations are suitable. "I was alerted to it by a county lifeguard and added it to our Web site five months ago." L.A.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | MICHAEL JAMES, BALTIMORE SUN
Pablo Retes is a 47-year-old police instructor in Nayarit, Mexico. Anne Hiscock, 44, is a Web site administrator half a world away in Tasmania. But on any given day, they may be crooning directly to each other--and to a worldwide cyber-karaoke audience of 50,000 would-be pop singers. "When I sing an Elvis tune, the world's out there listening," says Retes, one of a growing number of karaoke fans letting loose on the Internet. "I never sing in bars. Just on the Web."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2001
On the World Wide Web, we can view NASA photos of Jupiter, listen to a speech by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. or view video clips of an expedition to Antarctica, and it's all made possible through the special codes of HyperText Markup Language, or HTML. Web page creation has become an increasingly important skill to use at school and at work for sharing information.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
CBS Corp.'s Infinity Broadcasting Corp. and other radio station owners sued to overturn a U.S. Copyright Office ruling that requires thousands of broadcasters using the Web to pay fees for playing music. The broadcasters sued Thursday in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia to overturn the decision that record companies are entitled to royalties when a station transmits music programming on a Web site. An arbitration panel will set the exact amount.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2000 | MICHAEL LIEDTKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The "dot-com" fairy tale turned into a macabre farce this year as one e-commerce company after another flopped and business bystanders clucked about the stupidity of it all. But it wasn't so long ago that plenty of smart people thought selling dog food, plush sofas and barbecue grills over the Internet were good ideas. Today's prevailing consensus about the absurdity of these e-commerce concepts illustrates how much the dot-com landscape has changed in the last 12 months.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2000 | ANICK JESDANUN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's amazing to think today, with the World Wide Web now spanning some 7 million sites, that its creator could barely get his colleagues interested at first. Ten years after the Web's creation, Tim Berners-Lee has different worries: keeping the Web from growing out of control as commercial developers pile layer after layer of software on top of the Web's foundation.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2000 | LEE DYE
Not long ago I tried to exercise my civic responsibility by leaving my car at home and taking the bus from suburbia to the Times building in downtown Los Angeles. But I eventually gave it up, primarily because I hated standing on a street corner waiting for a late bus while I could have been doing something constructive, like drinking another cup of coffee. Now, high tech--with a little help from low tech--may be coming to the rescue.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2000 | TODD PACK, ORLANDO SENTINEL
Amazon.com has been dubbed the "Wal-Mart of the Internet," a virtual superstore selling everything from "Harry Potter" books to potting benches. But it could lose its standing to a start-up that promises an even wider selection at everyday low prices. Before long, the Wal-Mart of the Internet may be . . . Wal-Mart. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world's No.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven new suffixes that promise to revolutionize the way the Internet is used joined the ubiquitous .com Thursday, marking a small but epochal shift in the evolution of the Internet from a computer network for researchers and corporations to a bustling agora of the masses. After more than three years of sifting through hundreds of possible new addresses, the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers voted to accept .biz, .info, .name, .pro, .museum, .aero and .
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